How do you repair dented eavestrough

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  #1  
Old 06-20-16, 07:00 AM
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How do you repair dented eavestrough

Just noticed yesterday that my eaves trough is dented.
eaves trough's are 2 years old.

Not sure what happened. I don't think anything hit it.
I kinda think it may be due to rain build up because there is a bit of a low point right where the dent is located. A little bit of ice will be in that spot and the rest of the eaves trough will be dry. Not a larger amount. I think the problem if i have a long house and on the front of the house there are only downspouts at the side of the house.

So how do I smooth out this dent:




 
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Old 06-20-16, 07:07 AM
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Looks more like a buckle then a dent to me.
Lack of enough gutter hangers, or they pulled out could be some of the causes.
There is no great way to fix the damaged area and not have it show, needs to be replaced.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 07:46 AM
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Looks like the pitch of the trough is (was) flat, and encourages water to linger in the middle where it froze and created a negative pitch; and it will get worse. The middle ought to be slightly elevated so that it remains the highest and driest point (and not the lowest and wettest).

It looks like you've now got just the opposite of what the Installer should have done. Just a 1° would do it. The Installer may have been more concerned about appearances than functionality . . . . but that 1° or 2° pitch to the downspouts wouldn't even be perceptible (except to flowing water).
 
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Old 06-20-16, 08:05 AM
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The hangers do seem sturdy.

The eves does have quite a run:


White car is where the garage is. This is the longest run of eves on the house.

So do you guys think the contractor could tell its wrong from these pics?
I was thinking they could blame a leaf build up and was thinking I would show them pic empty and then use a hose to show a bit of water sits there.
Its been 2 years, but they have been good about fixing things that are obvious installation related defects.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by ironmanx
". . . So do you guys think the contractor could tell its wrong from these pics? . . ."
I don't know how convincing any pictures can be without a Site Visit . . . . around here, people only see what they want to see.

A garden hose could probably create a puddle in the trough that doesn't move quickly, without lingering, to the end with the downspout . . . . can that be portrayed in a photo ?

I used to clean my gutters with a garden hose, and observe the movement to insure there were no obstructions, and that the pitch hadn't somehow changed to retard the exodus.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 09:29 AM
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Yeah true a site visit is really the only way for them to tell.

I'm no construction expert so i like to provide as much detail when i email them. I did take 3 videos last year of a leaking eves where the valley is and they came and fixed it.
Looking back at the video you can see water in that section of eves. Likes I said I figured it was ok as once the water got high enough it would flow out no issues.

Video of leaking from last year:
https://youtu.be/K7QxrrdMhDQ
https://youtu.be/WXDM6PjDsv0
https://youtu.be/iI4yl93frpU

I thought this was just a cosmetic issue but sounds like its worse then that now. Hopefully they can/will repair it.
 
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Old 06-20-16, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by ironmanx
". . . I figured it was ok as once the water got high enough it would flow out no issues . . ."
I'm just a Real Estate Broker; but many of the roof drainage systems I see are damaged because of a little water accumulation like yours, which freezes and gathers more water and ice, and creating ice dams until it becomes so heavy that it breaks the gutter right off the building.

Many times, this is due to poor maintenance and clogged downspouts which become pillars of ice blocking all flow, and resulting major damage to the residence.

If you never have freezing, then I guess it would be okay to leave standing water in the gutter . . . . but it sounds like you're in a colder climate like mine.
 
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