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Replacing roof on shed - likely first of several questions <g>

Replacing roof on shed - likely first of several questions <g>

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  #1  
Old 06-03-19, 07:31 AM
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Replacing roof on shed - likely first of several questions <g>

I like to think I understand the basic concepts of putting on a new roof, but never did it before. Would appreciate help with these questions and anything else you care to offer about the situation. As much as I am relatively handy, I do wonder if I should get a new shed rather than put the money into this one or should I get someone that's done a roof before (or anyone here care to help do this for $$?).

This shed is 10 x 16'. 20 years old. I've ignored a water leak (from a branch hitting the edge?) for several years.

As you can see from the pictures, I pulled off the old (mostly moss covered <g>) shingles. there was no underlayment. A couple of the sheathing have holes and need to be replaced. Others have smaller holes and one section is made up of several smaller pieces.

q1) Based on the material - OSB? and amount of pieces to be replaced, would you just replace all of the sheathing? Don't have to worry about matching thickness of existing sheathing that way..And this will likely take me some time, so by the time I get to replacing pieces this summer, the good pieces may have gotten wet (even with the tarp).

q2) what type of sheathing material would you use?

q3) care to share thoughts on budget for material costs? Cost someone would charge to do the work?

Things I think I need?
Sheathing
Underlayment? Skip it because it's a shed? Cover all of it because it's a small area / whatever I buy will be a big enough roll to cover all of it anyway?
Starter shingles
Shingles
Cap shingles
Roofing nails
Drip edge for sides
Drip edge for lower edge (there are 2 different types of drip edge?)
Some T111
Some 2x3s

Would you use pressure treated wood?

That front area also rotted some of the 2x3s and T111. I can likely replace / reinforce the studs and siding, but my skills to make it look good aren't the best. The shingles were stapled down. I don't have a nail gun so rent / buy is another cost.

q4) not sure if you can see from the pictures but they seemed to have glued the side edges of the shingles to a furring strip covered in aluminum? In the area with water damage, that furring strip / aluminum strip is knocked off. Should I use a drip edge?

At what point do you say in your projects - yeah, I could do that repair, but it just doesn't make sense for me to do it (quality or cost wise) so I'll get a pro or get a new shed?

Overall the shed is functional. I just don't want to put lots of money into the roof then have it still leak around the edges.

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Last edited by PJmax; 06-07-19 at 07:05 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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  #2  
Old 06-03-19, 09:46 AM
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1. Most of the roof sheeting looks good so I see no reason to replace it all. I would just replace the rotten or soft areas.

2. It's a shed. I'd go back with OSB which is probably 1/2". When installing the rough side goes up to give you more traction when standing on the roof.

3. Do the math and add up the cost of all the materials. If hiring the work then get multiple quotes. I would put down an underlayment/tar paper. It's cheap insurance.

4. I would not bother with a drip edge on the sides of the roof. Because it's nearly vertical it won't function as a drip edge.

The problems with your roof are pretty minor and common. I'd fix the roof and use the shed another 20 years except next time a limb hits it... do the repair now. It's quick, simple and cheap to fix some torn shingles when done right away. Let it go for years and you add replacing rotting wood to the repair list.
 
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  #3  
Old 06-03-19, 01:23 PM
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have you considered a corrugated metal roof, cost more but goes on fairly quickly if you have a skill saw and cordless drill.
 
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Old 06-03-19, 02:25 PM
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The last pic shows a V shaped roof overhang at the front that is not visible in the other pics. Its slope carries water back to the joint where the 2 roof slopes meet. I thing the sheathing damage in this pic is a result of poor sealing in this area from rain runoff. I suggest adding a ladder framed roof overhang (width to suit your needs) at least on this end of the roof. The sheathing on the overhang should extend one or two rafters into the old roof. Stagger the joints. Make sure to use aluminum drip edge on the sloped ends (8 total)..
 
  #5  
Old 06-03-19, 03:57 PM
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Looks like a cheap store bought shed to me.
Correct me if I'm wrong because I'm not there to see it in person.
There was little over hang on the shingles. (because they did not want them blowing off going down the road).
No tar paper and likely used staples instead of nails.
Where that roof made the angle change there should have been drip cap added and installed as to seperate roofs, not bent over the angle like that because cheap three tabs always crack and fall off.
As you pointed out there should have been drip edging on all outside edges to help prevent damage.
They saved $20.00 to cost you hundreds.
I've seen it a hundred times.
 
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  #6  
Old 06-07-19, 06:38 PM
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Thanks for all the info! I wasn't subscribed to this so sorry for the delay!

Joe - it's an 'amish' made shed. We were actually out there at the place in Lancaster years ago and bought some plastic wood adirondack chairs from them also. Interesting how they use plastic woods, we chose all the pieces as different, bright colors. but they themselves are very conservative, no electric, etc. They'll make something they'd never use in their homes : )

Correct - no tar paper and yes, staples! So much for thinking amish = better quality? Or you get what you pay for. If I knew things back then, I might have bought different? Hey, the roof lasted the 20 years, but yes Pilot - if I didn't ignore it, the damage to the beams / siding wouldn't be an issue.

As for adding up the costs of the materials - my list above, am I missing anything?

Underlayment - your brand recommendation?
Starter shingles
Shingles
Cap shingles
Roofing nails
Drip edge for sides
Drip edge for horizontal edge
Some T111
Some 2x3s

tar paper/ underlayment as cheap insurnace...what would you guys use? Spend a little more and get even better insurance?

Rotten / soft areas - I'd replace the whole piece that have bad section, right? You don't cut back the rotten to good wood then replace that smaller piece? Especially because the rot is on the edges for a couple of the OSX.

Alan - I did think about corrugated metal. Don't know about it to try it though. For the others here - your thoughts? I'm looking for something I as relatively noob can do and still keep water out. But it's a shed so don't want to spend a fortune.

Beezle - yes, the roof overhangs over the front door - it's just an extension of the roof sheathing - no framing supporting it? Interesting, trying to find a stock picture on the web of that configuration 99.9% of gambrel sheds DON'T have that extended area! I just took it for granted as typical. Here's 1 picture that typifies what I have (although there's only 2 surfaces on each side of the roof, not that third short roof area.)

And you are saying just skip that? yeah, 99.9% of the ones on the web do. Andy Trying to cut non 90 degree angles on the sheathing was something I figured I'd make wavy / not look good anyway.

The ladder framed roof overhang...so the OSX sticks out evenly from top to bottom the same amount? and is supported by wood framing?! Interesting.

Other than the roof overhanging at the top center, tthe roof doesn't overhang much at all on the bottom edge or rear sides. Is that the overhang you talk about with the shingles blowing off? Or overhang of shingles over shingles? How far can the OSX hang out over the bottom / sides without support? Can / should I do that (have the front / back and bottoms overhang the shed more? For rain protection of the siding? And would plywood be better than OSX for an unsupported overhang?

Though you might not be able to tell, some of the OSX, while in good condition is actually several pieces where a single larger 1 could have been used (in the picture wiht the canoe, the left side of the shed is 3? pieces running horizontally - 1.5' high x 8' long? I just assume replace it all and save the time trying to pull out all the staples that are still in there?

Sorry for all the noob questions. I really appreciate all your help!
 
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  #7  
Old 06-10-19, 03:48 PM
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A front overhang is not necessary but it does provide some rain protection to the wall's sheathing, especially where the sheathing meets the trim. In your picture there is a light so it would be protected also. In order to have adequate nailing surface for the roof sheathing, drip edge and underside cover, it is made out of 2x4s.In your case you would make it in 4 sections nailing each section to the existing front wall/ roof framing. The roof sheathing should be installed per my earlier post.
 
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Old 06-11-19, 09:23 AM
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beezle - sorry, not following your 4 sections comment. the part of the sheathing that overhangs is 2 triangles- 1 on each side of the peak. I was thinking nailing a triangle type of frame of wood to the underside of the sheathing and 1 side of the triangle woudl be touching the side of shed. Secure that piece to the shed? More weight on the over hang to pull the sheathing down? but the triangle of wood is also attached to shed for some support of the sheathing / shingles? I did look up your ladder overhang. Are you saying to do that rather than just the triangles?
 
  #9  
Old 06-11-19, 10:16 AM
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My suggestion for the overhang is to add it to the 4 sections of the roof. The entire roof will be wider by the width of the overhang. If it was my shed, I would make the overhang width in the 4-8 inch range.
 
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Old 06-12-19, 05:00 AM
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Beezle - thank you again! Sorry if I am slow to get all of this : )

So rather than build a ladder type of extension, could simply a 2x4 laying 'flat' - sticking out 3 1/2" from the shed work? And then you cover the 2x4 with a 'facia board' for a better appearance? the sheathing would rest / be nailed into the 2x4?

The sheathing edge woudl be flush with the end of the facia board, the drip edge would cover that edge, and then the shingles extend a 1/2" ? beyond the drip edge?

I'm really surprised with all the info on the web, I can't find a simple close up cross section drawing / picture of the details of the rake edge layout to check my thinking / point to 'this is what I am thinking of'.
 
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Old 06-12-19, 04:20 PM
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I would not create an overhang by using the 4 inch side of a 2x4. The overhang will receive nails from the roof sheathing, drip edge and shingles. This is a lot of pounding. If your roof truss is 1.5 inches thick that is all a flat 2x4 would be secured by even if your nails extend beyond the truss. I think doubling up 2x4 (3 inch overhang) is a stronger construction.
 
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Old 06-12-19, 04:49 PM
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OK! I like that better. I was envisioning that (doubling up) as being like hanging a 4x4 on the side of the building / too much, but if you recommend it, that's good enough for me : ) And much easier for my skill level than trying to build that ladder extension!!!
 
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Old 06-13-19, 04:45 AM
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Nail first 2x4 layer to existing frame. Nail second 2x4 layer to first 2x4 layer.
 
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Old 06-25-19, 07:09 PM
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Beezle - would you recommend using pressure treated 2x4s for these extensions? Yes, I'll paint them, but just for a bit of extra protection? I do vaguely remember over the years hearing that pressure treated has a higher chance of warping as it dries?
 
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Old 06-25-19, 07:22 PM
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Moderator's note:

Please keep similar questions in one thread. If you want to private message individuals directly you can certainly do that as well.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 08:09 AM
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OK, I'm back!! Sorry for all the frustration I might have caused people above! I AM moving ahead with this and with asphalt shingles.

I have the shingles, plywood, nails, drip edge and roofing felt in my garage. I am doing this this and likely not even call the guy that said he'd help / do it for a good price.

I built extensions / eaves and finally finished those (made with 2 x 4s and 2x6s). Those are exposed. I suppose I could cover them with nicer 'facia' wood, but not going to. I've gotten good with repeating 'it's just a (20 year old) shed', when wondering about this or that : )

I've watched a bunch of youtube videos and wound up with some questions I'd like to ask here if you don't mind:

1) sheathing overhang - on the sides, there's no overhang / it's flush with the facia / 2x6s, right?

2) Sheathing overhang - on the bottom edge.... please see the pics below with the drip edge. A reminder - this is a gambrel roof / steep slope near the bottom edge of roof) Do I want / need to overhang the sheathing? Bend the bottom of the drip edge so water doesn't run down along the facia? I realized - too much extension and then the drip edge has nothing to nail into other than sheathing? That's not good, right?

3) the shed roofing surface is now 16 1/2" wide. I envision cutting the sheathing something like 7', 5.5' and 4' (yes, I'll make sure they end on a truss). (Just not making them something like 8. 8 and 0.5 - you want each piece to go across a couple trusses, right?)

4) the trusses are 16" on center NOMINALLY. I noticed some trusses aren't exactly the same distance from one end of the shed for that 1 truss (1 side might be 80" from one end and the other side of the truss might be 81" from that same end). So it won't line up with the plywood exactly along its entire length? I'm hoping I can just avoid nailing to that truss. And trying to unnail 1 side and move it an inch seems like a chore!!

5) I have some left over adhesive underlayment from our house roof job done last year. I was going to use that on the shed? Just start it at the bottom edge and tar paper above that with a few inch overlap?

6) The drip edge along bottom would go under the tar paper / self stick, right? And over the tar paper / self stick on the gable sides?

7) tar paper just needs a few nails to hold it? all the shingle nails will be going through it ??

8) nailing the sheathing - I think I saw 8" along the edges and 12" 'in the field'?

9) I should do a bit of planning on the layout of the vertical overlap of the shingles so it works out correctly at the slope transition, right? they might say 5" overlap, but you can play with that a little bit over each row to adjust things at the top? I envision using the self stick underlayment over the sheathing at this angle transition and the shingles flopping over the bend. Yes, people here have said that's not the right way. But I saw videos of that way, I had it that way (with no leaks / failures there) and right now, I'm trying to keep things simple.

10) I envision lots of chalk lines for nailing sheathing then horizontal lines for the shingles?

11) Back to overhangs. Shingles overhang 1/2" from sheathing on sides AND bottom?

12) Do you cut that side overhang on each shingle before nailing or once it's up? I saw videos showing both ways : )

13) Any other tips?

IF YOU GOT THIS FAR DOWN THE POST.... THANKS!!!!!!!!
 
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