newbie shingling small roof

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Old 08-13-19, 02:56 PM
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newbie shingling small roof

I plan on shingling this small size simple roof that covers a trail sign. The area size(s) of each side of the roof measures 87" long and 32" wide. The asphalt shingles I'll be using are not the typical "three-tab" type but rather the "architectural" type. I have a total of 32 of these shingles. Also I have 16 of what are called ridge cap shingles which in their full 36" length are factory slit in evenly into three 12" sections. I plan on using these 12" ridge cap sections for the ridge cap row. Also I have been told that I can/should go ahead and use those same full 36" ridge cap shingles for the "starter strip". The photo shows my three stacks of shingles; the two top stacks are 16 each of the regular architectural shingles, and the bottom stack is the 16 ridge cap shingles. For the starter strip I plan on first cutting the ridge cap shingles lengthwise to a particular width, then installing (nailing) them along the bottom of the roof. My question at this point is what width should I cut them? I think I want a quarter inch overhang. I am inexperienced with roofing but figure if I can follow some basic instructions I should be able to handle this and have it work out. Thanks.




 

Last edited by sgull; 08-13-19 at 03:17 PM.
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Old 08-13-19, 04:36 PM
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Cut the starter tabs right under the tar strip. The tar strip will follow your bottom edge so cut them nice and straight. Then follow the shingle directions on your package. Be sure none of your starter tab butt joints are within 6" of your first course butt joints or it will leak.
 
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Old 08-13-19, 04:57 PM
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I just did my first shingle job three weeks ago for my new shed and it was quite the experience.

The job went well but it was a hot weekend so I've decided to scratch roofer off my future to do careers.

GAF has some great short videos if interested!

As noted, the tar strip is facing up at the bottom to catch the bottom of the first row of shingles to keep it locked down.

The only thing that I was not sure about architectural shingles was how to line them up, the next row overlaps the first where the shingle becomes double thick, watch the nail like so each shingle gets 8 nails (4 on original layer, then 4 from next layer)!

Overlap is recommended 1/4 to 3/4 past drip edge or in your case the wood!
 
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Old 08-14-19, 01:21 PM
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For the starter strip I plan on first cutting the ridge cap shingles lengthwise to a particular width, then installing (nailing) them along the bottom of the roof. My question at this point is what width should I cut them?
Cut the starter tabs right under the tar strip.
Now I'm curious/wondering what would be the purpose of needing to cut my starter strips (which are actually manufactured for ridge cap) lengthwise to any particular width at all. Why not just nail my entire starter shingles along the bottom edge(s) without bothering to cut them lengthwise?
 
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Old 08-14-19, 01:46 PM
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the tar strip is facing up at the bottom to catch the bottom of the first row of shingles to keep it locked down.
If you look at a true starter the tar/adhesive is right along the edge, it's to catch the un-nailed portion of the first row so that wind can not blow it up.

If you use the ridge shingles as they are that strip would be in the middle of the first row about where the nail line is so no benefit at the edge!
 
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Old 08-14-19, 01:49 PM
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Well that makes sense. Thanks Marq1.
 
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Old 08-14-19, 03:58 PM
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Now that I have the starter strip(s) cut to size lengthwise and ready to install along the bottom edge(s), I'm not too clear on how much I ought to cut off the length of the first starter shingle before installing on the bottom left side. The starter shingle is 36" long and the regular shingles that will cover the rest of the roof are also 36" long.
 
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Old 08-14-19, 04:57 PM
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I'm surprised your shingles aren't 39" long. Those must be old shingles.

you will want to cut off 6". Use the 6" pies as your first starter, the a full one.

you also cut the full starter shingle width down to 7" because of the way each successive layer lies. (Think side view) You always have a double thickness at the nailing area.
 
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Old 08-14-19, 05:08 PM
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Sorry XSleeper for the mis-information I posted earlier. Indeed the shingles do not measure 36" but actually 39 3/4". And the shingles I'm using for starter strips measure full length of 36". Dang I didn't want to confuse the issue any more than I already have. thanks for further comment
 
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Old 08-14-19, 05:11 PM
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Then cut 3" off your first starter so it's 33". Then your first 39 3/4" shingle will cover the starter butt joint by 6+.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 10:20 AM
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Cut the first starter to 33", and ready to install. Decided to have it overhang the bottom edge by about a half inch, if that's fine. Not sure how far to overhang it from the gable (rake) edge(s); I suppose about the same? Also not sure how high far down from the top edge of the starter to do my nailing, and how many nails would be adequate.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 03:41 PM
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Nailing down the center is fine.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 03:48 PM
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Okay will nail down the center. What's a good distance to overhang the rake edge(s)? Also, think it very necessary to run starter strip(s) along the rake(s) too?
 
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Old 08-15-19, 04:08 PM
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1/4" or 1/2", doesn't really matter. I don't run it on the rake, i use metal edge . Some do it.
 
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Old 08-15-19, 04:55 PM
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length of the starter is really unimportant, as long as you dont have seams/joints on top of each other that is the key!
 
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Old 08-16-19, 12:32 PM
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After completing to this point on one side of my little roof, I suppose next step would be go ahead now and just trim off that excess shingle portion, nice and even at the peak there, then continue installing full shingles going from left to right, trimming those down at the peak just the same also as I install? (Two photos below showing same situation from different views.)



 
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Old 08-16-19, 04:03 PM
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Correct. If its <6 from the peak to to bottom of your nailing strip, your ridge cap will cover that.

I would have thought you would have put some metal drip edge on this but I guess this isn't the Taj mahal.
 
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Old 08-16-19, 04:29 PM
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I guess this isn't the Taj mahal.
Correct. ^

I'll go double check the exact measurement from the peak to the bottom of the nailing strip.
 
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Old 08-16-19, 05:41 PM
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Taj Mahal or not, I'd give you a passing grade. Good job! I wouldn't have even considered skipping the drip edge, but since you did I would definitely paint the exposed edges of sheathing, especially along the rakes because those exposed ends will soak the moisture right up. I had a guy tell me one time that silver was real good for exposed ends because it's so thin and runny that it wicks into the grain good. I don't know how true it is, and of course that same characteristic makes it messy to work with, especially up high like that. Looking at the pitch, not something I would normally do, but I think I might leave the top course on one side long, bend it over, and see how the caps would lay down on it. If the caps didn't lay down right you could cut the shingles back then, but my thinking is that it might give the bend in the caps a bit more radius and maybe they would last a little longer.
 
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Old 08-16-19, 06:35 PM
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The measurement from the peak to the bottom of the nailing strip is 3 1/2". So I've trimmed the top rows of shingles on each side at the peak and should be good to go then with ridge caps next. My plan in that regard, as I mentioned in my initial post this thread, is I have 16 of what are called ridge cap shingles which in their full 36" length are factory slit in evenly into three 12" sections. I plan on using these 12" ridge cap sections for the ridge cap row. Actually I'm a rather unclear on the proper method to install these too (of course!) so will be "researching" that now. Any advice/comments on that appreciated too.

I think I might leave the top course on one side long, bend it over, and see how the caps would lay down on it
Dang, too late. I already trimmed down both sides to the peak before I saw that post.
 
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Old 08-16-19, 06:44 PM
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To put on ridge cap, find the center of your peak... measure down 6" on each end. Snap a chalk line on the shingles from end to end... then follow the chalk line on one side as you install them. (Just cover the line)

As you go to put one on, pre-bend it in your hands (do not crease it like it's a piece of paper) just bend, over bend, bend it back, so that when you flop it on the roof it's got the right shape to it. (This obviously works best on a nice sunny day, not when it's -20 in the winter) then put 2 nails in it about 6" back from the leading edge. Your "reveal" is 5". So on an 87" (call it 90") roof you will need 18 individual cap shingles (6 full shingles).

Your last cap shingle will be face nailed and you can caulk the nail heads if you want, but I bet you won't need to on this project...
 
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Old 08-16-19, 08:48 PM
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Thanks XSleeper for those helpful clear ridge cap instructions.

you will need 18 individual cap shingles (6 full shingles).
Well I counted and I happen to have 11 full cap shingles , so apparently have more than enough on hand. Good.

I wouldn't have even considered skipping the drip edge, but since you did I would definitely paint the exposed edges of sheathing, especially along the rakes because those exposed ends will soak the moisture right up.
I can paint the exposed edges of the sheathing. I will mention first however that the plywood is the weather-treated type so maybe not necessary?

I had a guy tell me one time that silver was real good for exposed ends because it's so thin and runny that it wicks into the grain good. I don't know how true it is, and of course that same characteristic makes it messy to work with, especially up high like that.
Not sure where I'd even get such "silver" but could consider looking to acquire it if it's true it could be significantly better than just paint. And actually it's not particularly up all that high and not a lot to do. I do have some "end-cut solution", I wonder if I should consider that at all for the exposed plywood edges. Any further comment in that regard appreciated.

Looking at the pitch, not something I would normally do
Yeah it is what it is, now. It works, and I guess doesn't look too bad for what it is, but If I were to do over I would definitely not build it so steep.

Your last cap shingle will be face nailed and you can caulk the nail heads if you want, but I bet you won't need to on this project...
I know, because it's not the taj Mahal.

Taj Mahal or not, I'd give you a passing grade.
Okay good to know I passed at least.
 
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