Tilted fascia at eaves; what would you do?

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-12-19, 07:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 273
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Tilted fascia at eaves; what would you do?

I'm not looking for more work, but it seems to find me.
I tore off the old cracked and nasty looking wood fascia at the eave of my garage and replaced it with 1x6 PVC. The PVC looked so nice, then I realized, there is a dramatic tilt to the fascia. The bottom of the fascia tilts in toward the garage at about 1/2-3/4" out-of-plumb.
In order to make the fascia plumb, I'll need to shim out the bottom, but I don't want to create voids that will trap moisture. Also, the PVC will become wavy if there are spaces between the shims.
So, what would you do to make the fascia plumb?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-12-19, 07:40 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,771
Received 137 Votes on 129 Posts
So I assume it tilted before and you just never noticed it?

Hard to say with no photos that show the framing, but if there are any rafter tails I would cut them plumb rather than shimming anything out.
 
  #3  
Old 08-12-19, 08:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 273
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks @XSleeper. There are rafter (truss) tails. 24" on center. 2' overhang. I'm a bit concerned about how much damage I might do to the Aspenite sheathing if I tear out the existing sub-fascia. It was rather flaky in spots when I tore out the old fascia.
What you said makes sense though re: cut the tails plumb.
 
  #4  
Old 08-13-19, 01:49 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 4,050
Received 69 Votes on 62 Posts
cut the tails plumb.
Cut or rebuild, it depends on what you are faced with.

You have a roof there that is flush with the fascia, so it would need to be rebuilt back out!
 
  #5  
Old 08-13-19, 02:51 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,771
Received 137 Votes on 129 Posts
You could also just cut a continuous shim for the bottom edge that would go on top of the subfascia. It won't wave if the shim is continuous.
 
  #6  
Old 08-13-19, 04:04 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Ct.,USA
Posts: 1,092
Upvotes: 0
Received 21 Votes on 18 Posts
The ends of the trusses are not cut plumb and I assume tilt in, top to bottom. If the roof is shingled, cutting the tails vertical is not an option. If the overhang is open, you can scab (about 2 foot long) pieces to each truss, precut with a vertical end. Remember the roof shingles are supposed to overhang the fascia 1-1.5 inch. Snap a chalk line on the trusses or suspend a string end to end to use in positioning the scabbed pieces to end up with the correct overhang taking the thickness of the fascia into account.
 
  #7  
Old 08-13-19, 01:15 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 273
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
My options as I understand them.

Thank you for your ideas @XSleeper, @beezlebob, and @Marq1.

I did find a photo of the eaves opened up--actually from a different part of the house, but the same method was used throughout.

I also attached a trio of diagrams of a the fascia and its supporting structure. The first diagram shows the current situation. The second shows @XSleeper's "Continuous Shim" option. The third diagram shows @beezlebob's "scabbed" 2x option.

Please let me know if I'm interpreting what I'm reading correctly.

Thank you.
 
Attached Images     
  #8  
Old 08-13-19, 03:49 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,771
Received 137 Votes on 129 Posts
What is your plan for the soffit in the end? Because if you are redoing it go with option 2. I don't see where you mention your soffit plans anywhere.
 
  #9  
Old 08-13-19, 07:58 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 273
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
@XSleeper; I'm installing Certainteed Invisivent for the soffit. I've already done that for most of the house. I'm moving on to the garage now.
The install recommendations for Invisivent say that, for 24+ " soffits, I need a fastener in the center of every other row. So, I've been installing 2x4's very much like what we see for the "scabbed" option to give me something to fasten to. The difference is that, when I install the 2x4 blockings to give me something to fasten to, my spacing is every 20" since each Invisivent panel is 10". That does not line up well with the 24" on center trusses.
I could work with that if need be though by running additional blocking between the scabs so I could fasten the center of the Invisivent to the blocking that runs perpendicular to and between the scabs.

One reason I prefer the continuous shim option however is that I won't need to attach anything additional to the exterior face of the garage wall just to get the fascia installed. I'm going to have to re-remove the sheathing above the garage door to deal with the ant damage I described in another post. It's going to take me some time to line up the help for the header replacement, so I'm trying to make progress where I can.

Sorry if I haven't described the situation very well. I think a diagram would help, but I need to get to bed.

Thank again.
 
  #10  
Old 08-13-19, 08:08 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,771
Received 137 Votes on 129 Posts
Then definitely option 2, i would think... like you say, you could easily add your blocking on 20" centers as needed by fastening through the new straight subfascia.

if you do go with option 1, I was not imagining the shim like you have it drawn... instead about half that size. I would just run a 2x4 through a table saw at the angle needed so that it would be only 1 1/2" wide. The bottom would be (maybe) 3/4"... the top 1/2"... (or whatever it takes to make it plumb) with a void above it.. your new plumb fascia would contact the tilted subfascia at the top, but lay on the 1 1/2" wide continuous horizontal shim on the bottom.
 
  #11  
Old 08-14-19, 05:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Ct.,USA
Posts: 1,092
Upvotes: 0
Received 21 Votes on 18 Posts
First pic shows unusual construction. Load bearing walls are usually located where the common roof rafter meets the ceiling joist. In your case, the load bearing walls are 2 feet inboard of this point based on your description of the overhang. My solution was based on scabbing the plumb cut pieces to the common roof rafters, not the ceiling joists.
 
  #12  
Old 08-14-19, 07:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 273
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I have some good news. The tilted sub-fascia that resulted in a tilted fascia is limited to the first approximately 6 feet. The tilt is at the end I was starting at. When I took the new fascia down in order to deal with the issue, I checked the sub-fascia for plumb in multiple places. It's not perfect, but, like I said, it's really only the first 6 feet or so that need to be addressed.

@beelzebob, I've attached a couple of pictures that give a better view of how the truss sits atop the exterior wall.
The first picture is from inside the garage, specifically above the garage overhead door.
The second picture is a look from the outside--after I removed the old soffit and the blocking that was in place to support the soffit.
 
Attached Images   
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes