Roof Felt


  #1  
Old 04-27-01, 07:42 PM
jaknik2
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I am wondering about the significance between 30 and 15 pound roofing felt? Given the choice, would money be better spent on high quality shingles or roofing felt?

Seems these days many are high on the membrane method for valleys and under the first course areas. I live near Davenport Iowa. Not to worry, I am far from the raging Mississippi River. On average, we don't have alot of heavy rainfall or snowfall. We do seem to have our fair share of windy conditions though.

I am trying to figure out just what materials to use without going into an overkill area. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

JAK
 
  #2  
Old 04-28-01, 05:59 PM
Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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Cool

I'm not a roofing pro, but a higher quality shingle over either weight of roofing felt is the first choice.
I also live in a windy area (coastal NC), and when I re-roofed my 32'-high A-frame, I went with 30-lb felt and 40-year architectural fiberglas shingles.
I even had all edges cemented down with 6" of plastic roofing cement.
When a hurricane is roaring, there aint no such thing as "overkill", and my roof has been through several since '91, and I have never lost a single shingle.
If you think that you might lose shingles, I would go with the 30-lb.
Good Luck!
Mike

 
  #3  
Old 04-29-01, 04:24 PM
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Your roof starts with the decking, then the felt, and then the shingles.

MY advice is to use 30# felt nail it or staple it down straight and flat. 3" overlap (first line on edge).

I run a shingle starter on the eave and the entire rake. Flash EVERY valley.

Use hand drive roofing nails or a roofing nail gun, NOT staples to attach the shingles.

Follow the written instructions that you can read on every bundle wrapper of shingles. If you do this, you will be under full warranty by the shingle manufacturer.

If you fail to follow the instructions...............you bought yourself a new roof.

I recommend the 30#. It makes a much better roof.
 
  #4  
Old 04-30-01, 03:30 PM
jaknik2
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Oldguy/Morethanacarpenter

Thanks for your responses and patience! I have helped friends with several roof jobs but never planned the entire project myself. It's better to make most of the mistakes on paper. I also learned long ago not to rely on the sales staff at material suppliers as they tend to sell you more than you need.

So, it appears 30# felt is in order here. I spent last Saturday visiting roofing supply houses. I was looking for a close replacement shingle to what I have. I got the impression that the old asphalt shingles are now being replaced by fiberglass backed asphalt shingles. Are these newer shingles any good (IKO)? Any opinions on the need for using the expensive "membrane"? Could this "membrane" be used as an underlayment in the valleys created where my attached garage interesects the house?

Once again, thanks for your advice.......Gary
 
  #5  
Old 05-01-01, 07:52 AM
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The membrane is an ice shield. It will also work in this application.
 
 

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