carpet newbie -4 installing

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  #1  
Old 02-19-01, 02:17 PM
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I am looking to tackle a home project of installing carpet. What types are the easiest to do? This is for a new construction. We have not purchased yet. What do you use for "stretching", and where do you purchase or rent these? Also, is $2.75 enough allowance for good carpet and pad? Help??!!
 
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Old 02-21-01, 07:18 AM
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Installing carpet is an art! Not saying you can't do it but the results may be different then someone that has done it most of their lives. A powerstretcher, and knee kicker can be rented, but it takes some knowlegde to know how to use them properly. You will need more tools then a utility knife.

$2.75 a yard or a foot? There are 9 sq ft in one sq yard of carpet. I'd say if that is a per foot price, you have plenty of cash to get a good carpet.
 
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Old 02-21-01, 09:27 AM
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CDW
My $2.75 was per square foot. I have not looked into this a whole lot yet, but I may go for an install job where I need a seam and do it myself for the rest. I have put down vinyl flooring before and small rooms with foam pad backers, but I have not used tacker pads and stretched carpet before. The main place I am looking to do my self is an area 12' x 24' approx. This will meet up with a new laminate floor. Can I get a good stain resistant carpet with install for $2.75 a Square foot?
Dan
 
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Old 02-22-01, 09:50 PM
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Angry Just give us an answer!

I am so fed up with the lack of information available over the internet on laying carpet. I've come to the conclusion that it must be so easy to do that no one wants to let the homeowner know so they can save a bit of money by doing it themself--or else, why not give out the information? If it's really that complicated, any intelligent person could tell by reading the instructions whether they're getting in over their head or not. Either that, or at least we are given the choice of messing the whole thing up. I guess that would teach me! As far as I'm concerned, I'm going to find out how to lay carpet, do it for my friends and myself, and never pay the ridiculous prices (more than some carpets themselves!) being charged just to install one square yard of carpet.
 
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Old 02-23-01, 05:23 AM
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I could write a book, it would take me every bit of 3 hours or more sitting here typing, to cover every aspect of residential Carpet installations. Different styles of carpets take different methods.(cut pile, loop pile berbers, level loop, wool, axminster, karastan, action-bac, soft-bac, PVC, and many more).

A picture is worth a million words in carpet installation!
Light sources and seam placement play a crucial roll in carpet installation.

If you search back, in the posts past 30 days you will see where I have posted a reply more then once, on how to install different types of carpet. They however were more specific when they posted what they needed, what they were using and where it was going, and what subfloor it was going over. Ok I'll write a book below.....Hope you get the picture, bare with me.

Nail tackstrip around the edges of the room. Keeping it back off the baseboards no farther then 3/8". It will need to be closer to the baseboard, the thinner the carpet is. Transitions to other flooring will need Z-bar, or a finishing metal.

Roll the pad out opposite of the way you have decided to roll out your carpet. Glue to concrete and staple to wood subfloor at the perimeter and seams, you may want to tape the seams also, but noise transfer may happen when carpet gets placed on the pad tape. Trim the pad back just behind the tackstrip.

Cut your carpet 3" longer then the area your working in, for stretching ease, when it comes time to stretch. Roll it out.
Row cut your length for the seam if there is one(room wider then 12') with an awl & topcutter.

Row cut your fill piece with the awl & topcutter.

Place seam tape under the seam area, and the latex(seam sealer) the edges of the carpet that will be seamed together.
Don't get any latex on the carpet nap!!!!! Let it dry!!!!

Slide your fill piece in place after the latex has dried thoroughly.

Use a carpet seam iron set on a medium setting, you don't want it so hot it melts the nylon in the carpet backing. Just enough heat to melt the hot melt glue on the seam tape. Don't leave the iron in one spot too long, and try to keep the backing from sitting on the hot iron!!

Push the iron forward the length of the iron and place the carpet on and in the hot melt glue on the tape. NO GAPS & NO OVERLAPPING!!!!! Keep the nap out of the hot melt, trapping it in the seam. Keep fluffing the nap out with your thumbs as you push it into the hot melt. Now rub it with your hand, or a carpet tractor. Slide a piece of wood with a lot of weight on the seam where you just worked it. Remember don't leave the iron in one spot too long!!! So you will need to do this quickly. Continue and finish the seam and let it cool off about 15 minutes.

Now for the stretching!! If there is a doorway seamed to more carpet, you will need to powerstretch pulling through that doorway first.(hallways always get stetched first, then rooms seamed on) Then set the carpet on the tackstrip along the wall closest, to either the left or right of the door way with a knee kicker. Now pull with a powerstretch away from the wall you just set on the tackstrip just one stretcher head width(one time) closest to the wall the doorway is on. Swing the powerstretcher out of the way, and now set the carpet on the tackstrip along the wall the doorawy is on. Swing the powerstretcher back where you just moved it from to set the wall on the tackstrip, and make the next stretch down the wall, and continue, keeping the powerstretcher tail in the same place on the opposite wall from 2-3 more stretches so you are stretching at a slight angle. Go all the way to the corner. Now spin the powerstretcher and begin stretching where you made your first stretch in the room and continue to the corners.

Now it's time to trim and tuck. With a wall trimmer go down the baseboard, making sure it cuts a tad long(up the baseboard ever so slightly) now tuck the carpet in the gully between the tackstrip and the baseboard, using a hook blade carpet knife, or a putty knife. You can also use a razor blade to trim, but don't cut against the baseboards. Fold the carpet and cut from the carpet backing, but be sure not to cut it too long or too short. Trim the transitions to other flooring.

Now stand back and look at your work, say damn I'm good and whip out the vacuum.

There I wrote a book anyway! You can send the checks to my publisher

For more info come to the Floor Covering Installers Bulletin Board, where these best flooring installers in the world hang out and discuss all aspects of flooring.
http://www.i-boards.com/bnp/fci/




[Edited by Carpets Done Wright on 02-23-01 at 07:38]
 
  #6  
Old 03-08-01, 03:12 PM
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I was an installer for 24 years. I can't tell you how many times I was asked to fix carpet that "do-it-yourselfers" had tried to do themselves. It's not difficult to install carpet, just difficult to do it right. I don't know where you shopped that labor was more than the carpet, but I might be willing to go back to installing if that's the case. If you think that installers are just trying to protect their easy, high paying jobs, go ahead and do it yourself. It will cost more to fix it than if you had had it done professionally in the first place.
 
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Old 03-08-01, 09:47 PM
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I tried to tell them that in my first response. If it is a room without seams, it can be done. It might look ragged but at least there won't be a black line(seam) staring them in the face. Installing carpet properly and to floorcovering standards, so it doesn't look like the butcher came in with a chain saw, it is an art only to be tacked by a ceritified carpet artist. I've seen installations from retail flooring stores that looked like the amature hour too. Flooring retailers hire sub-contractors and hire the ones who charge the least. You get what you pay for!!!

I too would like to know who charges as much per yard as the carpet itself! I charge $3 per yard for cut pile carpets, that are under 40oz face weight. and add .75 per yard for over 40 oz. I charge $4 for berber loop pile under 40 oz face weight and add .75 for over 40 oz. I add $1 per yard for moving furniture. and I charge $1 for take up and hauling off the old carpet. Now get a retail store and they pay their "Hacks" $2 per yard for it all. You can just imagine how many corners get cut trying to make any money. At that price if they were to do it right they would make average $3 per hour. So corners get cut to bring their hourly pay up, and then it may be $5 average. Guess what you get....What you pay for, and it will show!!!
 
 

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