Tacking carpet


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Old 02-08-00, 04:32 PM
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I have around a 10' edge of carpet where it transitions to hard wood. I do not like the look of the metel strips that hold the edge of the carpet down. I have seen carpets where the edge has been turned under some how. Does anyone know how to do this ???
 
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Old 02-09-00, 06:16 AM
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The major reasons for the ugly metal strip is to A: protect the edge of the carpet and B: make a smooth transition from hardwood to carpet.

If the 10' edge was bound and you eliminated the matal strip, this would create a "trip" hazard. Another option would be to get a wooden transition piece that matches the hardwood floor. These are made with a mitered groove on the bottom to accomodate the extra thickness of the carpeting. These should be available either from your local carpet supplier or building supply company.

Ted
 
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Old 11-26-04, 07:36 PM
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I have around a 10' edge of carpet where it transitions to hard wood. I do not like the look of the metel strips that hold the edge of the carpet down. I have seen carpets where the edge has been turned under some how. Does anyone know how to do this ???


It is sometimes refferred to as the "Turn and tack" method.
It is commonly done and also if done incorrectly can be an eye sore. I cannot stress enough to leave all carpet work to the pros. That being said, you use an electric tacker (crown staple gun). You roll the carpet and seperate the yarns so you are shooting right into the backing DO NOT grab a yarn, you will see this when you put it back. With the correct stappling and correct spacing, it can look beautiful. The draw backs are, yes, it gets dirty from a broom or mop hitting the edge over time. And wear is an issue at THAT spot. The other concearn is, if you have a padding of say...(to help you visualize better) a quarter inch, and your carpet is an inch thick, you can imagine a bump being produced when you roll it under (and worse, possibly an air pocket). Since you will be putting a thicker material under the carpet at that point. This can be taken care of in most cases by a pro who knows the correct amount to cut back and how to roll properly. Obviously a dense carpet that is a half inch thick being rolled back and butted to a half inch pad under would produce a nice look.

When new installation is done, the "tacking" is done first and they stretch away FROM IT. You never want to stretch INTO your tailoring. In your case, the carpet has already been installed and you would have to more than likely apply some pressure into you tailoring. Again...leave it to a pro.

Ed
 
 

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