Gully Width & Gap Under Baseboard Recommendation


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Old 03-30-14, 12:29 AM
J
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Gully Width & Gap Under Baseboard Recommendation

I'm getting our upstairs (Stairs + 3 bedrooms) prepped for new carpet. I have basically ripped everything out (carpet/pad, tack strips, baseboard) and am starting from scratch.

We've narrowed carpet down to a cut-pile textured carpet with a lower profile because of the high traffic on the stairs and the masking of footprints. We liked carpets in the 50 oz face weight range, with a pile height of .55"-.65".

So my question: What gully width do you recommend and how high should I float the baseboard? The baseboard is the standard 3 1/2" stuff (1/2" thick) if that matters.

According to the CRI, the gulley width should be slightly less than the carpet height, but not to exceed 3/8". Sounds like I should just go with 3/8"? (btw, tackstrips I pulled out had a gulley of 1"-1.25" )

I've read about people floating the baseboard 1/2", but that is without knowing what carpet height they had. With a carpet height of .55"-.65", should I do 1/2" float or make it a little more snug and do 3/8"?

I appreciate the advice!
 
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Old 03-30-14, 03:28 AM
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We normally use pieces of baseboard to space it 1/2" high, which allows sufficient tucking room. If yours calls for 3/8", you need to stick with that. Check with the manufacturer or the people who will be laying it.
 
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Old 03-30-14, 04:43 AM
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As Larry stated, 1/2" is the norm but if you have get a low pile carpet it might be less and unless you want to install shoemold if the base is too high - contact the carpet installer [store might know] to find out what height the base should be.

Some diyers wait until after the carpet install to install the base, if you go that route, prime and enamel the base first! You'll still have to putty/caulk and apply the final coat of paint but you can cheat and not paint all the way down to the carpet.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 12:08 AM
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Thanks guys for the input. I think I'm just going to go with 1/2", with a 3/8" gully. The carpet that I think we'll be getting has a pile height of 0.55" (that would be the minimum of the carpets we were looking at), but even at that height the 1/2" gap shouldn't be too much. I realized that the carpet has to go over the 1/4" thick tack strip, down into the gulley and tucked under the base; the tack strip will push the carpet up a bit.

Mark, I read the many, many debates online about which goes last: trim or carpet. I've decided to install trim first and leave the carpet as the very last step mainly because I want to have rooms completely done without worrying about new carpet. That means I can paint/cut/caulk the trim all in the room. Seems like the quickest way to do it since I won't be running up and down stairs cutting and re-cutting trim pieces.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 04:46 AM
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Builders almost always have the base installed/finished prior to carpet installation and that is my preferred way of doing it ...... I just wanted you to be aware of the options
 
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Old 03-31-14, 11:04 AM
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Technically, the base is not supposed to be raised. Some installers like it raised, some don't. The tack strip is actually cut at an angle, so when the carpet is tucked between it and the base, the carpet will be locked in. But, most builders raise it. Either one will work. I personally, like the base on the floor. Putting the base on after the carpet is installed is a bad idea. If it would ever need to be restretched, dried after a water leak or replaced, the base may need to be removed. That will result in it needing repainted and maybe the wall too.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 10:38 AM
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Well we picked out some carpet. Ended up with a 60oz texture style with a pile height of 5/8"-3/4". Unfortunately the installer manager would not give his recommendation on a height, since he had problems with a customer in the past not liking the finished product after he gave a recommendation. I don't know how he could be held liable when giving me a "suggestion", but whatever. I'm going to go with a 1/2"...I think that will be best from what you guys said.

Also, after talking to a handful of carpet people (salesmen), I was surprised by how many of them said, "Well, you have the thickness of the carpet plus the thickness of the pad..." when I asked them about the gap height. After correcting them and letting them know the pad doesn't go past the tack strip, I stopped listening to them because they didn't know what they were talking about. Seems like that if you sell carpet, you should have at least some idea of how the carpet is installed /rant
 
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Old 04-03-14, 01:17 PM
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Many carpet sales people, especially at the big box stores, have no idea about installation. Most of them were selling plumbing or lumber last week.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 01:19 PM
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And the padding terminates at the tack strip and does not extend to the tuck.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 01:22 PM
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Usually the one that does the work/installation knows more than a salesman Occasionally a salesman will have previously worked with the product but mostly they just know what they read or been told. IMO it's best to get advice from the ones that actually do the work, true for any trade.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 02:48 PM
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That's why I volunteer here. I have been installing flooring since 1973.
 
 

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