Remove Carpet to fix sub floor and reinstall same

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  #1  
Old 06-30-07, 10:22 PM
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Remove Carpet to fix sub floor and reinstall same

We had a problem with the a/c and the pump failed and water sat on the carpet and floor. I would like to roll the carpet up and check the sub floor then reinstall the original carpet. The issue is in the hallway which connects to another room. It look as thou the easier way to full the carpet up in the hall would be to cut the carpet where the hall and room join. My question is what is the best way to cut the carpet and then to rejoin it once the work is done.
 
  #2  
Old 07-01-07, 11:57 AM
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Don't cut the carpet. Carpet releases from the tack strips pretty easily by pulling up on it in a corner. It can then be reinstalled right back down. If you're unfamiliar, I'd recommend having a pro reinstall for you.
 
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Old 07-01-07, 04:35 PM
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What mitch has suggested, in so far as removal is concerned is, on the surface, correct. If the carpet isn't seamed to any other rooms off the hall and you can pull it up without cutting it, that will be easiest for you. You wouldn't have to seam it back together later. However, if it is seamed to any other rooms, you'll have to break it some where so it may as well be in the effected area. Most of the time there will be a seam in the doorway already so you shouldn't have to actually cut the carpet, just break open the existing seam. The seam will normally be situated in the part of the doorway the door is hinged on, directly in the center of the door when it's closed. Take a pair of pliers and gently tug on the carpet where it is stuffed around the doorway in order to disengage it from the pins of the tack strip. When you have it up enough to allow, feel the under side of the carpet to try to determine if there is seam tape there, indicating the presence of a seam. If there is one, pull or twist one side of the seam in order to get the point the two sides meet to open up enough to make the joint visible. Use a utility knife to get between the two edges and cut the tape without cutting the carpet. In many instances I've seen seams actually pull apart without cutting the tape in the case of a flood. If it will do that easily, go ahead and pull it apart and then peel the tape off the other side. If it doesn't come apart easily, don't try to force it, you'll damage the carpet backing. Cut it apart with the knife and then melt the tape off both sides with a seaming iron. If, in your investigation stage, you discover there is no seam in this doorway, you'll need to create one. Use a ball point pen or anything like it with a tip that is sharp yet not sharp enough to cut the backing and run it through the yarn of the carpet from side to side of the doorway. Get the point under the yarn and in contact with the backing at the starting point and keep it in contact with the backing all the way across. This will open up a place to cut the backing without cutting the yarn. It isn't necessary to use a straight edge, but keep the cut as straight as you can so the two sides will seam back together without getting off the tape in places. Go slowly and be careful you don't cut too much yarn in the process. The resulting seam later will be ugly if you cut too much yarn. All of this is based on cut pile carpet. If you're dealing with loop pile, the instructions are a bit different. If you need further assistance, let us know.
 
  #4  
Old 07-01-07, 05:30 PM
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I made the assumption we're dealing with a small area. If I'm wrong in that assumption, Smokey's advice is good.
 
 

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