Trouble removing shingles in 100F


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Old 09-20-17, 01:33 PM
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Trouble removing shingles in 100F

Was trying to replace some ~12 year old architectural timberline shingles in Florida recently. I think it was like 110 with heat index. I would probably get 1st degree burns even through my pants if I was kneeling/sitting on the shingles long enough, kind of like walking in the street barefooted on a hot day.


Basically the architectural shingles are a 3 tab shingle with half of a second layer on top of that (called the saw tooth shingles). Some of the saw tooths were lost in the hurricane but the main 3 tab shingles are fine. I wanted to replace some of these though.

I read it's not recommended to do shingles above like 85 but then how do people do roofs in places where it's hot most of the time? I could not even tap a putty knife under the shingles lightly using a hammer is what I'm saying. The shingles are soft in the heat but the tar strips under the shingles are so solid felt like I was hitting a nail on a few of them but I would move the putty knife over a bit and got the same thing, I could not get the putty knife under - It would be very tedious and take like 45 minutes just to release one shingle (have to remove the two shingles above it to replace and some are also tied into ridge shingles). Have to be very careful or the putty knife can go right through the shingle and ruin it. I just left it how it is for now because the main 3 tab shingles are all fine and an insurance claim is being made.


My question though is how do you replace just one shingle when it's this hot? Is there a trick like to cool them down with ice water lol? I worked for a roofer briefly in Winter in like 30 degrees NY and they had a guy who just sat there all day with a blow torch thing heating up shingles one by one out of the bundles. The roof (tar) was soft from the heat so I would think a putty knife would go easily between the shingles but it was damn near impossible. anyone experienced with this? I'm not trying to fix it now, I just want to know the trick if there is one. Thanks.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 02:03 PM
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Heat should soften the tar. Regardless of the weather, I remove shingles singly with a thin bar.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 04:34 PM
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I read it's not recommended to do shingles above like 85 but then how do people do roofs in places where it's hot most of the time?
Early in the morning and quit when the temps get too high.
 
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Old 09-20-17, 07:44 PM
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@gunner666 I understand your frustration. I've needed to replace sections of my architectural shingles and it's a real PITA to try to preserve the surrounding shingles. You get your bar under the shingle above, try to lift the nail up without going through the shingle above it, and manage to rip the shingle or you try to break the tar seal and manage to poke through the shingle you're trying to save.
I agree with @stickshift; a thin bar is needed in order to get under the shingle and lift the nail.
I also agree with @Ron53; work when it's still cool.
In addition to the flat bar, I used a brick trowel to get under the shingle and break the seal. Like you said about the putty knife, you need to be careful not to poke through the shingle, so you need to keep the tool flat so the point does not angle up and puncture the shingle. The large surface area of the brick trowel coupled with the offset handle makes it much easier to use than a putty knife.
 
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Old 09-22-17, 04:57 PM
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Early in the morning and quit when the temps get too high."

They roof any time of day where it's hot like that year round though.


I simply couldn't get the putty knife under. It was as if was hitting a nail. Maybe I was hitting a nail but I moved the putty knife over a couple inches and I was the same thing, like trying to put a putty knife though a thick think of hardened caulk. It was taking forever to do carefully enough to not damage shingles. I dunno. I think the heat shoulda made the tar easier to get through but the roof gets so hot it mighta had a reverse effect even though the shingles themselves were like squishey from the heat.

someone suggested hose it down but it was so hot it would basically need a constant stream of water but I dunno.
 
 

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