When to replace shingle roof

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Old 08-14-20, 02:12 PM
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When to replace shingle roof

House is 21 years old and has basic asphalt type shingles. Ive been on the roof and did not see evidence of cracked, split, raised, missing, or curled shingles. From the attic I have a clear view of the roof sheathing and see no leaks. I live in coastal North Carolina so it sees a lot of heat in the summer. Just went through Hurricane Isaias with no roof issues. We were less than a mile from where it came onto land. We did have a few torn shingles two years ago from another hurricane. I replaced them as best I could. No leaks there either.

Anyway, I intend to replace the shingles when it is time but do not care to do so any earlier than necessary. How do I tell when it is time?
 
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Old 08-14-20, 03:53 PM
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By "basic" shingles you mean 3 tab shingles and there the original shingles your on borrowed time.
Check the shingles for areas where the granuals have worn off, most often you'll see it on the cap edges and the lower edges.
Try lifting the tabs, if there no longer stuck down tight to the roof there shot.
 
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Old 08-14-20, 03:56 PM
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If its not leaking and appears to be in good shape then it depends on whether or not the appearance bothers you. If none of the shingles are starting to curl... There are no bare or worn spots, and an inspection reveals no leaks, and no signs of leaks near soffits, eves, valleys, pipe boots, etc... Let it ride as long as you want. If it ain't broke don't fix it.
 
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Old 08-14-20, 04:11 PM
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I used to love it when people would let there roof go to long, most would say, well it's not leaking.
If you wait until it's leaking, then it's way to late.
Now your dealing with having to replace the sheathing at least, if not the insulation, sheet rock, and dealing with mold issues.
 
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Old 08-14-20, 05:03 PM
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Worst roof I ever worked on, you could see the tar paper and plywood in a few spots. They figured it was the original roof on this duplex, about 35 yrs old. The shingles were curled up and crispy like potato chips, a pitchfork did nothing but obliterate them. Worst job ever... I had to shovel it into garbage bags to get it in the dumpster, because the biggest pieces were maybe 3" around. Amazingly the plywood was fine. If it was osb it would have been moldy and rotten.

So yeah. Obviously there is a point at which you replace it. OP stated he has a clear view from inside the attic and no leaks.

Best tearoff ever was on a modular home where they used wide staples on 3/8" plywood decking. Staples were loose from freeze thaw cycles and the shingles were stuck together so well that you could grab the bottom shingle, lift up on it, and you would "unzip" an entire row that was stair stepped up the roof. I think it took me less than an hour to tear off each half of that roof. Just dragged row after row of of melted together shingles right to the edge of the roof and into the dumpster. One of the few times I ever felt like I was getting paid handsomely on a job.
 
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Old 08-15-20, 04:55 AM
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If you are not the original owner to know age of shingles, I would guess they are 21 years old. Most asphalt shingle manufacturers have some type of warranty for 20-40 years. While there may be some life left in the shingles, waiting until they leak is not good planning as others have posted. Don't know where you reside, but there are locations where it could be too hot/cold/raining to replace shingles at the first sign of a leak. My suggestion is to replace the shingles ASAP.
 
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Old 08-15-20, 06:00 AM
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I respect your points regarding waiting for a leak. Too late and too much damage to justify waiting. I will proceed this fall.

Two questions.

First, I am interested in the solar reflective shingles. Are they worth it? I have heard their qualities diminish with age and as they get coated with life (pollution etc.). Either way I will be choosing a lighter color to cut down on attic heat.

Second, The existing roof roof does not have a metal drip edge and the gutters are tight up to the shingles. Can I just install an ice and water shield and metal drip edge flashing? I assume I should reposition the gutters as well. Was just hoping if the ice and water shield applied with the bottom edge applied onto the facia and then the drip flashing out over the edge of the gutters then it wouldnt matter if the gutters were too high. I am concerned about having to lower the gutters and all the holes in the facia. But writing this makes me realize to just lower them and fill the holes. So, last question, how far up the roof with the ice and water shield? Any reason to cover the entire roof?

Thanks for your advice.
 
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Old 08-15-20, 06:20 AM
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1 course of ice and water shield should be sufficient in North Carolina. Possibly 2, depending on the width of your eves. It may not be specifically mentioned in your local code and really hardly applies in areas that are not prone to hard freezes. One code states:

R905.2.7.1 Ice protection. In areas where the average daily temperature in January is 25F (-4C) or less or when Table R301.2(1) criteria so designates, an ice barrier that consists of a least two layers of underlayment cemented together or of a self-adhering polymer modified bitumen sheet, shall be used in lieu of normal underlayment and extend from the eave’s edge to a point at least 24 inches (610 mm) inside the exterior wall line of the building.

I would not cover the entire roof, no.
 
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Old 08-15-20, 06:28 AM
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Existing roof with gutters too high causes water to wick up under shingles especially with wind driven rain. I have one small area where the sheathing will need to be replaced. So I want this protection at least along the eaves. Even if the gutters are lowered we still get strong wind driven rain. Just wondering if the cost to cover the entire roof would be justified.
 
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