Protecting Walls During Installation


  #1  
Old 01-07-13, 10:22 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Protecting Walls During Installation

Any clever ways to protect our newly painted walls during our carpet installation? We will be painting a week or so before the carpet is installed, so we're concerned that the paint won't be fully cured and will chip off, especially since the walls are non-porous (faux wood paneling). How about some sort of static-cling plastic like the type used over newly carpeted floors in new homes?
 
  #2  
Old 01-07-13, 10:37 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,110
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
I can't imagine much chance of damage from carpet install? Maybe a few corner rubs, but those could be easily touched up on the new paint.
 
  #3  
Old 01-07-13, 11:08 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Ok. I wasn't sure. The installers asked if the walls would be newly painted, so I figured this was the reason why. I'm probably being overly cautious, as usual.
 
  #4  
Old 01-07-13, 12:49 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
I've painted a lot of new homes and the carpet is always installed behind fresh paint. With the exception of a few bad installers - touch up is minimal..... and fresh paint touches up better than old

My only concern would be the painted paneling. What type of primer was used? Paneling and poly/varnished wood can chip if the wrong primer was used
 
  #5  
Old 01-09-13, 04:35 AM
sam floor's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: May 2010
Location: floor installer
Posts: 1,067
Received 25 Votes on 20 Posts
Usually a problem only occurs if the wrong type of paint is used or the surface is poorly prepared. I have seen customers paint over varnished wood work with high gloss paint without sanding first, of course the paint will chip. Some carpets, especially berber types, have very rough backings too.
 
  #6  
Old 01-11-13, 05:43 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
It is your typical faux wood paneling with smooth glossy surface. No primer was used and no surface preparation. I explained to the man at the paint store that I needed a paint that would adhere to a glossy surface and he recommended a Behr product, which is what I bought. He was and older man and seemed very knowledgeable about paint, so I trusted him.
 
  #7  
Old 01-11-13, 07:12 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
I'm not real familiar with Behr coatings but generally prefinished wood paneling needs to be sanded and then coated with a solvent based primer. That insures that the finish paint will bond well. Quite often when the prep is skipped, the paint will chip when it gets bumped or scratched. Hopefully you will get lucky and not have any issues.
 
  #8  
Old 01-11-13, 07:17 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,171
Received 1,166 Votes on 1,124 Posts
You went to HD and he recommended a HD product, no surprise there. I'm guessing it's a 'paint and primer in one' product?
 
  #9  
Old 01-11-13, 08:54 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
No, not paint and primer in one. That is what I figured they would sell me, but he recommended this other product. The walls need to be painted quickly before my daughter's b-day party next weekend, so there will be no sanding or priming, we'll simply be rolling on the paint and hoping for the best. Don't get me wrong, this is not my preference, but the wife is pushing me to just get it done. We're likely going to end up with crappy carpet and chipped paint in the end, which I'll end up fixing.
 
  #10  
Old 01-11-13, 09:12 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,171
Received 1,166 Votes on 1,124 Posts
Yeah, good luck with that - I hate doing a job less well than I think it should be done just because someone else gets a say in the project.

All I can do is recommend you make note of this and save it for future reference so you can hopefully have greater ability to do things right down the road.
 
  #11  
Old 01-11-13, 09:23 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Painting the basement and getting new carpet was a last minute project initiated by my wife, so I have no choice but to half-ass it. This isn't how I like to do things. There are a couple paints out there that specify they are for glossy surfaces. I'm hoping this Behr product is one of them--I'll look at the label when I get home.
 
  #12  
Old 01-11-13, 09:35 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
If it was me, I'd oil prime the paneling even if it meant I had to apply the finish paint after the carpet was installed.
 
  #13  
Old 01-11-13, 09:44 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Oil-based primer followed by latex paint would make me feel better. That's my plan at this point.
 
  #14  
Old 01-11-13, 09:46 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 634
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've used some of the paint and primer in one paints myself. Most of Benjamin Moore's mid to high end paints now make this claim. Prior to that I was always skeptical as well. The only way I trust them in this claim however is painting over small patches like nail holes, dings in walls, etc. Anything bigger than a fist gets primed and scuff sanded before painting. The girls at the paint store say you can roll them right over raw drywall. Not a chance I'd do that either.

That being said, there is no way I'd be painting entire walls of wood paneling without priming it first. Not a chance and if the customer told me to do it I'd refuse and walk away. I'm not risking getting a call back in a year by a new owner saying my paint job was peeling off and my customer gave them my phone number to complain.

I would STRONGLY recommend to your wife that you are creating a disaster by neglecting this one, very important step in a painting process. You're going to be putting on two coats of paint anyways, not a big deal with adding one coat of primer to the mix ahead of time?
 
  #15  
Old 01-11-13, 10:02 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,171
Received 1,166 Votes on 1,124 Posts
Bill:

I'm getting the impression this is even only going to be one coat of paint.
 
  #16  
Old 01-11-13, 10:08 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 634
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oh. This will not end well then.

Put one coat of primer on and tell people at the bday party it's a new colour called Primerian White. I love telling people that one, gets them all excited with a fancy name. Then you can paint the walls later and not feel crushed for time.

Seriously, the kids at a bday party really aren't going to care about what colour the walls are. Personally I wouldn't care if they did care, it's my house and I'm not intentionally screwing it up for anyone.
 
  #17  
Old 01-11-13, 10:31 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,171
Received 1,166 Votes on 1,124 Posts
Bill:

It's the wife who's driving all of this....
 
  #18  
Old 01-11-13, 10:56 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
She's not going to go for that. She wants it to be complete. Plus, we're painting before the new carpet is installed so we don't have to worry about spills, etc. How long does oil-based primer need to dry before painting? I have 10 days until the carpet guys come.
 
  #19  
Old 01-11-13, 11:16 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 634
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's miles of time Sir! You're good to go. Zinsser Cover Stain dries in one hour, but I'd give it more than that. Maybe consider their odourless oil primer to reduce the smell. I honestly believe the odourless is just as bad as non, but they found a way to make it not smell as much.
 
  #20  
Old 01-11-13, 01:58 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
Cool temps and humidity can slow down the primer's drying time. I'd prime it one day and wait until the next day to start with the finish paint...... that also gives your head time to recuperate from the fumes from the oil primer
 
  #21  
Old 01-11-13, 02:59 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
It IS paint and primer in one (Behr Premium Ultra Stain Blocking Paint and Primer in One). So I guess I can skip the oil-based primer? I have enough to do at least two coats, so hopefully that is sufficient. If there is still a chance of chipping and/or peeling, I have no problem applying primer first, then the Behr paint/primer if recommended.
 
  #22  
Old 01-11-13, 03:57 PM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,110
Received 4 Votes on 4 Posts
Before anyone else weighs in.....yes...you really need the oil based primer.

Though I've had no issues with Behr...it was always applied over previously painted surfaces or properly primed surfaces.

I'd really REALLY go with the Pro's on this. Painting any sort of slick or impermeable surface needs prep. If the paint starts peeling off the paneling later...then you have a heck of a job.

You have time to do a good job.
 
  #23  
Old 01-12-13, 05:17 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
Use an oil primer!! If need be, have your primer tinted to match the top coat. That way you can get by with 1 coat primer and 1 coat finish.
 
  #24  
Old 01-12-13, 01:51 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
I'll definitely go with an oil-based primer first. No tinting needed--the top coat will be white. Glad I checked first. Thanks!
 
  #25  
Old 01-19-13, 05:40 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Holy paint fumes!!! I didn't realize it was going to be this bad. My wife cut-in Thursday night and didn't wear a mask. I could smell it upstairs almost immediately. I ended up putting a fan in the window to exhaust the fumes and it has helped, but after I rolled the wall today it didn't make a difference. The whole house smelled for a couple hours. Luckily I bought a respirator so I didn't smell a thing. I'm surprised my eyes weren't burning. It's fine now though and I'll be applying the paint/primer tomorrow. Looks like I can probably get by with one coat. Thanks for recommending the oil-based primer. I now know why it was necessary.
 
  #26  
Old 01-20-13, 09:34 AM
G
Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Hamilton County, Ohio
Posts: 4,295
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Just a general comment. We recently had new carpet installed and a professional paint job.

The painter said to have the carpet installed first because we would probably have to call them back after the installers left.
 
  #27  
Old 01-20-13, 12:36 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
It depends on the painter's schedule and how close/far the job is from his other work. I prefer to paint first and then come back and do the touch up BUT if it's going to be inconvenient to go back - it's not that big of a deal to paint after the carpet is installed!
 
  #28  
Old 01-20-13, 12:55 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 634
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree. All the time I have people losing their minds over whether I'm going to destroy their new carpets, flooring, tile, counter, etc. They're called drop sheets and plastic sheeting folks! I've opened up the back door to my van and showed them $500 worth of drop sheets that are likely enough to sheet their entire house!
 
  #29  
Old 01-20-13, 01:14 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
Back in the early 70's I bid an exterior and then before I started the job I heard all kinds of horror stories about the homeowners and how hard they were to work for. I put the job off as long as I could but finally had to go over there and paint.
When I got ready to paint the windows, the homeowner asked for a rag and some turpentine so he could keep the paint washed off of the interior walls. I promptly told him I was only painting the exterior of the windows. He responded " I know" Well he watched me paint one window and decided I was the 1st real painter that had ever worked on his house.
By the end of the job I realized all the horror stories came from the homeowners just wanting a decent paint job that previously no one was able to deliver.
 
  #30  
Old 01-20-13, 03:16 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 4,234
Received 22 Votes on 17 Posts
Finished painting today. Looks really nice. One coat of Zinsser and one coat of Behr paint/primer in one. Fumes have subsided. Carpet will be installed sometime tomorrow. What a difference.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: