Leaf Guards


  #1  
Old 01-20-22, 06:33 AM
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Leaf Guards

Hello,

I am having new gutters, downspouts, and fascia put on my house. I decided to go with 6 gutters and 4 downspouts. After talking with my roofer, I have some decisions to make. Here is some additional background. The gutters are about 25 feet off the ground, and Im not comfortable going up there on a ladder. The roof is slate with copper valleys. Here are my questions and thank you in advance.

1) I really like the half round gutters, especially since they were likely the original type on my 1940s house. Are there any disadvantages using these instead of the boring k-style?

2) I am trying to decide on a material for the gutters/downspouts. My roofer tells me copper is super-expensive right now. Im concerned of the interaction of steel with the copper valleys. I feel like aluminum will dent easily. What are your thoughts?

3) I currently have leaf guards on my 4 gutters. They are the metal kind that screw on top of the gutter. If I get 6 gutters, would you recommend those? I see the advantages of using them with 4 gutters, but Im not sure if theyre necessary with the 6. I live in an area with large, mature, deciduous trees.

Thank you again.
 
  #2  
Old 01-20-22, 06:42 AM
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1). Half rounds can only handle about 25% of the volume of water, so they are more likely to overflow.

2). Steel is obviously more dent resistant but do you get a lot of hail? Even if you do, that's what insurance is for. Denting is kind of a non issue. You shouldn't really lean ladders on gutters anyway, they make standoffs for that. You gutters shouldn't make direct contact with the valleys. And you likely have Steel drip edge already in contact with the copper. And your copper valleys will dent just like aluminum will.

3). Yep. I would think I you probably have 5" gutters, that's the most common residential size.
 
  #3  
Old 01-25-22, 06:18 PM
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I agree with XSleeper. I did what you did 40 years ago on my two story house. I used Aluminum K style gutters, facias etc. and they have held up thru 3 roof replacements. I used Lowes plastic gutter guards, which I covered in an aluminum wire mesh to keep squirrels out. I would use something like a Gutter Helmet, or Leaf Filter if I were doing it today as at age 75 I do not do two story ladders any more.
 
  #4  
Old 01-25-22, 09:07 PM
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If standard downspouts bore you, do a chain instead:
https://www.google.com/search?q=chai...bih=1009&dpr=1
 
  #5  
Old 01-29-22, 07:54 PM
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Wood gutters were endless problems in DH split level 1950’s home. Had to treated with oil, rotted, filled with leaves, tree limbs smash them, snow blocked flow, etc.

In seeking replacement, priority was reliable service, easy to maintain and replace. Wood gutters rot, aluminum easy crumble when hit by even small limbs, etc. Copper had not benefits over plastic. While home is in up scale area, cosmetics / appearance was not significant issue.

Found ultimate solution white plastic gutters and screen, 10 foot $6.95, 3 foot screen $1.96, $2.78 hanger.

With snap in hanger on fascia board, are easy to install, remove and replace if damaged.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerimax...0120/100061750

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerimax...5270/100009044

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerimax...313258081-_-N&

Potential of ice, snow damage to gutter system is minimized with electric heating cables on lower roof, in gutters and down spouts.

https://www.google.com/searchclient=...UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
 

Last edited by doughess; 01-29-22 at 08:21 PM.
  #6  
Old 01-29-22, 08:03 PM
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Those are going to leak - DIY gutters just can't stand up to seamless gutters made and installed by a pro.
 
  #7  
Old 01-30-22, 09:12 AM
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DH, a DIYer non professional has no problems with leaks on plastic gutters he installed 12 years ago.

If seam at joints leaked many kinds of sealer will stop it.

Home is at top of hill, with many giant oak trees. Falling leaves and tree limbs are major gutter problems.

With plastic gutters and screens, falling limb either bounce off or crush it. Keep 10 foot $6.82 spare just in case.

Damaged aluminum would require calling “pro” to replace entire 20 to 40 foot section

Plastic gutter spout Tees allow for thermal expansion and contraction, ending that issue which is problem on aluminum gutters

Can lean ladder against plastic without damage, unlike aluminum.
 
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Old 01-30-22, 09:21 AM
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I agree with stickshift, and I know from experience that plastic gutter covers cannot stand up to a determined cold squirrel looking for a winter home. I had to make aluminum strips to hold the aluminum wire mesh to several 4' lengths of Lowes solid plastic gutter covers. I put the strips on both sides of the solid plastic cover to hold the strips, the wire, and pop rivets. THAT assembly stopped Rocky and his girlfriend the last 3 winters. (as well as any leaves or other debris that happened by) All of this was mounted on professional seamless aluminum gutters I put in 40 years ago. No leaks ever.
 
  #9  
Old 02-03-22, 01:49 PM
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All wrong. haha. The best DIY leaf guard is the metal mesh guard from your local homedepot. I am providing a link. You probably don't know how to install it properly. I get 1 or 2 leaves on the gutter. And i have a big silver maple in my backyard. Ask me how? lol.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Lock-on-...60X2/205207064
 
  #10  
Old 02-03-22, 02:57 PM
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I'm not sure how long Home Depot has offered those filters, but they do look promising. The squirrels I have here chewed thru some solid aluminum covers I had on the ends for support, and then started on some aluminum I had on the facias between the aluminum gutter and the wooden facia. (I got to them from the top before they got through the facia board.) May be all wrong, but mine have worked for me.
 
  #11  
Old 02-03-22, 03:04 PM
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Good news, metal mess screens big holes keep out leaves. Bad news big holes allow smaller debris in which may build up and clog gutter then bad things happen..

Gutter guards with big and smaller holes keep out both big and small stuff. See DH post #7

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Amerimax...6770/100520851

DH used similar solution with cast iron grate on driveway drain. It stopped leaves but allow smaller debris to fill sump. Covering grate with wire mesh lath screen, held in place with plastic cable ties to solve problem. Periodically have to clean screen but not sump.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/27-in-x-...LATH/202093395
 
  #12  
Old 02-03-22, 03:28 PM
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Wrong wrong dead wrong. Small debris get wash down the gutter. No clog whatsoever. Plastic guards will bent. One year or two, they will need replacement.

Metal mesh guard, the way i stall it, will not budge. Will withstand any storm coming its way. The best and cost effective. All you have to do is ask me how? haha.
 
  #13  
Old 02-03-22, 03:35 PM
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There's a trick to installing it. You will see the light!
 
  #14  
Old 02-03-22, 07:02 PM
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Ok, so these are the tools you need. My gutters have 7 inch nails holding them up. If you have brackets holding them up, it'd also work. You need to clip the ends together and secure them with the steel wires. The goal is that it is one piece and not many pieces. Once you do that, and because they have holes, you can tie the metal leaf guard to the 7 inch nail or the bracket. That way, the leaf guards will never budge. This is the perfect solution.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/OOK-100-...0136/202341129

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Wiss-12-...F12S/315473364
 
  #15  
Old 02-04-22, 04:40 AM
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If you live in an area with pine trees then guards with larger holes will clog up with pine needles.
Had a stainless steel miromesh type (similar to Easy Guard they sell at Costco) at the lake and never had a problem.
I did go through a fair number of Dremel cutting wheels as the stainless is very tough.
They now make it self stick but I would not recommend that.
Screws are better then if you ever need to taking it off and reusing it is not a problem.
Also it may be a pain to install if the shingles are bent/sagged down as I installed it by sliding one edge under them then self tap screws on the outer edge.
 
  #16  
Old 02-04-22, 08:08 AM
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I just refurbished my 40 year old shed with a new roof, siding and guttters. I am going to try out the Home depot perforated covers you are selling. the roof edge is low enough that my Grandmother (don't tell her I called her that!) won't be squawking from the patio at me when i am installing them.....
 
 

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