Repairing my carpenter's screw ups

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Old 09-08-15, 05:22 AM
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Repairing my carpenter's screw ups

Hi, I was trying to make preparations for painting my house and hired a carpenter to fix some weakening sidings.

1. How to treat the screw heads: when trying to cover some weak sidings, my carpenter simply put another coating on the old ones and secured them with screws instead of more invisible nails. Now there are many screw end on the siding. A painting said they would be covered by paint and should be ok. I am not comfortable with that. Will caulking these screwed areas be better and necessary?

2. How to waterproof the middle line: the carpenter put a line of wood to cover the seam where the old upper siding meets the new lower siding instead of using a flushing. Now it becomes a big problem for waterproofing. What's the best way to waterproof this area to protect the lower siding?

3. How to apply paint on this kind of siding? For this kind of siding, is spraying paint good enough (one painter said his spraying machine costs $3000 and will do an exceptional job)? Or spraying and backrolling is necessary to ensure good quality? If you look close at the second picture, you will see a lot of cracks in the paint on the old siding. Is it caused by too thin a paint that's sprayed on (and not back rolled). What will be a good way to avoid such problems from reoccurring?

I very much look forward to your professional and sincere advice. Thank you very much beforehand.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 05:59 AM
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I don't see any screws in your photo so they must be reasonably flush or counter sunk. If they are counter sunk the divot can be filled with painters caulk.

It looks like your job is not finished. I don't see anything covering the seam between your wall panels and there is no trim around the window. Both would need to be done before painting. For the seam between the upper and lower panels I would thoroughly caulk the joint. Then cover the joint with a wood strip like a 1x3" or 1x4" and caulk the top where it meats the house to prevent water from getting behind it.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 06:06 AM
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I couldn't get a good feel for the screws but assuming the heads are countersunk, I'd fill them with caulk or window glazing. Spraying often speeds up the painting process but a lot depends on the surrounding - sometimes the extra cover up and/or risk to neighboring cars, houses, etc isn't worth the time savings. Paint sprayed on the siding must be backrolled! That works the paint into the wood instead of just laying on top. It is perfectly acceptable to paint without a sprayer. A heavy nap paint loaded with paint will coat the grooves and then going back with a somewhat dry roller will dress it up.

Was/is there flashing between the 2 elevations of siding? I've painted numerous houses with T-111 or RB&B siding that had the flashing covered up with a wooden band.

btw - paint alone won't make the screw heads disappear, it will just make them the same color as everything else. What type of screws did he use? are they galvanized or coated so they won't rust?
 
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Old 09-08-15, 08:26 AM
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What a shame, wrong on many levels.

One, he could not even line up the seams on the t-111 with the upper existing boards. Two, lack of z-flashing will lead to failure in short order. Are the boards pressure treated or regular? And 3, Screws may hold OK but were not correct. Ring shanked nails 2 3/8" would have been better.

The seams between board should have an overlap so they should be fine. On the plus side, the screws will make it easier to change out down the road.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:51 PM
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what can I do to fix it?

Thank you all so much for the replies!

Now that I see there are a lot going wrong. : ((

The new board is LP SmartSide 3/8 Inch 4 Feet x 8 Feet 8 Inch OC Panel, bought from Homedepot: Lp Smartside | LP SmartSide 3/8 Inch 4 Feet x 8 Feet 8 Inch OC Panel | Home Depot Canada. If you can kindly look up this product for me and tell me how well it can resist moisture and how long it will last, it's much appreciated!

He did use nail on this wall. I will find out what kind of nails he used later on receipt and let you know.

(He used screws on another wall. I will post a picture of that wall later today.)

No Z-flashing used between the upper board and the lower ones. I remember he said he was afraid to damage the upper board. So although I bought the flashing they were not used. Is it ok to tear off the line of wood in the middle and redo it? It may cause some damage to the board.

Where can I find an honest painter that will do a good job for me? Please do not hesitate to make recommendations to me if you know one that's experienced and reliable.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 01:56 PM
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another thing to mention about flashing

As I have mentioned before, there is no flashing put in between the old upper board and the new lower board. But there is flashing between the old upper and old lower part. Will that help?

When I decided to put on another layer, I thought it would provide better protection. If water goes in between the old and the new layer, that will cause a bad problem?
 
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Old 09-08-15, 02:00 PM
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to Dane

Hi Dane,

I will take new pictures giving us a closer look at the screws and nails.

I do not quite understand what you mean by the seam between wall panels? Do you mean the dark lines? They are not seams. The boards come with grooves between panels.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 03:09 PM
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So you are saying that he did not even bother to remove the old boards and just slapped these on top?

Add that to the list of things done wrong......

Oh, finish out your profile, it says non-us but you reference Home Depot.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 03:16 PM
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When hiring a painter, as with any contractor, word of mouth and references [double check them] are your best bet. Usually the better painters will have a longer wait period [they're busy] and charge more.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 04:28 PM
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I see. another mistake. But can you please tell me why it is not right to just slap another layer? and how can I correct it to save the trouble of doing it all over. Thank you very much!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 04:35 PM
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looking for a good painter

I see. That's why I am ask in the forum to see if you know someone good.
 
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Old 09-08-15, 04:39 PM
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That's why I am ask in the forum to see if you know someone good
We don't make referrals. Besides unless a member lived in your area he wouldn't know any of the contractors anyway. Ask around and see what folks say. You could also go to the paint store and ask if they know which of the painters that trade there have a good reputation. But no matter how you get the name - check the references!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 04:47 PM
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The poster is from British Columbia. A closer view of the screw area.

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Old 09-08-15, 05:12 PM
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no, this is the old board, not the new ones. the black dots are not screws. I will post a new picture tonight showing the screw problem. Thank you!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 05:20 PM
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looking for painters

I see. Thank you very much!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 11:41 PM
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Screws on another wall & other problems

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Hi to all again!

I have taken more pictures to show:
1. Screws on the front siding (yesterday I posted a picture of the south siding)
2. Taken from inside, showing how new board is slapped on the old board for the front siding
3. A corner board that has also been slapped on but still have a very rough ending. Is this end fixable by painting?
4. Nail used on the south siding
5. The roughly treated window
6. The original board with flashing between upper and lower part

Now, I would like to ask if these problems are fixable at a reasonable cost and satisfactory result? If not, is it worthwhile to take everything new and old down and put on new sidings?

Things are turning out very unfavorable to me but I am ready to fix it in a reasonable way. I really need professional reliable advice as I do not want to do it wrong again. Your help is very much appreciated!
 
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Old 09-08-15, 11:44 PM
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Picture for the corner

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Looks it's missed just now
 
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Old 09-09-15, 04:51 AM
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I think at this point you need to call someone else in to review first hand. Obviously, this guy knew just enough to be dangerous yet not enough to do it right. This needs an on site evaluation and someone to walk you around and specifically point to areas and discuss corrective action.

Your last picture of the corner off the roof. The board on the left is cut too close to the roof line and there is no corner treatment of any kind to protect the edges.

Window trim will also be needed to address issues of water infiltration in that area as well. Flashing is needed above, not just caulk and a trim board.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 05:19 AM
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Specialist

Hi Cizizzi, thanks for the advice. What kind of specialist shall I call in to review the case with me please?
 
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Old 09-09-15, 05:43 AM
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I'd call in a siding contractor [that installs wood siding] to get his opinion. While a coat of paint will make everything look better you don't want to just hide the things that were done wrong.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 06:25 AM
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The description I read of the siding it sounded like glorified hard board siding or maybe strand board. I wouldn't use either on a dog house. Cement siding is about the only kind I'd trust to hold up.

The only good way is down to the studs. You don't want water logged rotting siding under the new and no good way to finish around doors and windows because they are set to be flush with one thickness of siding. You end up with the raw edge of the new exposed and that is where hardboard siding starts to fail first.
 

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Old 09-09-15, 01:39 PM
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Hi Ray, thanks for the advice. that board was the only kind of board that kind of match the old board. Is it of very bad quality? I learned of it too late.

So, better take them all off and redo it?
 
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Old 09-09-15, 02:28 PM
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Really am not familiar with your particular product but am always leery of so called "engineered products" which is how it is described.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 03:18 PM
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[QUOTE]

Got it. Thank you! I do not want to cover things up that's why I am asking here.
 
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Old 09-09-15, 04:44 PM
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I understand. My original intention was to protect the inside original wall. If I can prevent wall from going in between the boards, will that mean it's fine?
 
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