Putting in a long drainage pipe from downspout

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Old 02-22-20, 10:50 AM
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Putting in a long drainage pipe from downspout

I'm having some problems with downspout drainage. The downspout is just to the side of steps leading up to a front door, in a bed alongside the foundation. The bed is 5-6' wide to where it changes to a gently sloped lawn. When I had the gutters/downspouts replaced a year or so ago I'd mentioned that the flow from the existing downspout tends to flood onto a landing at the bottom of the steps; they redirected the flow about 6' away, which just changes where the problem is--in the attached picture you can see the wash. I'd like to relocate the water down to the far end of the house, which would be about 36' feet away.

One problem, as shown in the first pic, is that a sprinkler valve box sits right next to the foundation about 1/3 of the way over, so I can't simply put a pipe in a trench the whole way along the foundation. A red arrow in the second picture shows the valve box's position.

Another solution would be a pipe along where the landscaping timbers are in the second picture (between the grass and the bed). I've dug in there a bit (when putting those timbers in) and there are roots from the nearby shrubs; I don't think I can make a trench without harming the plants.

Lastly, there's along the driveway. Problem is, there are sprinkler heads there, so at the least I'd have to dig the trench away from the driveway. Also, with that valve box there above the heads, at least some might be in the way leading down from the top of the hill (perpendicular to the drainage pipe)..

If I ran it along the foundation, I'd have to first run PVC pipe well above the ground so that it easily clears the valve box--high enough that the box can be accessed/served (or have the piece above it be removable). From there it could go into the ground the rest of the way. From the left of the valve box to where the far (left) corner of the house is the ground drops almost 10" total, so I wouldn't have to keep digging progressively deeper to maintain a slant .I'm not sure about the root situation here.

My main question is: should I be using 3" DWV PVC pipe, or corrugated black drain pipe? Obviously the flexible would be cheaper, but I'm thinking it's easier to keep a consistent pitch with the PVC. Also, I'm concerned that if I used the route along the driveway, I don't know that I can put the corrugated pipe in deep enough that the weight of foot traffic above it wouldn't collapse the pipe--I know it's meant to be buried, but not sure about the specs needed so that it isn't crushed.

The other question is, is there some simpler solution I'm overlooking? There may be some obvious detail I hadn't thought to mention (something you'd know when you see it in person), so if any clarification is needed, please point it out.
 
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Old 02-22-20, 12:58 PM
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Can you move the downspout to the other side of the steps or someplace in that direction?
 
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Old 02-22-20, 02:33 PM
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From the far left of the house where you say the ground drops 10" where would the water flow from there? The picture looks like the driveway slopes from the back to the front. I.e. if you let a water hose run on the driveway does it run to the back or to the front?

I've used both corrugated and 4" solid pipe. Unless there is no other way I'll always use the solid. Easier to set slope, easier to clean, less chance of clogging. I'll use short length of flex pipe only if necc. Don't worry about flex pipe collapsing under weight of foot traffic if you use it.

Don't use DWV use solid drainage pipe, it has all the same adapters.

Ex: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Advanced...0010/100135310
 
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Old 02-24-20, 07:33 AM
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The driveway slopes down from back to front--i.e., it would flow towards you from the POV of the picture--basically, the opposite of the ground's slope along the foundation (you can sort of see the grassy area leveling as it goes further into the background as the difference in height lessens).

At the far left/top corner you can just see a tree. In that area is a steep drop off, maybe 1' lower than the end of the driveway, which is itself lower than the foundation. I'd run the drainage line into this area, with a diagonal line maybe 6' or more from the foundation corner.

The main problem is how to run it from that downspout to the area it's going to drain. It would have been simple to run it along the foundation but for that valve box.

Thanks for the link; I'd completely missed that looking at HD.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 07:41 AM
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Can you move the downspout to the other side of the steps or someplace in that direction?
Not possible, I'm afraid. The steps are on a corner of the house. I can't go over them, and it would be a total nightmare running under them--not only is there the concrete of the steps but the ground on the right has a bed that's higher than the left and is densely planted with yews. Plus there'd be nowhere to run it after getting it across.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 08:09 AM
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If I understand correctly the best drain area would be to the left of the house.
I do not know why they did not slope your drains that way to start with but there must be a reason.

I can think or a couple options.

Looks like your landscape timbers could use some work as there seems to be some wash out of the soil.
So I would re-align them then put another coarse on top of the existing timbers.
With no ends directly over the lower coarse.
Then drill through both and dive a 3 or 4 foot rod through then into the soil avery few feet.
Rebar would work
Then hide your drain piping behind that.
If you have to dig down some .
You do not seem to have damaged the shrubs when you put in the timbers so I doubt you would damage them here.
OR
Run the drain along the foundation above ground.
I would use the white PVC pipe for this.
I would support it with 2X4's or 2X6's driven into the ground so you do not have to attach it to the house.
Looks like you should be able to get enough slope and still get into the sprinkler box.

 
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Old 02-24-20, 08:54 AM
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i'd started to hammer through the timbers, but then I realized that I didn't know for sure where the sprinkler lines were or how deep (the valve box is right there, so they don't start very deep)

As I'd said, the washout is only right where the downspout drain is--it's not generally washing out, just where the water is pouring from the downspout, thus why I want to redirect it. And again, I couldn't dig down under the timbers: too many roots from living shrubs there, which is why I only did the one level. Just barely sinking them I had to fudge their position because of all the roots.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 09:02 AM
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Possibly consider running it underground straight from the downspout to where the driveway meets the entrance walk, then turning under that small concrete pad. That would bring it down slope on the near side of that walkway (to prevent it from pooling on the walkway as it has been doing) where you could daylight it or continue underground further. Not sure what is further towards the front (street?). Looks like the yews are on the upper portion of the grass. Replacing the concrete pad might be easier than trenching it all the way to the back and all the issues/risks that entails.

Where I live the the less trenching I do he better. Concrete is an easy fix, especially a small area such as yours.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 09:18 AM
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That concrete pad is about 18" thick. As part of a street drainage project the town took out the previous driveway, which was another two steps down from that pad, and replaced it with the existing one, which is level with it. The pad's concrete goes all the way down and below where the old driveway was, those two steps down.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 10:20 AM
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Yep, you're left with no good options.

It would have been simple to run it along the foundation but for that valve box.
If you believe it would be simple, then consider moving the valve box out 6"-8". Dig around it to see where the pipes run in/out and see if that is possible. Re-plumbing a box, though a hassle is not too difficult. Maybe you'll luck out and have the pipes orient themselves to your advantage.
 
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Old 02-28-20, 06:39 AM
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I'd change the slop of the gutter and put another down spout at the other end of the house. It's not that hard to do!
 
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Old 02-29-20, 05:10 AM
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I'd change the slop of the gutter and put another down spout at the other end of the house. It's not that hard to do!
Not possible. The gutter is on a horizontal run at the bottom-right of a very tall inverted V (also draining the right side of the inverted V). Moving it to the other end would just meant getting it maybe ten feet further--not even enough to clear the valve box. (image below is a quick sketch; not to scale)

 
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Old 02-29-20, 05:23 AM
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If you believe it would be simple, then consider moving the valve box out 6"-8". Dig around it to see where the pipes run in/out and see if that is possible. Re-plumbing a box, though a hassle is not too difficult. Maybe you'll luck out and have the pipes orient themselves to your advantage.
You know, this has made me think: maybe it's possibly to do a run AROUND the box while leaving it in place. Run it to the box, then do 90 degrees away from the foundation, another 90 degrees around the front of the box, then 90 degrees back towards the foundation, then 90 to run back along the foundation wall. The main reason to get it back near the foundation would be to avoid the shrubs. There are the lines out from the valve box, but they wouldn't be any higher than the lines going in, so if I keep the drain line near the surface it might be OK. The only problem would be if the valve box needed to be serviced (I had a crack in the manifold last year and had to dig up all around the box to replace it).

The other trick would be figuring out what sort of slope I'd need.
 
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Old 02-29-20, 09:36 AM
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I would think that is just a clog waiting to happen. And if it happens, good luck getting it cleaned out.
 
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Old 02-29-20, 11:44 AM
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Could always put in a tee and a cleanout adapter. Or two.


 
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Old 03-06-20, 07:31 AM
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Reassessment...

I was just out digging the trench along the longer side of the valve box. The way over the valve box is doable--the way I see it, I'll need one of the connectors below, otherwise I don't think I can pass the pipe far enough above the valve box to make it accessible. With the connectors I can make a removable section in case I need to access the box--or the nearby metal water supply, which comes out of the foundation about 6" above and to the side of the valve box before going underground.

That means the section on the right--the part from the downspout to the valve box will have to be suspected above ground. I think I'll have to dig for a couple of posts to attach it to--I'd rather not drill into the foundation, and there's no way the downspout can take the weight.

 

Last edited by vanderdecker; 03-06-20 at 09:59 AM.
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