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kitchen anti-fatigue mat over cement floor with infloor radiant heating

kitchen anti-fatigue mat over cement floor with infloor radiant heating


  #1  
Old 05-04-22, 08:51 PM
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kitchen anti-fatigue mat over cement floor with infloor radiant heating

Kitchen. Cement floor with infloor radiant heat. Would like anti-fatigue mat for area by sink.

So we bought one from uline. Found it disintegrated and stuck to the cement. Uline said the one we picked is known to stick in areas of high humidity and heat. Huh? That was not in the description. So lifted it up and cleaned up the mess and now back to zero. Uline could not recommend any.

Question
What anti-fatigue mat will work in a kitchen over cement floor with infloor radiant heat? By work I guess we mean transmit the infloor heating but not stick to the floor.

Thanks

Loren
 
  #2  
Old 05-05-22, 07:25 AM
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You have almost opposing requirements. You want the heat to pass through but you want something like foam (insulator) for the squishiness. I would look at a open type construction. I've seen door mats made from flip flop soles. There are large open areas so heat can pass through. You can also consider an industrial rubber mat that has holes. They are not the most attractive and don't offer a squishy feel but they do provide some cushioning. You could also look at woven natural fiber matts. They will build up heat but should be resistant to sticking.
 
  #3  
Old 05-05-22, 07:40 AM
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How about anti fatigue shoes?
 
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Old 05-05-22, 07:42 AM
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A thin underlayment (1/4 inch plywood, metal, or plastic--like a desk chair pad) will still allow some heat to transmit although not as much as bare concrete. The heat may not be noticeable but the effect will still be the "absence of cold" that radiant heat provides.
 
  #5  
Old 05-05-22, 12:13 PM
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thanks all

ok what if we say
this would be small 3x5' area so no heat transmit is Ok

would that change anything? make product search less complex?

Loren


 
 

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