Wicking shingles on low pitch roof

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Old 10-27-19, 06:50 PM
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Wicking shingles on low pitch roof

New roof a year ago and it was a 3 layer tare off on this section of the home. I guess you could call it a 4 inch and we noticed stain streaks in a small two foot section of our foundation wall a few months ago and after some research I found out it was due to water getting into the soffit then back behind the siding and all the way down the wall of the house and to the foundation... (I actually posted about this in another section in the summer because we had a very unfortunate time trying to get a hold of the roofer and are currently still trying to find him but did find out that he is not bonded anymore as of 2017.)
Anyway. after being told by 3 different contractors 3 different ideas of what our problem is from us missing out fascia which we are not to our "gutter stuff" causing the over flow which it isnt. I had to search more myself and found a video of a guy explaining that if the pitch is to shallow we'll call it, then water can wick back under the first row of shingles and sit there and relax and if there is an overlap in the I&W than it can then make it between there then down between the decking (old house so we have slats) and into the soffit. I think I actually confirmed this the first time I looked on the roof months ago when I saw water under the shingles days after raining even, so It has to be doing this "wicking" right? then seeping through an overlap in the I&W? Now to my question, rather that spending $3k doing a tare off and rebuilding the deck so it flows better is there any possible chance I can stop this wicking with blackjack? Sorry this was so long I just wanted to explain as much as possible. I honestly would like to find this scum roofer who did the job but his registered address doesnt even belong to him and he has blocked our number and all attorneys want money up front. So right now we are trying to stop further water damage. thanks for any input.
 
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  #2  
Old 10-28-19, 03:41 AM
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Water will always take the path of least resistance.

If you are finding water under the shingles, or behind the facia it's more than likely coming from above not being "wicked" from the bottom!
 
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Old 10-28-19, 05:00 AM
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There should be aluminum drip edge at the bottom of the roof installed to the roof sheathing before the shingles were installed. Its purpose is twofold. One is to create a drain path for any wicked runoff water and second to prevent runoff water getting behind the fascia board. A picture of your roof edge with the problem would be helpful.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 05:40 AM
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With next to no info it's hard to help. Low slope could mean anything, so what is the exact pitch of the roof? Shingles should not be used if it's under 2:12. If it's between 2:12 and 4:12, the felt underlayment should have been lapped 19" so as to provide double coverage. There is no way for us to know how the roofer did it. We don't even know if the roofer used underlayment, ice and water shield or metal edging. We don't know if the top where it meets the house is flashed properly. It's pretty hard to diagnose a roof leak sight unseen from 2000 miles away.

If a roof is leaking, it probably needs to be redone correctly sooner rather than later. If the slope is less than 2:12 you shouldn't be using shingles.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 09:18 AM
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I find this scenario very confusing.

Could you explain "after some research I found out it was due to water getting into the soffit", what was the research you did.
Did you pull the soffit and confirm that there is water there?

It would have to be wicking large amounts of water and that does not make sense.
Also you said I&W was used. I do not know what they used but the stuff I used was self stick and very rubbery.
It would seal any nails and also stuck to the plywood so that no water would be able to run under it.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 10:03 AM
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Id say it's slightly < 2/12, it was an addition to the home 30 years after it was built back in 1960. We didn't have any issues until after the new roof. I'll get some pictures when i get home later. By "wicking" I mean the water gets to the edge of shingles, majority runs off into gutter but because the slope is so low some of it "wicks" back under the edge of the shingles. There is a drip edge down first then above that is the I&W which I think is code but I think I actually read it better to run the I&W under the drip edge and cover the edge of the fascia as well. Either way there is what it seems to be wicking here and causing leaking into soffit. Can I just blackjack that row of shingles down?
By research I mean Google searching "streaking stains on foundation wall"
 
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Old 10-28-19, 02:30 PM
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I always put the drip edge under the I&W.
Then if water does get under the shingles, it runs over the I&W and into the gutters.
If it was the other way it would run over the I&W then under the drip edge onto the facia.

You could blackjack them down.
I do not know if it will help but I cannot think of why it would hurt so nothing ventured nothing gained applies.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 05:48 PM
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The water gets behind the siding and runs down the wall then soaks into the sill plate and into the basement. Gutter drains just fine and it only happens in this 2ft area. no other visible stains and the siding is metal and not vented. the soffit also has a small pitch on it away from the house as well. Here are some pictures I just took. The flashing up at at the steep of that side of the roof where it meets the second story overlaps the shingles and appears to have a heavy bead of caulk as well and is under an over hang. I honestly dont know what else could cause water to make it behind the siding. The only change was the new roof. the last photo is to give an idea of the pitch.
 
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Old 10-30-19, 06:30 AM
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Location of stain on foundation does not indicate location of leak vertically or horizontally since the water will take path of least resistance. What do you mean when you say there is an overhang where the lean-to roof meets the main house since the rake edge fascia of the lean-to meets the rake edge fascia of the main house. Since the leak started after re-roofing the lean-to I would think the sealing of the new roof where the two fascia's meet are suspect areas. It is unusual to me to see use of vented material for overhang cover on lean-to rake edge. Was it like this before the lean-to re-roof?
 
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Old 11-03-19, 10:58 AM
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The word I was looking for I guess is "sidewall" where the roof meets the rest of the house. I found out today that we think the leak is in fact coming from the sidewall flashing. In the general area above the leak no caulk was used for some reason and instead it appears to be a rubber gasket material almost like an inner tube and about 1/2 sticks out and curls up and had water sitting in it. This side also faces north so I guess with wind and rain the water can force itself under this loose flashing then travel all the way down the roof between the shingles and synthetic underlayment. No stains on ceiling inside so that's good news but I think we're just going to replace this 10ft section of flashing and recaulk. Does any of this sound right?
 
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Old 11-03-19, 04:53 PM
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Unfortunately the last pic you provided doesn't show the areas of where the lean-to re-roof meets the old roof (2 places). .Hard to help when I can't see what you can. I think this is the area your last post was referring to.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 06:36 PM
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The stains on the flashing are from leaves that were sitting there about a month ago but have since been removed. Here are 2 pictures closer to the sidewall flashing where we now think the water is getting in.



side note to any mods: how can I remove pictures from old posts? I didnt know there was a limit so I had to use a link for the following.




 
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Old 11-05-19, 04:33 PM
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I am not a roofer or carpenter. However I think the new roof installation to the vertical wall should be something like this. Flashing (1foot wide, 6 " up vertical wall and under the bottom clapboard, 6'' on lean to roof) should be laid before the last full width shingle is placed on lean-to roof. The next row of shingles should be bent so part is on lean-to roof and part on the vertical wall. Nail shingles to vertical wall. Cover part of shingle on vertical wall with trim board and/or flashing. Caulk joint to vertical wall as needed. Do you know how the re-roof was installed short of taking off the trim at the intersection?
 
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Old 11-05-19, 05:50 PM
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They did not replace that flashing. From what I can tell they pried the edge up, shoved the last row of shingles under the edge then nailed it back down. there are small dabs of "goop" over the nail spots. then along the edge of the flashing is this rubber gasket material. I dont know if they placed it or if it was there before.

So you are saying there should be another layer of shingles on top of the flashing as well that cover both the roof and sidewall like the shape of an "L" ? if viewed from the side.
 
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Old 11-05-19, 06:05 PM
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No. That's not the way it's done.

Apart from the rubber gasket material (no idea what that is), it looks like everything was done correctly... or at least good as possible. If you get a bunch of leaf trash sitting on a low pitch roof like that it could easily cause water to back up. So keep the roof clean.

If there was a 3 layer tearoff, I don't see how that could possibly be the original wall flashing.
 
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Old 11-05-19, 10:35 PM
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I'm positive on both the 3 layer tare off and not replacing that flashing. I can see where it had been damaged from being pried up then being hammered back down. That is probably why there is such a big gap and why water is so easily getting in there. We are set to replace it this coming weekend.
 
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