New roof installed over rotting fascia / molding

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  #1  
Old 01-03-19, 11:08 AM
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New roof installed over rotting fascia / molding

Hi all - so we recently had a new roof installed (laminate shingles). After installation, the contractor - who is our neighbor and was not involved directly in the install - noticed the fascia and molding on the front edge of the eave overhang was rotted - causing the shingles along that edge to droop downward. Rotted molding attached to the fascia is easily seen from the street. I attached a picture where you can sort of see this "droopy" condition on the old roof as well. There's no rot that I can see from the attic, but I can't see the edge of the rafters (?) that extend out to the overhang.

Yes, I wish we were informed before the new drip edge and shingles were put on, and we're not happy about that. The roofers were clearly rushing to get the job done. We would certainly have preferred to had the work done then before the new roof was installed. However, as unfortunate as this is, I do believe that ship has sailed. Right now I'm trying to look forward and assess what we're in for in terms of replacing that entire edge of newly installed roofing after tackling the rotted fascia etc (yes, professionals will be called in for both jobs).

Can recently-installed shingles simply be pulled back along the edge while the repair is made? If not, how does one pull off a side row of shingles like that and replace them (and how much work is that)? I'm mostly curious how this part of the job SHOULD be done, so I can be a bit more informed when discussing options, etc. We will likely wait until the spring to tackle this job (in New England) - our contractor / neighbor has offered to try and temporarily shore up the worst of the drooping edge so we can get through the winter.
 
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  #2  
Old 01-04-19, 05:28 AM
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Check your contract to see if there are any exclusions by the contractor? Since the contractor can't see below the shingles, my guess is they have a statement that any decking / trim removal/install is in addition to the quote. Even if your neighbor didn't do the actual work, the contractor is responsible for the installation. Ask him why they didn't replace the fascia (and possibly wet decking)?
 
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Old 01-04-19, 05:58 AM
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In my area fascia is not part of a roofing job. Roof sheeting is but fascia is not since it's really not part of the roof. Luckily in most cases the fascia is easily replaced without disturbing the roof or shingles.
 
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Old 01-04-19, 06:21 AM
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We didn’t have a written contract - just a verbal agreement (I know, I know).

Since the last 4-6” of shingling at the edge is drooping, I thought the shingles would have to be pulled back or removed to properly address then issue, no? I imagine they would have to be at least “pushed up” once whatever is collapsing (molding, end of plank etc) to allow them to droop is replaced.

How do roofers replace a clean line of shingles along a “non-starter” edge (side, not bottom)?
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-19, 07:01 AM
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the last 4-6” of shingling at the edge is drooping
That sounds like more than just a bad fascia board. What is the condition of the rafter tails/soffit? Can you post a closer pic showing the droop?
 
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Old 01-04-19, 08:27 AM
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If your roof is drooping that far back from the edge you have bigger problems. You might have; rotten rafter tails/ends, rotten roof sheeting, rotten fascia and possibly even rotten soffit underneath. I'm not sure I'd worry about doing any fascia repair now but come spring I'd look seriously at the whole area. I would be very angry if you have rotten sheeting and rafter tails and the roofers didn't repair it or bring it to someone's attention.

Do you have any of the wrappers left from your shingles? If so look for the batch or lot number on the shingles and see if you can buy enough from that same batch/lot to cover the damaged area of your roof. The current shingles can be carefully removed but that's a bit slow and still some will get damaged. Depending on labor rates in your area it's often cheaper to just rip the shingles off without trying to save them then install new ones after the wood repairs. Getting shingles from the same lot will insure a better color match with what's on the roof currently.
 
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Old 01-06-19, 04:07 PM
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Thanks - hopefully the sheeting / boards aren’t rotting - I think I would have been told about that, as they did replace some bad boards in other areas.

I took a closer look and the droop seems to line up right about with where the molding should be holding the edge of the shingles up. There’s quite an elaborate molding attached to the fascia, so the shingles actually extend a good 3 inches beyond the fascia.

I have some pictures but can’t seem to be able to upload from my phone.

 
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Old 01-08-19, 10:19 AM
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Here are the pictures - note where the fascia is at the bottom of the roof related to where the droop seems to start (drew a line in there for reference) - pretty extreme overhang from the fascia boards to the edge of the roof. I'm pretty sure there are probably rotted or compromised rafter ends to deal with, but the real primary issue is the collapsed molding.

Would it be easier / harder in this situation to actually cut back some of the overhang? From the outside it seems like the large wide molding attached to the fascia was supporting the entire edge of the roof - now that that's collapsed I think the roofers actually put a bit of extra length on the roof (to line up with the collapsed & now flattened molding). Once the molding is secured upright I think the roof line would actually pull back an inch or two.

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Last edited by PJmax; 01-09-19 at 11:03 PM. Reason: cropped/resized pics
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Old 01-08-19, 10:32 AM
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Wow I can't believe the roofers install the shingles over that. I was thinking the overhang you referred to was where the gutter is. Hard to tell without a clearer pic of the rotten molding but you might be able to replace it without removing the shingles although they would need to be nailed to the new wood.
 
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Old 01-08-19, 02:53 PM
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The whole rake edge has collapsed. Normal construction of the rake edge is a ladder type frame nailed to the last roof rafter and then additionally supported by the roof decking. Could be the roofers replaced the roof decking on the rake edge by cutting all the decking along the last roof rafter so the support of staggered roofing decking joints is lost. Need to get the rake edge back into position before the shingles are stretched.
 
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Old 01-08-19, 04:20 PM
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Well, a collapsed rake edge certainly doesn’t sound good, but this droopy condition existed on the old roof as well (pic in 1st post), so I don’t think it was caused by the roofers (although roofing over whatever issue exists wasn’t cool).

Since the drooping shingles line up with the fascia, can the rake edge & fascia board / molding be replaced without ripping up the entire line of eave-edge shingles?
 

Last edited by salinity; 01-08-19 at 04:41 PM.
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Old 01-08-19, 04:34 PM
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In a lot of old houses, the rake was poorly constructed in the first place, so it's no surprise yours is dilapidated. Back when most houses had wood shingles, the decking consisted of 1x8s... and they extended the decking past the last rafter (directly over the exterior wall) cantilevering it the last foot or so. Fascia was installed. Then crown moulding was usually applied to the fascia. Looks to me like the crown moulding is the part on your house that has rotted.

This isn't something a roofer would ever fix... nor would you want them to. You would need to get a carpenter to fix it.
 
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Old 01-08-19, 04:46 PM
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Thanks for this info - this sounds precisely like the situation we’re facing (luckily the contractor next door is a carpenter).

If it is the molding & possibly some or all of the fascia, how is something like this usually addressed (how much of the new roof has to come apart)?
 
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Old 01-08-19, 05:00 PM
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About 3 feet all the way up... it will have to be stairstepped, so 3 feet on average...
 
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Old 01-09-19, 06:01 AM
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Is some of the rake edge boxed in. Looks like in one of the pics with the last 6-12 inches cantilevered. Maybe the last 6-12 inches of the roofing can be cut off an inch beyond the box section and a drip edge installed?
 
  #16  
Old 01-09-19, 08:37 AM
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I don’t think the rake edge is boxed in, but I’m not really sure - the edge of the roof looks like it was “supported” by a large crown molding attached to the fascia.

i was thinking of exploring a similar route to eliminate the need for an elaborate molding and possibly sistering a smaller molding along the fascia to support a drip edge etc (presuming the fascia isn’t completely rotted as well.
 
  #17  
Old 01-09-19, 04:50 PM
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Can you get a closeup pic of the underside of the problem rake edge?
 
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Old 01-09-19, 06:46 PM
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I can try, but it’s way up there. I can definitely see the underside of the drip edge on some parts where the crown molding has rotted and fallen away (roofing nails driven right into the air!).

to be clear, the entire edge of the gable roof up both sides) is the problem edge.
 
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Old 01-09-19, 10:27 PM
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sal...hard to see what might/not work and what is/not rotten....if it were mine, I would hesitate to rip up the new roof. Be tempted to try and cut the edge back, then support it with moldings on 2xs running parallel to the roof edge and consider attaching/supporting those to the house via wooden/metal L brackets that might add a little style...
 
  #20  
Old 01-10-19, 08:26 AM
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Get your carpenter friend to come up with a solution. He can see what we can't.
 
  #21  
Old 01-10-19, 10:51 AM
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Thanks all - definitely won't know what's what until the carpenter gets up there to poke around, but it's helpful to hear the feedback and ideas here. I certainly like the idea of not ripping up the brand new roof if I can get around it, so that will definitely be suggested. I'll try to update / take pictures / post the ultimate solution once the work gets underway in the spring.
 
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Old 01-11-19, 06:38 AM
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If you live where snow falls, I would not wait until spring to address the problem. The shingles are not elastic and once stretched will not lay flat As a temporary fix, have your carpenter friend install a 2x4, supported by 2x4 triangular braces attached to the wall, at the outer end of the overhang.
 
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