Method for cutting fascia to replace rot?


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Old 12-19-20, 05:34 AM
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Method for cutting fascia to replace rot?

Rotten fascia is a common problem and it isn't always necessary to replace all of the fascia on the entire section/side of a house. Sometimes it only requires 3 or 4 feet near a corner to be replaced. What is the best method and/or tool to make a 45 degree vertical cut in the existing fascia (while it's still attached) to be able to better join the new fascia to it so the joint looks good?
Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 05:40 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

When I have to replace fascia like that I just butt them together because it's a lot easier than trying to get the 45 right on the piece that stays.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 05:47 AM
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Thanks Marksr.
It's definitely easier to use a butt joint, I've tried lots of different ways to cut a 45 but it is very difficult to make the cut and the joint look as good as I'd like. Just curious if anyone has cracked the code on the best way.
Multi tool works ok, but the blade can 'wander' and it's hard to make a straight cut with it. I recently bought a joiner for biscuit joints and it can be set for angles. I may give that a try on my next effort.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 06:14 AM
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I'd just replace the whole section, rotted or not.
That way your not trying to cut through nails and there no chance of damage to the shingles.
Having it wrapped with coil stock will also stop having to deal with painting and rot.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 06:41 AM
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wrapped with coil stock will also stop having to deal with painting and rot
If the fascia is not flashed correctly wrapping will only hide the damage.

 
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Old 12-19-20, 09:23 AM
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You make a block from a 2x6 or similar that has a 45 on one end. You mount that onto the fascia on the side you plan to discard. Then you use a multitool to make your cut (like Fein Multimaster) and use the block with a 45 on one side as a guide for your blade.
 
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Old 12-19-20, 10:03 AM
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Thanks for all the responses.
Joecaption - replacing the full length of the side would definitely look best, but with the cost of fascia these days, it can get expensive. If you wrap one section of fascia with coil stock, wouldn't you need to wrap all of on the house?

XSleeper - good idea. I'll give it a try next time.

As far as avoiding nails, I make a cut next to a rafter tail to miss the nails and then screw a sister onto it to be able to have a solid surface to attach to at the new joint.
 
 

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