Flat Roof Conversion


  #1  
Old 01-31-02, 12:39 PM
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Talking Flat Roof Conversion

We need to replace our nearly flat built-up roof (2/12) and are looking at converting to a shingled one with more slope (about 4/12) for aesthetic and practical reasons. I don't know much about how it's done or what's involved. Is the old roof left in place? Can trusses be used? Is the existing overhang cut off? Relative costs? I'm thinking about doing the job myself. Any tips, advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-02-02, 07:31 AM
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You have not really given us enough information to answer your questions. This is a big job, and not really a DIY'er one. Please do not take this next statement wrong as but the by the questions you have asked I would guess that you may not have enough experience to tackle this job. Good Luck
 
  #3  
Old 02-04-02, 11:47 AM
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RE: Flat Roof Conversion

No offense taken. I'm a relatively competent DIY'er and have tackled all sorts of jobs in the past, including helping frame a new home and building a stickbuilt roof. I do know that some jobs are best left to the experts, however, and appreciate the feedback.

The home in question is a single story frame structure built in the mid-50's. During a remodel job in the 70's, the existing roof was completely tore down and a new hot tar 'n gravel built-up roof added. The roof looks to be pretty conventional... plywood sheathing over 2x4 stick framing. It's a very simple roof design, with no intersecting roof lines or other complications involved. After spot patching the various leaks over the last couple of years, It's obvious that it's new roof time. I've checked with the local roofing contractors and find that renewing the existing roof is a relatively expensive proposition. Further, the previous homeowner owner built the roof with the low pitch and long eaves that overhang the building by over 4', giving the house an odd look that's pretty much out of character in the neighborhood. Worse, the approach to the house is from below, and from that angle the roof looks completely flat. For all these reasons, a roof conversion appears to be the way to go.

I would do the job myself with some experienced helpers if it appeared to be feasible. Otherwise, I'd like to at least know a little more on the subject to be able to speak to prospective contractors more knowledgeably. I've had a couple of contractors come over to look at the job, but they have not been very forthcoming about the details of how they would tackle the project. At this point, I'm trying to gather as much information on the subject as I can in order to best decide which way to proceed, so any help would sincerely be appreciated.

Thanks!

Wes
 
 

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