Moisture Barrier Pad

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  #1  
Old 01-01-08, 10:59 AM
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Moisture Barrier Pad

Is it worth the xtra money for the moisture barrier pad? We have multiple cats that do tend to pee and vomit ( lovely, I know). We are opting for tile in most areas but will be putting carpet in the bedrooms.

So what pad is recommended here???

Also....We are thinking of installing basic nylon carpet. As mentioned we have cats that do act out and pee and we have 3 little ones that are just that, kids that spill and get sick.

We are accepting we will have to replace carpet every 5 yrs or so. Just want to know what is best for our situation. We've been told by 2 places to go with the 'everclean' type w/moisture barrier but looking at the warranty it doesn't cover the stains we would encounter so my thoughts are to not spend the extra $$.

Other recommendation we have gotten is stick with builders grade w/ moisture barrier pad and expect to replace every 3 yrs.

Thanks!!
 
  #2  
Old 01-02-08, 08:36 AM
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Marketing, to get more of your cash.... You house is going to stink like cat urine, regardless if the pad doesn't soak it up. The key is preventing, or eliminating the source.
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-08, 01:01 PM
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so keep it low cost...

So would your recommendation be to just stick to the basic 6lb pad, minimum nylon grade carpet with expectation to replace again in 3-5 yrs?
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-08, 12:13 PM
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don't use moisture barrier padding

I have never been convinced that any padding that has a moisture barrier attatched to it work.
you would be safe using a 7/16 6lb, but if It was my choice I would spend a little bit more and go with a 7/16 8lb rebond padding.
 
  #5  
Old 11-27-08, 06:07 AM
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It has been my observation, based on re-carpeting MILES of animal damaged flooring, that the problem is normally at the edges of the floor rather than out in the field of the floor. The urine goes down between the edge of the pad and the tack strip, wicks up under the tack strip and outer edge of the pad, and renders it necessary to remove everything, including the strip, in order to treat the floor before installation of new material. If you're determined to keep the source of the problem, how about re-thinking your choice of flooring and go with hard surfaces through out and use throw rugs where you want carpeted floors? You can make your own by purchasing the carpet you want, cutting it to what ever shape you desire, binding the edges, and gluing pad to the back of it. When replacement becomes necessary, simply roll it up, send it to carpet heaven, and make a new one, after washing the hard surfaced floor under it.
 
 

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