Water leak from top of new window


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Old 05-01-19, 05:13 AM
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Water leak from top of new window

I had a new window installed four months ago and it leaks from the top whenever there is wind-driven rain on that side of the house. I pulled the molding and drywall and it appears that the installer captured the house wrap between the windowís nailing flange and header. I know how to fix that but am worried about how wet that outer wall might be and if there is enough water coming in to cause additional water damage to the sheathing. I have already replaced the roof and all windows above the leak to rule them out as sources. Since the leak appears to be coming from between the house wrap and the sheathing, is there a way to assess how wet that wall is without pulling all the clapboards? Could wind-driven rain be coming in from under the clapboards since everything else has been fixed and I doubt we will ever find a source? Thanks in advance for any comments.
 
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Old 05-01-19, 05:46 AM
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I wouldn't worry about it being wet since occasional wetting is readily absorbed by building materials which can then dry as that moisture evaporates. Housewrap is vapor permiable so it's not like that moisture is "trapped".

But I would advise fixing the improper installation asap. The head fin of each window should be sealed directly to the sheathing with flashing tape. The housewrap is folded up like a flap on top to make this possible. Then that flap is folded back down and taped.
 
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Old 05-01-19, 02:33 PM
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Is there a drip edge above this window's external top trim?
 
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Old 05-02-19, 04:03 AM
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Leaking windows

Thank you for replies. We are chasing the contractor now to fix the installation, especially to remove the house wrap that was trapped between the window nailing flange and the header because I can see it directing water into the window. And yes, there is a drip cap. I insisted upon one even though the contractors tried to talk me out of it. And thank you for comments on the wetness in the wall. I just had $25,000 worth of water damage fixed on that wall from a leaking deck, slider, and downspout and donít need any more trouble. The deck and slider are gone and I have replaced all the windows and roof but somehow wind-driven rain is still getting into the wall. Canít figure out how.
 
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Old 05-02-19, 05:44 AM
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What kind or siding? Post a picture of that side.
 
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Old 05-05-19, 05:56 AM
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Thank you for that advice. That is what I will instruct the contractor to do.

Best regards...
 
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Old 05-05-19, 06:05 AM
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Leaking newly installed window

The siding is cedar clapboard. The window that is leaking is the one directly above the cellar door. The only items above the leaking window are two windows shown that I have had replaced to eliminate them as a source of the leaks and a brand new 50 year roof that I had installed less than one year ago. There is a peak in the roof above all the windows and I have just had that completely sealed with back rod and caulk. None of these improvements have had any impact on the wind-driven rain leak. The only thing left that I can think of is that the moisture is somehow coming in under the clapboards themselves.

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Old 05-05-19, 06:08 AM
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Yes, I insisted upon a drip edge even though the installer tried to discourage me from doing so...
 
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Old 05-05-19, 06:26 AM
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You might check to see if the back side of the drip edge lays on top of the narrow end of the clapboard below (so water can drain off the ends) or if it is recessed behind it (where water running off the ends of the drip edge could be funneled behind it).

The idea is that the siding itself would flash the drip edge from leaking behind the siding.
​​​​​​
If you were in Canada, I have heard that it is code to create end dams on all drip edge by up turning the ends 1" and notching the siding around with a vertical kerf.
 
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Old 05-06-19, 06:36 AM
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Thanks for that advice. I will have them check that when they come out, presumably this week.
 
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Old 05-08-19, 12:17 PM
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Moisture question

I recently had a new double window installed that replaced a slider that was leaking badly and that had caused significant damage to the house sheathing underneath. I also had the deck removed underneath the slider because that had also caused significant damage to the sheathing underneath the slider. I have had concerns about moisture in this particular wall of the home since and have been checking it with a pin style moisture meter. Most of the cedar clapboards on the rear of the home (North side that gets little to no sun) show moisture readings of between 16% to 18%, especially around the windows. Some windows come back in the 20%+ range. But one clapboard under the new double window is returning readings of greater than 40%. Readings along that side of the window return 15% to 19%. How concerned should I be about the greater than 40% reading in that clapboard directly under the new window's corner? The window in question is the large double window on the right on the second level nearest the right edge of the house. The corner at the lower right is where the clapboard showing the high moisture level appears. The roof on this home is less than 1 year old and all windows above the new double window were replaced four months ago and appear to have been flashed correctly. Thanks in advance.
 
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