Is this drip edge sufficient?

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  #1  
Old 01-05-16, 07:02 PM
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Is this drip edge sufficient?

Just installed about 50 feet of sectioned gutters for the first time... everything went pretty good, and now i need to add a drip edge. Due to where i needed the downspout, there is a large gap (about 6 inches) between the shingles and the gutters... i had some scrap flashing laying around and cut a small piece to see if you guys think it would work for a proper drip edge.

Most of the drip edges i see have a little lip on the bottom... is that necessary, or would straight piece like this work?

http://i.imgur.com/sULUtdL.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/FzcKXcS.jpg

I have it pushed up under the shingles about 1.5 inches. It feels pretty secure just pushed up there, but i suppose i could put a few tacks in it (under the shingles) just to be sure.

If i dont need a little lip on the flashing, i can cut it and bend it myself. If it needs the lip, i guess i'll have to use someones brake.

Thanks for any advice!
 
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Old 01-05-16, 08:49 PM
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Why aren't your gutters higher? They should be clear up by the shingles, with no more than a couple inches of drop from end to end... certainly not 6" of drop! Even if the gutter was installed dead level, it would still drain- water seeks it's own level. You give it a little slope just to ensure it doesn't hold water or puddle.
 
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Old 01-05-16, 08:56 PM
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Sleeper i needed the downspout in a specific spot due to drainage issues. The roof line wasn't level and sloped downhill, but i needed the downspout on the uphill side... so i started with it 1/2" from the shingles on the low side and had to drop it that much to get water to drain out of it at the downspout.

I assumed that if the drip edge went from the shingles into the gutter, that it wouldn't really matter how much distance was between them. Is that wrong?
 
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Old 01-05-16, 09:09 PM
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Water that comes off the roof at a decent clip can sometimes completely miss the gutter when it's that low.
 
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Old 01-11-16, 12:51 AM
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Seem to me you followed the 1/8" per foot rule when installing the gutter. I see you have red chalk line so you probably used that line as a guide during installation. There was no need. Assuming the roof edge is level, or even if slopes the 'wrong' way for your purposes, the gutter should have been installed much closer to the shingle, disregarding the 1/8 rule. As long as there is some slope, no matter how minor, rainwater will drain.
Assuming you do not wish to remove and re-install, I would install the appropriate drip-edge metal flashing under the shingle with the lower bent lip protruding out from the fascia. This will help, in light rain to guide the run-off into the gutter. Having said that, nailing into the roof decking to hold the drip-edge in place, while raising the shingles will be difficult. You may want to caulk it in place with just a couple of nails, face nailed. As is, in a heavy downpour rainwater will completely overshoot the gutter with it being installed so low. The remedy in this instance, assuming the gutter remains as shown in the pic, is to install metal flashing on the front edge of the gutter, thereby extending the height of the gutter/flashing edge to be more in line with the shingle edge. That way, heavy run-off, overshoots the roof, hits the installed flashing and falls into the gutter. The metal flashing would be attached through the face of the gutter with sheet metal screws or, preferable pop-rivets and painted.
 
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Old 01-12-16, 03:48 AM
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Andy thanks for all that input, i really appreciate it. Good tip about putting flashing on the front of the gutter to effectively raise it up.

I used 1/4" per 10 ft drop on it, but i ended up just putting water in it and watching to make sure it was draining as i fastened it. I was using a very small amount of water though, and later I realized that it probably didnt need to be sloped that much, since the large amount of water coming down in a rainfall would push it along even more.

Anyway, here is where i'm at on it. I cut about 15 feet of flashing and slid it up under the shingles temporarily to test it out.

http://i.imgur.com/ITF6KFD.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/Vxmr5kS.jpg

The flashing makes the gap a lot more noticeable to me... especially where i had to cut strips to go around the hangers.

http://i.imgur.com/JR6nR8l.jpg

I tested it with a sprinkler, and then we happened to get a lot of rain, and i think the system performed well. However, i only had the flashing on the side where the gutters are up next to the shingles, and it was only moderate rain... so a downpour might result in the issue you and sleeper talked about where the rain would overshoot the gutter, even if it had flashing on that section.

After thinking about everything, im really considering re-positioning the gutters so that they drain the opposite direction, which will allow me to use the natural slope of the roof, and position them up near the shingles where they should be. I feel like i could get them to function properly the way i have them with some work, but it would look a lot better going the other way... and i wouldnt have to deal with making a 7" gap work.

The downside of doing this is that it will require a lot more work dealing with the runoff on that side of the house... but the water situation on that side of the house needs to be fixed anyway, so i might as well suck it up and do it.

I've been reading up on methods to deal with standing water, and am trying to decide if i want to use a catch basin and/or dry well, or just run a pipe all the way out to a large drainage ditch out back.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

In case anyone is curious, here is a short video that shows the entire situation. The trench in the front yard is a temporary one i had dug to route the gutter runoff into a drainage ditch in the front yard. If i reposition the gutter, everything will drain on the left side of the house, where the yellow stepladder is. That is a really low spot, and you can see a bunch more water on the back corner of the house which floods that area.

TURN YOUR SPEAKERS DOWN BEFORE YOU CLICK THE VIDEO, BECAUSE I THINK ITS KIND OF LOUD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNdR...m-upload_owner


Here are a couple of rough diagram where i screen-capped the side of the house where the downspout will be located, and the two options i am considering. Assuming this plan will work, i guess the question right now is whether i want to run the pipe out ~60ft and put in a dry well with gravel, or just make it a straight ~150ft run out to the drainage ditch with no gravel.

http://i.imgur.com/yhMjWIf.png

http://i.imgur.com/71jiojU.jpg

Thanks again everyone!
 
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Old 01-16-16, 07:13 PM
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Ok i ended up removing the gutters and refastened them so they sloped the other direction, so that i could eliminate the 6" gap. Will be a lot more work to deal with the water runoff in that location, but it looks a lot better now that they are up near the shingles all the way across.

Now i am installing drip edge. The roof line has some issues with short shingles, and sections where the shingles slope up slightly at the bottom... i'm assuming that in this situation, the more drip edge i can get under the shingles the better... correct?

With that in mind i was going to use this preformed drip edge that has about 3" that sticks up under the shingles:



but i didn't like how it had a hump right before it enters the gutter:



So i took some of my flashing and just made one bend in it like this, so it has about 3 - 3.5" to slide up under the shingles:



Here are some pictures of it installed, so you guys can tell me what you think:









Does that all look sufficient?

If so, i have two other questions...

1. I caulked the sections together with painters caulk, and put a rivet in the top bottom... is it overkill to caulk/rivet them, or should i go ahead and do it? Example:






2. It's going to be difficult to fasten them under the shingles... they feel pretty secure just sitting there, since there is so much up under the shingles, but i thought i might put one screw through the front and into the gutter every 8 feet or so to give it some more stability... will this be ok/sufficient? I wont tighten it down, I'll make it so that the screw head just makes contact with the dripedge. Example:



I feel really good about how the flashing was forming and fitting into the gutter... so hopefully it all looks ok. Thanks for any advice.

Edit: Someone suggested that i should push the flashing back up under the shingles as much as i can, so that they can overhang it as much as possible. I should be able to get them back a little more.
 

Last edited by tiresharkdbb; 01-16-16 at 08:24 PM.
  #8  
Old 01-21-16, 02:47 PM
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I don't like the shingle lip. The bottom shingles should extend at least 1" past the flashing. I prefer 1.5" because you don't want the wind whipping the rain between flashing and shingles. The way I always did it was to put a 'backing shingle' upside down all along the edge, using your 1-1.5" overlap. Along the bottom and up the side and nailed a few inches away from the edge. Then your first shingle at the bottom lays perfectly even on that backing shingle and is nailed above the tab. This way, the tar from the backing shingle will stick to the bottom row, preventing rain from wicking up. Nailing this backing shingle close to the decking edge will prevent rain from getting underneath and rotting decking. Regular 2" flashing can be used if you'd like. Your flashing needs to be nailed down and it should work since you have the flashing going up 6" under bottom row.
 
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