Recommendation for Older Fascias


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Old 08-01-22, 09:31 PM
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Recommendation for Older Fascias

My HOA said I have to repaint my fascias, which are the originals which came with the house built in 2005. They are a little worn so wondering what you could recommend as far as paint or another chemical solution that would protect them. See attached photo.

The HOA gave me a list of paint to use from Sherwin Williams but was wondering if there's something more relevant that would refinish and protect them from the elements. I live in southern Nevada.
 
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Old 08-01-22, 09:31 PM
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Old 08-02-22, 04:08 AM
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Nothing more than a quality exterior paint.
 
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Old 08-02-22, 04:14 AM
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Was the HOA list for coatings advised or colors allowed?
IMO SWP's SuperPaint is their best exterior paint for the price. Some paints hold up better than others in certain locales/environments so it's a good idea to discuss that with the paint rep at the store.
 
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Old 08-02-22, 10:33 AM
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Yes, the HOA provided me with full schematics that lists all the recommended colors and the Sherwin Williams number. Here's one that I think closely matches what I have:

https://www.sherwin-williams.com/hom...151-quiver-tan

Not sure how to rate the quality of that paint. Will it hold up? We do get extreme temperatures and such.

Also, should I caulk anything as well?
 
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Old 08-02-22, 01:10 PM
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Talk to your local SWP rep. As long as the paint doesn't dry too fast when it's applied the heat shouldn't hurt it much. They sell a wide range of paint quality, you don't want the cheapest! use mid grade or better.
 
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Old 08-24-22, 05:22 PM
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So I ended up getting Behr Premium Plus Paint & Primer from Home Depot using the Sherwin color code. I think this is it:

https://www.behr.com/consumer/produc...s-satin-enamel

I applied multiple layers to the wood and it appears it's not fully covering the nooks and crannies that have formed. Will that be a problem? I'll see if I can take a photo but it appears to be covering the entire surface well. I sanded the loose pieces of the wood with a sanding block prior.

Another question I had is how can I manage drops of paint that landed on my concrete driveway? I tried spraying and scrubbing with water but it only worked to a limited extent.
 
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Old 08-25-22, 04:15 AM
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multiple layers to the wood and it appears it's not fully covering the nooks and crannies that have formed
Not sure if I understand, are you saying there are little pin holes in the paint? if so, a coat of thinner paint should be the fix. If you mean certain areas didn't cover well - it's best to give them another coat.

Denatured alcohol might soften the dried paint enough for you to scrub it off. Paint remover would be another option. The best method is to cover anything paint might get on prior to painting. A little late now but something to remember in the future.
 
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Old 08-28-22, 10:25 PM
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See attached for before and after photos. Does it look OK or should I fill it with something?

 
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Old 08-29-22, 01:19 AM
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So I ended up getting Behr Premium Plus Paint & Primer from Home Depot
Ugh, terrible product, do some searching on this side and read the horrible experiences.

In your original picture I assumed everything was stucco, if your painting wood a solid stain would be best. I just pained all my fascia's on my new garage, rough cut cedar, and used Benjamin Moore Arborcoat Exterior stain, It filled all the gaps in this extremely rough wood easily, your photo doesn't look like it did anything!
 
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Old 08-29-22, 04:04 AM
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Basically anything you use to fill those cracks will fail sooner or later. IMO you have 3 choices; a liberal coat of paint and call it good enough, replace the wood or wrap it with aluminum.
 
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Old 08-29-22, 08:13 AM
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The HOA recommended I use Sherwin Williams but never mentioned Arborcoat. How long do you think the Home Depot brand will last? For now, I'd rather satisfy the HOA requirements and then look into something more long-term. I have 25 days or so to finish the paint job.
 
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Old 08-29-22, 08:53 AM
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How long do you think the Home Depot brand will last?
Seems to me it hasn't even met the current requirements.

Exterior solid stains are exactly what you need, what you bought was just a cheap exterior paint, Exterior stains are intended for heavy duty exterior use. The fascia's and shutters I have stained had a much greater texture than what your showing and it easily filled them.

I've used solid stains on all my houses for the past 40 years (hate aluminum covered trim) and as long as your using a quality product have never had a failure and the finish has lasted literally decades.

I'd rather satisfy the HOA requirements and then look into something more long-term.
Appling the stain to very weathered wood would be a better option for the long term rather than putting it over an inferior paint!
 
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Old 08-29-22, 08:57 AM
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Fair enough. I'll go inquire about this. But does stain add color?
 
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Old 08-29-22, 09:13 AM
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It is color, it's basically a paint but specialized for exterior applications.

If you get it, you will be amazed at how heavy that gallon of stain is compared to any gallon of paint, a testament to the amount of solids within!
 
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Old 08-29-22, 10:35 AM
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You can get a solid stain in virtually any color you can get with paint. While it's more technical, solid stain is kind of like a thinner version of paint.
 
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Old 08-29-22, 02:08 PM
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OK. It's on!
 
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Old 08-29-22, 03:15 PM
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solid stain is kind of like a thinner version of paint.
The solid stains I use, the BM and an older Coronado stain that recently was discontinued were much thicker than paint, more like pancake batter. That thicker consistency is what allows it to be brushed/pushed into all the grain and fill it up solid.
 
 

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