Cabin Roof Framing Plan

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Old 01-30-19, 04:49 PM
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Cabin Roof Framing Plan

Hey y'all
First time poster here.
I have a fun project I am working on; a derelict 1950's homestead cabin in the Mojave Desert. Currently is just 4 cinder block walls. First thing I want to do is put a roof on it. Simple slight pitch design, room for insulation, small skylight and a big overhang off the front.
Here is a drawing I did of how I want it look, but I need help from the pro's (you guys) on rafter layout etc etc.
Let me know what you think!
Best wishes
Mojave Bill

 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:11 PM
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First thing of note... it's California. You likely have codes, and we don't know what they are. For instance, most homes in California have energy codes... requirements on how much insulation is required. This will partially determine the type of roof, depth of rafter, type of insulation, etc.

So you would be wise to start with the permit office in the county in which you reside and see what their energy requirements are for roofs.
 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:15 PM
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Thanks XSleeper!
It is a recreational cabin so it is not needed to be up to code as it is not a residence.
Plans do still have to be submitted to the county but these cabins go under a much looser set of guidelines. Insulation isn't even necessary but I want it!
 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:29 PM
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I have never spent time in the Mojave. Are there any weather concerns other than hot in summer? I assume you are able to drive to the cabin so transportation isn't a huge issue.
 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:37 PM
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Hey Pilot Dane
VERY hot summers, a few days rainfall a year, never any snow, a few freezing nights in the winter. High winds from time to time.
Good dirt roads to the cabin.
 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:37 PM
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If you have a lumberyard in the area (not box store) I would take your floor plan to them. They likely have a structural engineer who will be qualified to assist you in coming up with a plan and materials list.

You will need to ensure that your existing top plate is well anchored and not rotten. Current codes dictate that wood that attaches to concrete should be pressure treated. So I guess it's up to you if you want to replace that top plate or not.

Your roof should likely have a minimum 1:12 pitch. That means you will need to build an endwall that is about 18" tall PLUS the height of your rafters. This wall will need solid blocking on the top 12" or so for your joist hangers. Your rafters should likely consist of I-joists and they could be on 24" centers. The top end of the I-joists can sit in saddle hangers like these. The bottom end will sit on your existing top plate. You will place solid blocking (made of I-joists) between them on the front end to keep them plumb and you will need to fasten everything as the mfg recommends. In addition you may want to strap them with Simpson strapping or hurricane ties to prevent wind uplift.
 
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Old 01-30-19, 05:56 PM
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Thanks so much XSleeper
The top plate definitely needs replacing. Can the anchors be reused with a new pressure treated plate or do I need to fix in new ones?
 
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Old 01-30-19, 06:02 PM
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Well, if that was in rural Nebraska, the anchors would be shot. Ice and freeze-thaw cycles would have obliterated the masonry walls and loosened the concrete around the anchors. In the desert, you might be lucky... *IF* you can get the old nuts off without twisting the bolts off. You will definitely want a cordless 3/4" impact wrench.

Worst case scenario is you cut them off, drill new holes and epoxy new bolts in nearby.
 
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Old 02-06-19, 09:39 PM
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Good news! The anchors are reusable.i am replacing the rotten 2x6 with new pressure treated lumber next week. Should I use some sort of adhesive as well as the anchors to make the seal between the wood and the block even better?
 
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Old 02-06-19, 09:55 PM
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They make rolls of foam sill sealer you could put down first.
 
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