How would you fix this?

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Old 01-09-16, 06:17 PM
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How would you fix this?

I recently bought a house that has a covered patio that is covered by a nearly-flat corrugated aluminum roof. As you can see from the picture below, I found it to be covered with a ton of debris and obviously not maintained properly by the previous owner. The covering is pitched slightly away from the house and has a small collection groove on the end opposite the house that collects rainwater and runs it to a downspout on the far corner of the unit. (It was obviously totally obstructed all the way across the unit.) It was leaking during rainfall from random spots in the unit and two of the sheet metal screws holding the bottom of the unit had broken off under the weight of the debris.

It is not sturdy enough to walk on and has a bunch of joists running in different directions, making it an absolute bear to try and clean off. I had called every gutter and roofing company in town trying to see if someone would do it and although some came out to look at it nobody wanted any part of it, I understand why.

I was eventually able to go up myself and clear it off (it is about 20ft x 12ft in dimension). However it is right below a pecan tree and I can assume it will end up like this again before long. I never want to clean this again.

I was wondering - how would you all experts fix this problem? Would you install some sort of rolled gutter screen over the entire area? Put ANOTHER layer of corrugated steel or aluminum over the top of all of it? Something better than that? Different ideas?

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Old 01-09-16, 06:26 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Interesting design. I've never seen the supporting members over the roof like that. I can see that it would be a bear to clean.

I have a corrugated roof but the supports are under it. And that's no treat to clean either with a massive oak tree right over it. When I need to go up on it I'll throw a few sheets of plywood on top to walk on. I also have a few supports, like dead men, that go under between the patio and the cover for additional weight support.

I have no immediate ideas for you but I'll think on it and others will stop by and add their ideas.
 
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Old 01-09-16, 06:47 PM
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I would get rid of whatever is growing there, lay plywood on top of the supports & shingle it.
 
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Old 01-09-16, 07:05 PM
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Sure looks like they built it upside down! Every patio cover I've seen like that has the corrugated on top, like Pete said.

If you ask me, it's a tear down and do over. But if you are determined to save it, I'd rip the corrugated off the bottom, and put new aluminum corrugated on top. I'd be afraid to add all the weight of plywood and shingles, and it's too low pitch for shingles anyway. You might get by with plywood and an EDPM roof, or a torch down, but it's hard to guess how much weight those trusses will support. They look fairly beefy but they are far apart, probably too far apart for 1/2 inch sheathing.

Further complicated by the fact that you have a lot of roof area draining on to that thing and that water has to go somewhere. Tear it down, put up gutters on the roof, and build a free standing covered structure in the space. It probably won't cost much more than trying to salvage that thing. And you can collect scrap value for all the aluminum, which will add up.
 
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Old 01-09-16, 08:11 PM
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Agree on the tear down as CT said. I wouldn't add anything to the top without knowing what the joists were designed for, which I can almost guarantee you are not for a roof.

You could move the bottom to the top, but even that is a concern as far as the weight of debris that will fall on it.
I'd say in the meantime figure a way to clean most of the heavy debris off easily, maybe a hoe.
 
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Old 01-09-16, 08:52 PM
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Not sure if it's cost effective to salvage. If you really want save it and the expense is worth it, to you, you could roll out aluminum screening and fixt it to the beams with lath screws. Water would drain through while debris would be collected on top of the screen making it a little easier to remove. I'd also invest in a blower rather than trying rake it off.
 
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Old 01-09-16, 09:18 PM
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Nothing to add but that is built like a gas station awning not a residential carport. Gas station awnings are built with supports on top. Maybe it was built by a friend in the gas station construction business.

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Old 01-09-16, 10:30 PM
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Thanks for your replies.

I like the idea of a tear down but not the cost, obviously. Wondering if there is some way to salvage this oddly built abomination. Andy I do like the possibility of your idea - are you talking about screen wire as in this: Shop Phifer Natural 60-in x 50-ft Brite Aluminum Screen Wire at Lowes.com (technically designed for screen doors and the like)? Or are you picturing gutter guard-like material?

I think plywood and shingling it is too much weight for the structure. Any salvage has to be lightweight because I can't be sure how much it was designed to hold. Leaving it alone will allow a pretty regular and hefty accumulation of debris and poorly draining water which is also not good.

In all I estimate the debris I removed weighed around 400-500lb. There was a layer of decomposed leaves/dirt-like material under the leaves/sticks/etc. that was wet and VERY heavy.

What about laying sheets of corrugated steel or aluminum running from the house toward the edge of the patio roof, over the top of the existing structure? Something like this? Shop Fabral 2-1/2-in Corrugated 2.16-ft x 12-ft Corrugated Steel Roof Panel at Lowes.com
I could run about 10 of these from the edge of the shingles across the top of the structure at a total weight add of about 120lbs. That is certainly less than the weight I removed off of the structure today. Downsides is that the pitch supposedly required is not the minimum 2.5:12. It cannot possibly be worse than what is there now, though.. right? Thoughts - yay or nay?
 
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Old 01-09-16, 10:39 PM
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The pitch is not your problem. You don't care if it leaks as you have the lower cover BUT
how will you attach those 2.15' panels to the structure when it looks like the structure is quite a bit wider than that panel ?
 
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Old 01-09-16, 11:34 PM
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If the debris weighed 500 pounds, the structure can probably hold more than you would think. How much would 10 sheets of corrugated steel or aluminum weigh?
 
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Old 01-10-16, 05:03 AM
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No Idea on how to clean it but There is a nice tree growing in the middle of it.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 12:15 PM
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PJ,

The only way to really secure them would be with sheet metal screws at the sides where I can reach with a power drill, etc. The centers of the panels would be pretty much unsecured. Not sure I can see a way to secure those from above. (I would run the 12 ft portion across the 10 ft edge of the structure.)

Pulpo,

The 10 sheets would weigh about 120 lbs.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 12:29 PM
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I've heard you get some wind in TX. Your unsecured panels will take the first good blow out of town. I think you would need to add some intermediate structure to fasten the panels better. Plus, if you just fasten the edges, they are going to potato chip in the hot sun.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 12:30 PM
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Those panels have little to no structural integrity. They need to be supported every 16" or so or they will bow and fall in.

You'd almost have to use interlocking panels where the interlocking section would add some strength.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 12:46 PM
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When I have seen residential carports built the built them on the ground then use lifts to raise them and install the posts after they were raised. I don't know that that information helps but if you could figure a way to do it you might be able to remove the posts, lower it to the ground and flip it over. The raise it up and reinstall the posts. I doubt that is practical though.

Edit: Four temporary posts about a foot from your patio cover and taller than the patio cover. Use four come-a-longs to lift the patio cover. Temporarily remove the patio cover posts and lower to the ground. Buy enough bear and burgers for your strongest friends and get them to help you flip it. Reverse process.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 06:00 PM
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The 10 sheets would weigh about 120 lbs.
That's not bad at all. <----- That message is too short.
 
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Old 01-10-16, 08:51 PM
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Robdalky, I was envisaging rolled screening, similar to that in your link. Two rolls might do it and I would overlap at least 4" . No additional supports would be needed. Not sure about the longevity though but a few years at least. Rolled rabbit wire might also work but a little more difficult to apply. Wear good leather gloves if you go that route.
 
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Old 01-11-16, 05:36 AM
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And loose that tree.
Any roof over that area, and the slab will be effected by that tree.
 
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Old 01-11-16, 02:58 PM
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I'd build wood frames for the screen wire or even use aluminum DIY screen frames. They could be hooked to the edges to hold in place and for easy removal. The advantage is no figuring how to attach loose screen wire and easy removal to clean debris.
 
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