Asphalt Shakes


  #1  
Old 03-01-02, 06:02 PM
Pupmc
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Question Asphalt Shakes

We need a new roof and would like to go with the new asphalt shake-look shingles. What manufacturer makes the best one? We are in the country on a lake and wind is an issue. We are looking at Elk Prestique and Certainteed brands. Not sure what the Certainteed shake-looks are called. Also have heard of one called Timberline. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Those warranties are bewildering!
 
  #2  
Old 03-02-02, 10:19 PM
Join Date: Dec 1999
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Both timberlane and Certainteed are great. We use them alot.
I believe Certaineed has a new wind resistant shingle. Heavier and a little more expensive but worth it. You use a wind nail with them. a 2 1/2" roofing nail. We have used them on a 7000 sq ft roof. Look great and has withstood three storms of 80 mph winds. remember to face nail the edges. Good Luck
 
  #3  
Old 03-03-02, 09:35 AM
roofrat
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CertainTeed makes a shingle called Hatteras. This shingle has a 40 year warranty when applicated as per manufacturers specifications. CertainTeed has it on thier web site. Also Hatteras has a 110 mph wind resistance warranty. Timberline is a GAF product and also has a 40 year warranty available but has a 80 mph wind warranty as with most asphalt or fiberglass shingles.
Although we do not agree with Jack about the (wind nailing) Wind nailing does not mean the length of the roofing nail as he stated 2 1/2 inch. It means the amount of nails per shingle. Some shingles of this type need 5 or 6 nails per shingle to meet Manufactures specifications.
As the 1997 Uniform building code states: Fasteners shall be long enough to penetrate into the sheathing 3/4 inch or through the thickness of the sheathing whichever is LESS. It is the nail head diameter (Minimum 3/8-inch) and the amount of nails per shingle that give you the best performance not the length! Surface nailing is also not recommended at the edges.
 
  #4  
Old 03-03-02, 03:02 PM
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I hate to make a correction, but I did not say wind nailing. I said use wind nails. A whole world of difference. One is a verb the other is a noun. I looked up the job and it was the Hatteras that we used. Great shingle. Have a happy day guys. We are shingling today, and it is 10 below zero.
 
  #5  
Old 03-04-02, 06:20 PM
roofrat
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Hi Jack
I have been in the roofing industry for over 30 years and I have never heard of or seen a ---Wind--- Nail. My point was the length of the nails are too long. What do you acheive when penetrating the sheathing by 1 and 3/4 inch? Do you bend them over on the inside with a hammer? And by the way that is a verb. It has no more holding power than the length of nails you are supposed to use as per the Building code. You get your holding power by penetrating the sheathing, Head diameter and amount of nails per shingle not by using over size nails.
 
 

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