Replacing sheaths just above eaves?


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Old 02-23-21, 11:05 AM
J
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Replacing sheaths just above eaves?

I'm trying to figure out the best process to replace these outer (decking?) planks just above the eaves. The home was built in the 80's in Los Angeles.

Background:
A few years, before we moved in, they did some roofing changes. They added horizontal strips of wood on top of the .. gravel-impregnated bitumen .. (or whatever it's called). They then added cement roof tiles on top.
What they DIDN'T do was replace the water and slightly termite-damaged vertical-running planks (decking?) right at the edge. The tile nails started not to hold and began falling off. You can see, in the attached images, where the inspector (and I) examined the termite damage. It seems it's just the outer planks though. What's the most simple and practical solution for this?

I'm wondering about steps, warnings, and any other advice, like this (I'm just making this up):
1. First, remove tiles back at least 2 planks, to give room for the last good board to lift, without cracking tiles, while prying out the bad.
2. Pry up those horizontal runners they added (battens) enough to pull up the bitumen stuff.
3. Pull up the bitumen stuff carefully so as not to damage it. Warning: Don't fold it or bend it significantly! It can split. If you do get some cracks, patch it with (dunno).
4. Free the tastiest (eaten) planks. If you can pull the nails out from on too, good, otherwise you can pry them from underneath. Try not to damage the horizontal support wood (whatever's), but they don't really pretty from water ingress so some knicks are okay -- you can smooth that out and make sure to paint them with good coverage or.. more termites.
5. In the prior steps, you'll need to have made enough room to get nails into the replacement sheaths. Try to get a match for the width of course. They don't carry that size anymore but if you can cut your own and have a router (I do)... Good luck. If you're not that good with the router, and the sheaths fit too loose, fill the gap with (?)...
6. You can pre-paint the sheaths, but they tend to stick to each other if you do, and the neighboring damaged wood from your carelessness still needs more paint anyway. Might want to do a test fit first.
7. ....
8. ...





 
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Old 02-23-21, 11:15 AM
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That's not the sort of thing that can be done without removing the tile roofing, because it all needs to be done from above.
 
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Old 02-24-21, 05:14 PM
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That's what I thought. Thanks. (I included that in my example steps as the first item).
 
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Old 02-24-21, 05:21 PM
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When you have exposed soffit running perpendicular to the rafters, that soffit needs to run back and pick up several rafters and be staggered so that the butt joints do not all fall on just one rafter. Those cantilevered planks help hold the fascia. So removing one ot two shingles to expose only the 2 vertical planks isn't a very good plan. If the joint of all those pieces ends on the rafter right above the wall, its not going to help hold the fascia up at all. And your tile is heavy so it will eventually sag.
 
 

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