Insulating old garage walls [Relocated Thread]

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  #1  
Old 02-12-12, 04:40 AM
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Insulating old garage walls [Relocated Thread]

Hello All,

Just signed on and want to say first of all, that I am very impressed with this DIY forum. I see it has very knowledgable members supporting it and is a well administered site. Kudos to all on here for making those things happen. Now some information leading to my question that I need help with ..

We have a 1968 vintage home with an attached garage that has a brick exterior, exterior walls consist of 2x4 wood studs on 16 in. O.C. with a finish of painted 1/2 inch drywall. The exterior stud walls have the 1/2 inch thick foil skinned exterior sheathing on them. I have discovered that the exterior walls of the garage are not insulated which was normal for 1968 vintage homes.. .

I would like to tinker in the garage in the winter but, have no heat in it. The ceiling of the garage has 12 inches of of cellulose in it, as I blew it in myself. We were rushed to get moved in, so I have already stocked my tools and the outside walls have LOTS of shelves that are stocked tightly....

The question: Is there any way to insulate these exterior garage walls without making a major mess of the garage and getting in to drywall damage/repairs ? Thanks in advance
 
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  #2  
Old 02-12-12, 06:09 AM
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Careful what you call vintage, I'm significantly older than your home .
And welcome to the forum.
If you have standard 2x4 wall cavities with rigid sheathing on the outside and drywall on the inside, then blowing in some of the cellulose is an option, but you will have holes to patch where ever you need to access those stud bays. If the house is ready for new siding, then something might be done from the outside under the new siding.

If that exterior sheathing is not rigid enough to take the pressure of dense packed cellulose, then possibly some blown in fiberglass, but I prefer the newspaper.

If you like to bring your wet or snow covered cars inside to dry, then some thinking about where that moisture is going to go is necessary. A cold garage with lots of air leaks usually just exchanges air with the outside. But once you start preparing to heat that space, you tend to reduce the leakage and introduce warm much more humid air.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-12, 07:09 AM
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Thank you for your reply....

Yes, there would be wet cars/snow melting going on in the garage. I am familiar with the cellulose blowing in existing walls. To use "blow in" cellulose, means everything would have to come of out the garage, as the dust would permeate everything and wow, thats a LOT of stuff.

I know insulation technology has come a long way since I was blowing cellulose for a living back in early 70's. Has anyone come up with a way to do this a project like this without the dust mess and patching all of those drywall penetration holes/painting again ? ...

Is there maybe something in a blow in foam, that just requires a 3/4 in hole be drilled for each stud space for the nozzle ? I could then just run a "chair rail " molding around the walls to cover up the holes. ...

Isnt it funny how when one gets "long in the tooth" they look for the easist way to do something ?
 
  #4  
Old 02-12-12, 07:29 AM
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dust isn't a major issue. when your done, use a leaf blower to blow out the garage.
 
  #5  
Old 02-12-12, 07:59 AM
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There are some slow rise foam products, but I have no experience with them. My general impression is they would be expensive.

I've worked around offices full of electronic equipment when they had to grind concrete and a bunch of plastic and a positive pressure behind the plastic did wonders. Especially being a garage I would think even close to good would suffice. But maybe I'm thinking of my garage, it needed the plastic 30 years ago.

Bud
 
  #6  
Old 02-12-12, 12:28 PM
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I never thought of that, good one ! I will just have to send my wife away and insulate it and then leaf blow it clean. My wife is the Queen of Clean and she hates this attached garage anyway, as anything on the garage floor gets tracked right in to the kitchen regardless of how much I scrub my feet on the door mat. ...

Our previous home had the garage detached. A oversight on my part on this home we bought, but we are stuck with it. I like the attached garage though, its at least, "warmer" than the outside temps for my car, even if it is not heated. Thanks all, as it looks like blown in cellulose it will be.
 
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