Install 5or 6 inch Gutters


  #1  
Old 12-21-20, 09:25 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 229
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Install 5or 6 inch Gutters

I need to have a new aluminum gutter and fascia/aluminum/wrap replaced on the upper story of a two story colonial with total 2200 square ft floor space. The gutter length is 28 ft on this part upper story with a 5/12 pitch roof made of asphalt. This spring I will have all the gutters replaced along with the roof. This upper gutter needs the repair now, since it pulled away from the rotted fascia.

One of the gutter contractors will only quote a 6 inch K gutter, since he claims 5 inch K gutters are not used much anymore and the 6 inch will flow much better. Present gutter is 5 inch with a slot type gutter guard. I am located in NJ as far as rainfall. I read that there are cons to the 6 inch one of which is the are heavier, more expensive, large appearance and required better fastening to the facial/rafter tail. Which size gutter do you recommend ?
 
  #2  
Old 12-21-20, 09:33 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,198
Received 1,948 Upvotes on 1,748 Posts
Some gutter guys only have one machine because they are expensive. So if he is pushing 6" its probably because he doesn't have a 5" gutter machine. Both are typical residential sizes... 6" obviously handles more water, and would be used on bigger houses with more roof area to drain. And yes, 6" will cost more. Weight is really not an issue. Both can be properly secured.

The width of your fascia may have something to do with the decision. If you currently have 5" gutters and they are already flush with the bottom of your fascia, a 6" gutter will hang down even farther. So if your fascia is 1x6, you might want to stick with 5". If your fascia is 1x8 you might use 6".

Typically in the better neighborhoods with larger houses, you will only see 6" gutter. In the end, its up to you.
 
TexnNorthTX voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 12-21-20, 12:11 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 229
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
It is a 1 x 6 fascia. Houses in the area usually have 5 inch.
 
  #4  
Old 12-23-20, 12:24 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 9
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Good advise from xsleeper. One thing that I would add, is that I have always used the gutter style that has the hanger hook extruded to the back of the gutter. This feature has a few advantages. It prevents water from running behind the gutter when used with the apron flashing.. Similar to the detail used in flat seam copper roofing, the back of the gutter has a continuous 180 degree bend. This is hung on a continuous apron flashing, a piece of aluminum about 2' wide with a receiving hook that looks like an upside down question mark. The apron is nailed off and sometimes it's able to stick under the drip edge, which makes it 100% watertight. Otherwise sealant can be used. The apron makes the installation stronger, and can make the install easier by tacking the apron in place with the proper pitch, then snapping the gutter into the lock, Some older gutter rollers don't have the extra wheels to extrude this 180 hook, but some do, and all supply houses sell it this way. Without using this method, the back of the gutter will have fishmouths between the fasteners, which are a ***** to make watertight.
 
  #5  
Old 12-24-20, 07:03 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 229
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info. I think I picture what you are describing, Is there a link to a diagram or pic of the gutter, hanger, drip edge, apron?

Some of the quotes, just state the use of a hidden hanger . The type I got from HD have a u shaped end that slide around the top back edge of the gutter. The screw is driven through the gutter in the fascia. The other end is hooks to the front top lip of the gutter. I can see why they could leak, with the hole in the back of the gutter. Is the fishmouth the notch cut in drip edge to clear the hanger ?

I plan to have the roof done this spring ( tear off) and replace the remaining gutter then, unless you think it is better to do it now before the new roof. I want to include all the features you talked about especially the drip edge and built in hanger.
 
  #6  
Old 12-25-20, 04:13 PM
G
Member
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 9
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I don't know where you could get a drawing, but just try google. A fishmouth occurs when a flat piece of metal is nailed off. The metal between the fasteners doesn't lay flat to the fascia and If bulges a bit, like a fish's mouth. The methods for fastening that you mentioned don't sound right. If I could make a recommendation, I would do the gutters and new roof at one time. This way, if you use the apron, it can easily be installed behind the drip edge, gives you a solid, watertight job. And also, you have time to do your due diligence and to make sure you get the roof and gutters done correctly. When hiring a roofer, you really do get what you pay for.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: