Carpet seaming

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  #1  
Old 10-27-07, 07:39 AM
G
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Carpet seaming

I am a dyi'er, actually a do it all by myself'er. Anyway, my question is, when seaming the carpet can I use the factory cuts and butt them together or is it better to overlap and slice them both together. I have a plush(frizzie) carpet and it seems that the factory seam is a straight cut however, when I put them both next to each other I can still make out the seam. If you butt up both pieces prior to seaming, should the seam look invisible or does the seam dissapear after the heating process?

Thank you in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 10-28-07, 05:56 AM
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nothing?

Doesn't anyone have an answer?
 
  #3  
Old 10-28-07, 06:20 AM
S
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Give it a little time. I'm sure you'll get an answer because there are a lot of people here with knowledge in this area. Sometimes it takes a couple of days for them to be online and see your question and Saturday actually seems to be a day when a lot of us aren't able to be here. Be patient and you'll get all the help you need.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 10:34 AM
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forensics

After doing some deep probing on the factory carpet edge I noticed that some of the fibers (which are plush) have been chopped which 'I guess' were accentuating the seam. I then proceeded to cut my own straight line and but them together which looks a lot better. Another question that I have is, can I use masking tape to tape the fibers back from the cut to make it easier for me to make sure that I don't overlap or gap the seam? I know pro's don't do this but for a diy'er I think this might be a good option. Anyone have any input on this?

Thanks in advance.
 
  #5  
Old 10-29-07, 11:38 PM
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Sorry GR 987, I've been working long hours and not checking in much. You have to trim the factory edges to get a good seam. With that sort of carpet, if you don't have a row knife or a good straight edge, you can get a pretty straight line by running an old ball point pen along the edge, about an inch in from the edge. Hold the pen lightly so you don't force it. The pen will follow a row and open up the yarn. You can cut along the resulting line with a good scissors and get a good seam edge. Be careful to not cut any of the yarn or the seam will show too much. Technically, there is no such thing as an invisible seam, but, in that sort of material, I regularly make them go away. You can use your masking tape idea if you want. I see no reason it wouldn't work. I don't do that, but I've run enough seams to get to China from here.
 
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Old 11-02-07, 07:47 AM
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Finished

Ok, the carpet is in and I didn't use the masking tape idea. I really don't think it is necessary. I just combed back the fibers the best I could and ran the iron across. It looks great and I am happy I did it myself. I ran the vacuum over and you really can't notice the seam except for one little area but, I don't mind because a couch is going into that spot. For other DIY'er attempting this on there own, keep in mind that when you come to the end of the seam and you go to lift up the iron, most likely the tape is going to come up with it so, either tack it down or just be aware.

Thanks
 
  #7  
Old 11-03-07, 12:58 AM
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Congratulations, feels good, doesn't it? As for the minor show in it, if anyone visits, sees it, and mentions it, they didn't come to visit, they came to pick your carpet apart and really don't need to be there.
 
 

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