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Advice on re-roofing an 10 x 16 shed and I am a total novice

Advice on re-roofing an 10 x 16 shed and I am a total novice

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  #1  
Old 02-22-19, 03:32 PM
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Advice on re-roofing an 10 x 16 shed and I am a total novice

We have a 20-year-old Dutch bard shed that is 10 x 16. (Each side of roof has 2 surfaces - thatís a Dutch barn?)


A few years ago I think a branch hit one side edge of the roof. Some metal side edging came off. Since then when it rains The inside wall has some water running down it.

So with that in the fair amount of moisture to growing on the roof I decided Iím gonna do something about it.
I tried figuring out what was going on but pretty much ignored it.

Because of the age I guess i& itís in a shaded area I have a pretty good amount of moss growing on the roof also. And the shingles are curling / not as thick as some I saw a roofer put on our house roof.

I pulled off some of the shingles near the leak area and the underlayment plywood was rotted away as was the 2 x 4 on the side wall. And some of the side wall itself.

I tarpped it for the winter and now wonder About roofing it.

they used heavy staples to hold the shingles in place. And they didnít have any tarpaper or other material in there Just shingles on top of plywood.

Any recommendations on what to use and a ballpark cost to reroof a 10 x 16Ď Dutch born roof?

Would you use tarpaper? Something more exotic as an underlayment ? Ridge vent? Itís unheated but just for ventilation would that help? Thereís 2 gable vents - 1 on each end.

Iíd like to do the roof right & build in more margin for error for my first roofing job but I keep thinking about the cost to do it versus a new shed. I think I can replace the rotted 2x4s. & I Think I can cut out just the rotted couple square feet of rotted T111 board but will a new piece will match up? ( is that the right name for the board with the vertical grooves in it?) the shed Is in the back of the property so itís not critical to match 100% but Iíd like it not to be a hack job.

Everything else about the shed is good.




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  #2  
Old 02-23-19, 03:42 AM
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I think you are referring to a gambrel type roof.
It's almost always better to replace T-111 siding in whole pieces or at least from the top to the bottom. Besides having any discrepancies showing a patch piece is hard to seal adequately without using flashing. I'd use tar paper. It might not be required on the steep part of the roof but would be needed on the top section. Most shingles take 3 bundles to cover 100 sq ft of roof.
 
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Old 02-23-19, 05:55 AM
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Since you state info indicating a stickler for detail (other than fixing a leaky roof) I would strip the shingles, repair damaged areas, then re-roof.Twenty year old shingles are ready for retirement, especially those that have curled. Since labor is the big part of the cost of a re=roofing job (assume you are doing the work yourself) I would splurge on using roofing felt under the new shingles and a full piece of T1-11(eliminate having mismatched grooves). I would only install a ridge vent if the inside of the shed tends to stay damp (not including leaking roof).
 
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Old 02-23-19, 07:11 AM
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Thanks for the comments. Yes! Gambrel roof!

Roofing felt? OK.

Overall, what would you say the margin of error for leaks on a 1st time DIY roof job is? ie how forgiving is the 'system' to mistakes?

They used some sort of staple to secure the shingles. I am used to seeing nails. I was thinking of getting a harbor freight air gun type of nailer / stapler if not too expensive? or the heads of roofing nails are too big for homeowner grade nailers?

The underlayment - that's OSB, right? good enough for a shed? Replace it all? or just the damaged section?

Theres that metal edging that got damaged. Attached is a picture from an undamaged area. Again, what's your opiniion on how forgiving the system is to leaks? I'd hate to go through all the effort and cost and have it leak again. At some point, I did throw some caulk around the edges / shingles where I thought the water was coming in. but that didn't eliminate it.
 
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Old 02-23-19, 07:18 AM
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Nails secure shingles better than staples. If I'm not mistaken they outlawed staples for shingles in fla.
IMO shingling a roof isn't all that complicated and as long as you are comfortable on a ladder and the roof you shouldn't have any issues. You need a starter row [usually shingles turned upside down] and then make sure you have the correct overlap and stagger. A shed is a great place to learn.
 
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