Carpet trim


  #1  
Old 10-23-05, 04:55 PM
Teresa
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Question Carpet trim

Please HELP! I've stumped the Menard's manager so I seek a simple answer here...
I'm trying to install carpet trim, between my new carpet and vinyl tiles, into a concrete basement floor. The package says to use MD wood Pegs if securing into concrete floors---what is this? Is it some kind of anchor for the nails that come with the trim or what?
Also, any tips on how not to get carpet fibers to wrap around the drill bit?
Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 10-23-05, 06:48 PM
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Teh pegs are basically plugs, you drill a hole and put the pegs into, gives something for the screws or nails to go into.
 
  #3  
Old 10-23-05, 09:08 PM
Teresa
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carpet trim

Like a plastic anchor?
 
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Old 10-23-05, 10:29 PM
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Maybe don't get hung up on "wood pegs". Just tell the Home Depot staff (or whomever) what you want to do and they should direct you to the right stuff that will work with the tools you have.

In regards to drilling through carpet my advice is BE CAREFUL. I used to install phones and had a few nasty runs in my day while drilling through carpet. I'm no pro but I don't think you should need to drill through carpet to put in a transition strip. I drill holes at the edge of the carpet or push the carpet back and then drill.

If you do need to drill through, take a sharp utility knife and make an X opening for the drill bit. Use a variable speed drill and start out real slow watching the bit to be sure you are not wrapping any fiber.
 
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Old 10-24-05, 07:07 AM
Teresa
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carpet trim

Thanks for replying...I did explain my problem & they couldn't assist me! I'll try a carpet store.
 
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Old 10-24-05, 11:34 PM
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Hi Teresa,
I must be missing something because you should just need to drill a couple holes in the concrete and put in plugs or whatever, then screw down the transition.
Hang around the forum here and one of the moderators will respond. They will likely understand the problem and provide a solution.
Meanwhile, check this link out
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=237627
 
  #7  
Old 10-25-05, 07:06 AM
Teresa
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carpet trim

Thanks again. Here's a dumb girl question: Is a mason bit the same as a concrete bit? I appreciate the help.
I redid our basement as a surprise to my deployed husband who is coming home on a short pass thursday!!
 
  #8  
Old 10-27-05, 03:41 PM
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Go to Home Depot and they have a selection of wood dowl rods. Get a dowl rod and a concrete/masonry bit to match. A hammer drill makes this go much quicker. Drill hole to the depth needed. Cut off some dowl rod and hammer it into the hole. Take a grinder and shave off any wood sticking above the surface. Mount by screwing into the inserted dowl rod. You can do the same with a bunch of tooth picks, or use a plastic wall anchor.
 
  #9  
Old 10-28-05, 08:16 AM
Teresa
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carpet trim

Heyyyy, I was hoping you'd reply! Thank You.
One additional question---do I use the nails that came with the molding strip or do i need to get certain screws?
 
  #10  
Old 10-28-05, 10:03 AM
vinstrom
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teresa

good wood screws will work fine....toothpick, dowel rods both will work...all your doing is filling the hole with something that will hold the screws....
 
  #11  
Old 10-28-05, 10:04 AM
vinstrom
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teresa

good wood screws will work fine....toothpick, dowel rods both will work...all your doing is filling the hole with something that will hold the screws....bot don;t get screws that are longer than what you need....
 
  #12  
Old 10-29-05, 09:27 AM
Teresa
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carpet trim

My main concern is if the wood screws come as small as the nails that come with the moulding? You know, to fit the circumference of the predrilled holes in the moulding strip.
 
  #13  
Old 10-29-05, 10:03 AM
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Don't worry. They make every size of screw you need. Take the carpet trim to a hardware store and then you are gauranteed to get the right size. The screws should fit through the holes without catching but even if they do catch, you can just keep screwing through and it will pull the trim down.
 
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Old 10-30-05, 03:17 AM
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I see, now. You got a flat metal and not a crimp metal. The flat metal comes with fluted nails with heads to match the metal.

Use a dowl rod, and be sure it is a snug fit to get it into the hole you drill. a tiny squirt of liquid nails in the hole. Hammer the peg in. let it sit if it isn't a tight peg to hole match. Then use the fluted nails that came with the metal.

With those top mounted flat metals, it looks best to center your fastener holes so it looks even.
 
  #15  
Old 10-30-05, 12:29 PM
Teresa
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carpet trim

I'm off to the store...I'll let ya'll know how I did!! Thanks so much.
:mask: Happy Halloween
 
  #16  
Old 10-31-05, 12:24 PM
Teresa
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carpet trim

To all who care...
your advice was perfect and the hammer drill is an [B][AWESOME tool!!!
One final question, promise, is this: What is the trick to completely pound the nails flush with the metal strip without leaving pound marks!!! (Some of the nailheads are sharp & not even!)
Anyway, thanks to you guys, I'm done & the surprise was a hit!
 
  #17  
Old 11-01-05, 06:11 PM
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If this is the nails I'm thinking of, they are "pill" heads They should tap down nicely without "pound marks"

From my experience, they don't go all the way flush with the metal. That is why we call them "pill heads".
 
  #18  
Old 11-02-05, 07:24 AM
Teresa
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carpet trim

I used a heavy duty bolt to help pound down the nailheads! That worked much better than a nail set!
My next challenge was then to match up the corners, cutting the metal at angles-- !! I have good DIY skills, but that was a long, tedious process for me & my rotozip!! I give you flooring people much more appreciation now that I've experienced this task.
Have a great day
 
 

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