Underground drainage pipe issues

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Old 06-27-18, 11:57 AM
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Underground drainage pipe issues

I'm dealing with 2 underground gutter downspout extensions. The first one is behind the house and is about 80' long, and I've been unable to unplug it. The downspout itself is fine, but I can't explore the beginning of the underground extension there since the pipe turns at a right angle about 4' down. (In heavy rain I've seen water spewing from where the downspout enters the pipe as well as from the gutter overhead.) The exit at the other end of the pipe is solid with stuff starting about 3' in and I can't poke anything past that point. The pipe is pvc where the gutter downspout enters it and as far as I can see below. The exit end is corrugated plastic. If I assume the pipe has to be replaced, is there a problem using corrugated pipe again?

I also determined that the reason I was getting water in my basement is because the guy who installed underground pvc in front of the house put the bottom end of that gutter downspout into a vertical pipe that goes down into the drain tile which apparently becomes overwhelmed by the volume of water in a heavy rain. When I removed the downspout from the pvc (and capped it off) I attached a 50' length of corrugated pipe to the end of it and led it away from the house. I haven't had a flooded basement in the 2 years since. Now I'd like to have that gutter extension go underground since it's right at the corner of steps and next to a stone path. The area is wooded and lots of trees are in the way. I'm sure some damage will occur, but what kind of pipe would be best to use here? Also, in both instances, who typically does this kind of work: A plumber? Landscaper? Excavator? What equipment should be used, especially with the heavily treed area in front where no pipe is underground yet? Thank you for any suggestions.
 
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Old 06-27-18, 04:56 PM
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I use smooth walled PVC for all underground drain lines. The thin walled drain pipe style is OK, stronger is schedule 40 and if you want to go crazy schedule 80. All smooth PVC pipe is better than corrugated black pipe when buried. When burying the lines I would have a cleanout installed every 50 feet so clogs can be easily cleared in the future.

When burying gutter drain lines the biggest job is digging the trenches. There is no special knowledge of building codes required but you do need someone with common sense and a willingness to do a good job. Someone with a small excavator (track hoe) would be my first search .
 
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Old 06-28-18, 04:44 AM
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Corrugated drain pipe is well, drain pipe, you can use PVC but the added cost is not really going to get you much benefit. Assuming you dont have a lot of crud going down the drains, and you have SUFFICIENT SLOPE they will perform great.

Over the last 6 homes I have installed drains for all my gutters, the last 2 I rented a trencher and had everything dug in half a day, by far the easiest method.

If I didnt mention, you need SUFFICIENT SLOPE for a gravity drain to function correctly!
 
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Old 06-28-18, 06:28 PM
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Smooth wall PVC will flow much more water than the corrugated design, during heavy downpours. The corrugated is easier to install but why not do everything possible to correct your problems the 1st time
 
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Old 08-11-18, 08:14 AM
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I'll probably have to go with the corrugated due to simplicity, but is perforated or solid better in my situation? I checked again and it's perforated at the exit. The slope in both cases is fine. Even if I rented a small excavator of some kind (which would have to be delivered and picked up), it probably couldn't be used for the second downspout because of the obstructions. I've been unable to find someone to do the digging and may have to try it myself by hand--not great for a 73-year-old female with a wrist problem.
 

Last edited by Fritzy; 08-11-18 at 08:39 AM.
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Old 08-11-18, 08:49 AM
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If using corrugated pipe, use the solid. Perforated will allow roots to penetrate and clog the pipe.
 
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Old 08-11-18, 10:41 AM
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Solid is for drain, like your gutters to get it to a destination point.

Pipe with holes is for a french drains when you want surface/surrounding water to collect in a pipe to drain away, it requires the pipe to be in a bed of pea gravel!
 
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