Water intrusion on door jamb under eave overhang

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Old 10-05-18, 12:29 PM
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Water intrusion on door jamb under eave overhang

It rained a little yesterday after dry summer. We had water dripping from the door jamb in a stucco-sided wall that has an eave that overhangs 6" horizontal and maybe 2" vertical. The gutter is not flashed properly, so water gets between it and the facia, but I don't see how that water could work its way around or over the facia and back 6" on the underside of a sloped roof to get in behind the stucco to drip out of the door frame.
Roof is composite shingles, sloped, and there's a valley above and just to the left of the problem area. Shingles look good, no obvious nail pops or breaks. I see no intrusion in the attic but can't see all the way to the point where roof and wall meet in there.
I tried spraying water all over both sides of the valley and above the problem area today but couldn't recreate the drip.
See annotated photos in links:
Front view
Top of door view
View straight up
Any ideas on how to stop this dripping?
Thanks.
Mike
 
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Old 10-05-18, 12:37 PM
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The wall above (left end of gutter) probably lacks a kick out flashing. Google it and click on images.

or it could be the way the roof is flashed at the fascia tail that is right below the valley.
 
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Old 10-05-18, 01:10 PM
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Thanks for the reply. It does lack kickout flashing. However, it's not on the wall that has water intrusion. There is step flashing on that seam, so I don't know how the water would intrude into the wall that has the door in it.
Front view
Thanks.
Mike
 
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Old 10-05-18, 01:34 PM
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Water can do weird things. But yes it is probably most likely that the valley area is the source and that leak is running straight down under the shingles until it reaches a weak area in the felt paper. Once under the felt paper it enters at a seam in the roof decking... and gets behind the stucco at the top plate... runs out at the door perimeter.
 
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Old 10-05-18, 03:07 PM
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That explanation does make perfect sense. Here's a photo of the valley. Any thoughts on how to find and fix the problem with it? I don't know how it's constructed, but there's, like, a hump in it.
If the valley is the problem, I can see how it would take a while and a lot of water for the drip to show up, thus why I couldn't recreate the problem with the garden hose.
Mike
 
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Old 10-05-18, 04:19 PM
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Oh yikes. What a horrible design! I can see why it leaks. Yeah I don't know that there is a simple solution for that. And it looks like someone redid it not too long ago... probably a recurring problem. It really needs ice and water shield as the roof underlayment (sticks to the decking) and it would need to be layered correctly at the valley ends. Looks to me like the shingles overlay the valley and are gooped up with tar. End of the valley looks like water could wrap underneath the valley ends easily. I don't see any flashing at the fascia... plus 3 tabs leak more readily than a laminated shingle would.

In a perfect world that roof should be reframed and resheeted to create a larger cricket to eliminate the big low slope area between the adjacent roofs.

Sorry, I don't see a simple fix. That's a real cluster.
 
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Old 10-05-18, 07:31 PM
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Thanks, again. The roof to the right in the "valley" photo is an addition from 2004 (to the left is also an addition from at least the early 1990s). I don't think the newer shingles on the right are from work being done to fix this problem. BTW, in case it's not clear, this house is in San Diego. There are only a handful of strong storms per year here. So, the problem may have been around for years but didn't set off alarms.
My best DIY move at this point might be to put some roof sealer on some seams and wait a couple of months for rain to see if it helps.
Or perhaps it's time for me to consult a professional.
Thanks.
Mike
 
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Old 10-13-18, 10:03 AM
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Update: no apparent leaks after patching some seams

Since my last post, I put some roof patch material on the seams in the valley (see photo linked in a previous post). Last night, we had a fair bit of rain about equal to the amount that produced a leak a few weeks ago, and there seems to have been no leak in the problem area.
Thanks for you comments in helping me decide on the seams that seemed to require patching.
Mike
 
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Old 10-13-18, 04:36 PM
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Thanks for posting back. We always wonder how things worked out.
 
 

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