Snow Belt


  #1  
Old 04-25-01, 01:31 PM
Guest
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Question

I would like to install a "snow belt" or equivalent to the lower edge of my roof up here in NH snow country to prevent ice dams on this old house. The local lumber company sells 30" x 36" "snow belt" metal pannels but does not have instructions. Please advise where I can find instructions on how to install this type of item to my existing roof. Also please advise where on the internet I could find other manufacturers of this type of edging that might be of different colors or materials.. My internet search has not been sucessful.

Thank you very much.
 
  #2  
Old 12-29-03, 11:21 AM
Fluffy
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HI Bill,

We also live in NH and are searching for the same information for installation and manufacturers of ice belt.

did you have any luck getting information on these products?
 
  #3  
Old 12-29-03, 03:35 PM
Grumpy
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Are you talking about Ice and water shield that goes under the shingles? I've never heard of a product called snow or ice belt.

Ice and water shield goes under the shingles before the other underlayments are installed. I would consider it a must for anyone that lives in areas of heavy snow.
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-04, 12:18 PM
P
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No Grumpy, I think they are talking of a wide strip of metal (steel or aluminum) installed along the eave. We often see this solution in Quebec (we're further north than NH) on asphalt shingle roofs.

BillC and Fluffy, the snow belts are very simple to make and therefore are almost always field-formed. If I were to do this, I would first apply ice-and-water shield membrane along the eave, letting the bottom edge hand over the eave by at least 1". Depending on how wide your eaves are, you may even want to put a second width of membrane (4 inch overlap) above the first.

Next, you need a roll of painted steel or aluminum (usually available in rolls 24 inches wide by 50 feet or even 100 feet). You need to put a drip lip on the lower edge using a metal brake, or if you don't have access to one, visit your local sheet metal shop. Cut your panels no more than 10 feet long (metal expands and contracts, and the longer the piece, the more it will buckle). Lay the panels at the eave, with the drip lip extending past the fascia. Overlap each panel by at least four inches. Nail the panels along the top edge, and at the fascia, under the drip lip. To finish, install asphalt shingles over the upper edge of the metal, covering the nails.

If this seems like too much work, you may want to contact either a roofing company that works with metal, or a good siding installer who works with aluminum. In our area, both types of companies install this feature.
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-04, 11:29 AM
Grumpy
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P got any pics of this snow belt? What I am invisioning from your description we'd never use on a shingle roof around here.
 
  #6  
Old 01-04-04, 01:51 PM
P
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Sure Grumpy, I'll take pictures of a few in my area and post them. Got to put that digital camera I got at Christmas to good use!
 
 

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