Sears Kenmore Model 2142

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  #1  
Old 06-30-07, 07:21 AM
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Sears Kenmore Model 2142

I am considering buying a used Kenmore 2142 sewing machine which is on sale at a local swap meet. Problem is that the seller does not have a users manual and I have not been able to locate one online.

The machine was demo'd and works well but was in zig-zag mode. The seller did not know how to make it sew straight.

Is anyone faliliar with this model? If so, could you describe how to make it sew straight? Is there a switch or button, or does it require a changeout of a part (accessory).

Thanks in advance for any info you can give on this model.

MrTobor
 
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  #2  
Old 06-30-07, 07:53 AM
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I'm not familar with that exact model (I used to own a 60's Kenmore but no longer have it to look at) and without seeing it, I'm not sure where the width would be adjusted, so I'll do some research and see what I can find out and get back to you on it.
 
  #3  
Old 06-30-07, 09:20 AM
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OK, found out a little something. Altho when it comes to sewing machines the oldies are the best, this model must not have been real popular as I have checked all my sources and can't find a manual for it, but I think most of the ones from that age group are so similar, you may find one for a similar model. There should be 3 numbers before the 2142 (such as 148, 158, etc.) which is important when looking for parts and manuals.
As for the machine stuck in zig zag, lift the lid on top and use a blow dryer to heat up the insides, as something may be frozen and this will undo it. Then it probably needs a good oiling, which (lack of) is what would freeze up the insides.
If this doesn't work, then probably something is broke and is probably not worth the money to have it fixed. Don't know what they're asking for it but I wouldn't pay more than $5 or $10 for it, FWIW.
 
  #4  
Old 07-02-07, 07:41 AM
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Thank you Shadeladie for your quick response and investigation. Actually, I made this post on behalf of my wife (who is the seamstress in the family and was the one who actually saw the machine).

She is not very *technical* so it's quite possible she didn't get the real model number. I agree though, it's probably not worth the effort. Thanks again.
 
  #5  
Old 02-27-11, 05:25 PM
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Sears Kenmore Model 2142 is a GREAT sewing machine!

Previous posts make it appear the Sears Kenmore Model 2142 sewing machine is not a reliable or desirable sewing machine, and I definitely want people to know that the Sears Kenmore Model 2142 is an extremely good sewing machine! It is an all metal model, with very simple mechanics, which makes it very simple to use, & very easy to maintain and repair, if ever necessary. My mom & I each have our own 2142, and use them to make our own clothing, curtains, quilting, etc... The only repair I have had to do to mine, was that when I purchased it, it had been left in a shed in NC for 20 or so years, without being cleaned & oiled. I cleaned it up, oiled it, and because it had been left on the widest zig zag stitch, with the zig zag cam in it, the spring that pulls the mechanical parts between straight stitch & zig zag stitch, had worn out from being stretched for so long! I spent $1.29 at Ace Hardware for a pack of 2 replacement springs, & the machine has worked flawlessly since then!

All 44 or 45 Sears Kenmore "C" cams fit this machine, regardless of whether they are green, orange, or cream colored! It does incredible satin stitch embroidery, and you can adjust how long or short you want those design stitches to be, by adjusting the +/- buttonhole/reverse stitch length control knob on the back of the sewing machine. This machine uses the standard class 15 bobbin & bobbin case, the cheapest and easiest bobbins & bobbin cases to find anywhere! You can control both stitch width & stitch length with the stitch width dial & stitch length/reverse lever on the front of the machine. Reversing is quick & easy by lifting the stitch length lever to the highest position, then moved back down to the stitch length you have set by spinning the thumbscrew inside the stitch length lever. The bobbin winder is on the top of the machine, and automatically stops winding when the bobbin is full.

This is a low shank sewing machine, so nearly all low shank sewing machine feet will fit the 2142 (or 158.960), including those labelled Greist, Singer, or Simanco. Low shank attachments available include ruffler, pleater, tucker, edgestitchers, shirring feet, rolled hemmers for a variety of widths, binders, you can even purchase off brand low shank "cut-n-sew" attachments which trim your seam as you sew a zig zag stitch which finishes the seam, creating an "overlock" stitch, similar to a serger.

The huge variety of stitches includes straight stitches, of course, & a variety of stretch stitches, as well as utility stitches, including the blind hem stitch. A chainstitch is also possible, you just have to have the bobbin insert, and narrow plate, usually available on ebay, in the Sears Kenmore Sewing Machine (buttonholer/monogrammer/cam) attachment sets either the pale green stacking plastic cases, or the vinyl "books". The chainstitch pieces are usually in a small rectangular plastic case with a clear cover, about 1 1/2 inches by 3/4 of an inch or so. While the majority of the "top of the line" Sears Kenmore sewing machines were high shank sewing machines, you can use all of the same stitch design cams they use, you just need to look for low shank feet & attachments. For greater success when sewing stretch fabrics, use either the Kenmore Q stretch needles, or any brand of standard household 15x1 "ball tip" stretch needle.

Don't be scared off the great Sears Kenmore mechanical sewing machines, they are super easy to use, very inexpensive to buy & maintain, and are extremely smooth running, reliable sewing machines, and while they are NOT an industrial sewing machine, they are a very heavy duty sewing machine! Enjoy your 2142!
 
  #6  
Old 02-27-11, 05:38 PM
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Another oddity regarding Sears Kenmore Sewing Machines- while all of the repair people I have checked with have said that the model number of Sears Kenmore sewing machines is the first 3 or 4 numbers to the right of the decimals on the nomenclature plates, many of the manuals have another set of numbers entirely. My Sears Kenmore model 2142 has the nomenclature plate number of 158.960, which technically would make it model #960, but according to the Sears Kenmore Sewing Machine manuals, my machine is model 2142. There seems to be a very long period of time where the Kenmore sewing machine models did not seem to change much- they didn't need to, they did everything that any other sewing machine did, and because the only real differences between the different "model" was which set of attachments & accessories were sold with them. The more you paid, the more stitch cams, attachments & accessories you got with your machine.
 
  #7  
Old 10-19-11, 04:06 PM
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Talking Sears Kenmore Model 2142 sewing machine

To Mr Tobor -- tobor8man

Just to let you know -- the User Manual for the Sears Kenmore Sewing Machine Model 330 is the User manual for your Model 2142 machine!!!!! I know, as I have that sewing machine!!!!! Hope this helps you out!!!!!

:
 
  #8  
Old 10-19-11, 04:10 PM
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Red face

All I can tell you is this -- this particular machine was my mothere's from 1960 and, when she moved in 2002, I took that machine. I took it to a repair shop that did work on Kenmore and Singer machines, and I was told that this was a damn good machine -- as heavy as hell, but a damn good machine!!! It was WELL WORTH the $100.00 to get it refurbished after sitting in my mother's basement for years AND, sitting in my attic for years!!!!!
 
  #9  
Old 10-21-11, 09:02 AM
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This most may be too late for you; however, in order for the Singer Sewing Machine (M0del 2142) to stop with the zig-zag stitches -- you must have that slider on number zero!!! Also, if you can get a heold of the User Manual for the Model 330 Sears Kenmore Sewing Machine -- that's the SAME one as model 2141!!!!! Hope this has helped you, or, anyone else out there. That machine is TOTALLY WORTH having fixed up and overhauled!! It's a TRUE WORKHORSE of a sewing machine!!!!
 
  #10  
Old 12-03-11, 08:16 AM
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Have Kenmore Model 35/2142?

My mother has a Kenmore sewing machine. The manual states Model 35, but the plate on the back of the machine states 2142. We do not see any other numbers. My sister would like to use it but the belt for the hand wheel is missing. Does anyone know where to get a belt? If not, we plan on selling the machine, for parts or whatever.

Thanks,
Karen
 
  #11  
Old 12-03-11, 08:36 AM
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Smile Reply to karenls70

Karenls70 -- I also have that model (2142) and I also needed a belt. My husband was able to go to a repair center that specialized in Singer & Kenmore sewing machines and he got a "universal" belt. This was the same place I had this machine overhauled. Is this machine their "portable" machine that weighs over 40 pounds and is all metal!! If so GET IT OVERHAULED/REPAIRED!!! THIS machine is a TOTAL WORKHORSE and is WELL WORTH the cost of overhaul/repair!! I spent $100.00 to get mine overhauled -- it used to be my mother's and is from the 60's and is MUCH better than the newer one I have, which, has all PLASTIC PARTS!!! My machine is the Model 33, but has the same number as yours - 2142. Mine is the zig-zag machine. The part number for the Motor Rubber Bels is 60902. Hope that helps!!
 
  #12  
Old 04-20-12, 10:02 PM
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Sears Kenmore Sewing Machines Model 33 or 35 or 2142 or 96 or 158.960

Yes, I forgot to answer the earlier question about how to get the machine off the zig zag stitch! Oops! Tabor8man, to change it from a zig zag stitch to a straight stitch, you can either turn the stitch width down to 0, and/or you can remove the cam under the door on top of the machine. It will only do a zig zag stitch if it has a zig zag cam in the machine, and has the stitch width turned up above 0.

The greatest advantage of these Japanese made heavy metal sewing machine treasures, is that they are extremely simple, mechanically! The ONLY reason you see posts from Bernina & other brand sewing machine repair technicians that claim the old metal Kenmores are only good for using as an anchor, is because the Kenmores almost NEVER break down, & if they do, you can easily fix them yourself if you can find the parts!

That means that the technicians for the most expensive brand name sewing machines are not getting paid any money to fix or maintain your sewing machine, because it is so easy, you can do it yourself! The only all metal old Kenmore sewing machines that would be considered only good for boat anchors, were the ones made by New Process Gear, a division of Chrysler, in the U.S.A.. You can easily identify them by their manufacturer code on the metal nomenclature tag on the machine. 120 are the first 3 numbers before the decimal point. You can easily identify them, not only by the numbers, but you can see Chrysler design in their ugly shapes, they look like they are supposed to be an old automobile accessory, not a sewing machine.

My favorite old metal Kenmore sewing machines were made by Jaguar/Maruzen in Japan mostly, but a few in Taiwan, their manufacturer identification code is 158, and the ones beginning with 148 were also made in Japan, & are high quality machines. To be perfectly honest, these old metal Kenmores are almost worth their weight in gold, to anyone who really sews a lot, & really are worth several hundred dollars, particularly if they have their manual & accessories!

The only reason many perfectly good sewing machines are sold for as low as $10, is because of the super cheap clothing available due to the unfair trade status caused by the Free Trade agreements made by foolish and/or dishonest, greedy politicians who literally gave away American jobs, by making laws that made it easier for wealthy American business owners to shut down their American factories, & re open them in Mexico, China, India, & other countries with super low wages, no worker protection laws, so the laborers can be abused, forced to work inhumane hours, & in dangerous labor conditions, and there are no laws in place to protect consumers from unsafe chemicals or other dangers in items made in countries with no consumer safety laws.

If Americans & other wealthier countries still had to sew their own clothing, or pay others to make their clothing, the prices of these high quality used sewing machines would be at least $500, & if they have more special stitches & accessories, they would be around $1,500.

While I wouldn't mind if someone gave me a new computerized sewing machine, and I would definitely try it out, I suspect that I would still prefer these great metal, mechanical Sears Kenmore Sewing Machines for most of my sewing!

While I do love many of the European sewing machines made around the same time as these old Kenmores, the European sewing machines are much more complicated mechanically, making them more likely to need repairs done by a factory certified technician for the brand of the specific sewing machine. I do love the mechanical Bernina's with their special presser feet, tiny darning & embroidery hoop, accessory case, free arm & extension table, extremely informative manuals, & wonderful carry cases, as well as the Elna Supermatics with 100 or so different stitch cams available, well designed presser feet, accessory cases & incredible metal sewing case which fits around the freearm, making a large sewing table!

OK, if you can't tell, I LOVE any good sewing machines, & the easier they are to sew with & maintain, the better I love them! Having well written sewing machine manuals with lots of photos, a broad range of stitches, accessories & attachments, as well as a well designed carry case, really does impact my decision when choosing which one to be my "one & only" sewing machine! I have more than 22 right now, so you can see I'm not doing very well in the choosing department! LOL!
Becky in NC tumorfarmer
 
  #13  
Old 06-21-12, 01:57 PM
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Bobbin case

My bobbin case in the machine had to be taken apart. I can't find the book. How do you put it back together? I love my machine...
 
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