Torn cushion from back of sofa

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  #1  
Old 02-23-12, 11:59 AM
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Torn cushion from back of sofa

I searched around and did not find my issue. Some close though.

The top left corner of the cushion has torn out of it's seam were it was sew into the back of the couch. The tear is about 18 long and I have no lip to sew it to.

I did buy a Singer hosed hold needle pack and upholstery thread.

The stuffing is exposed and it's a relatively a clean edge that was torn out.

Any advice on how to sew this all back?

It's ok if I don't have it perfect, I just need it to hold.

Can I load up a picture some how?

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 02-23-12, 01:01 PM
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Hi and welcome to the forum!
That's a tough one because hand stitching may not be strong enough for the stress on a cushion, especially when the fabric tore like that.
Anyways, I don't know what a Singer hosed hold needle pack is, but just use a thin one in the pack (because you don't want to be making large holes if you used a fat needle).
Also, you're better off using regular polyester thread (I use Gutermann) rather than upholstery thread. Upholstery thread has it's purpose, but not for cushion repair.
You'll want to do a ladder stitch. Do a google search to find out how. There are video's on youtube also. The ladder stitch is more invisible and gives a strong hold.
Just pin the two sides together and start sewing at least 1/4" away from the torn fabric. Make small stitches.
Good luck!
 
  #3  
Old 02-23-12, 01:48 PM
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Hello and thank you.

Sorry. It's a house hold needle pack. It came with Canvas/Carpet/Leather/Sacks & Upholstery needles made be Singer.

Ok, use a polyester thread and small ladder stitches. Got it. I will go forth and learn how to do that stitch and then give it a try.

This is going to be tough. It's a hard back with fabric sewn over the top of it with a seam 3 inches down from the top were the back cushion was sewn into.

Thanks, Ill come back when done... Not today...
 
  #4  
Old 03-05-12, 07:29 AM
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Tips for reinforcing torn upholstery fabric

Hello! I've had to do a similar repair in the past. The stitching will hold better if you back the repair area seams with wide cotton twill tape (a 1" strip of heavy denim will do too). It will be a bit stiff to stitch into, but it will hold great!
Cut the strips so they fall 1" past the end of where your repair begins and ends. Pin everything in place. The strips will be on the wrong side (inside) of the fabric (picture a sandwich -the cushion fabric is sandwiched between the cotton strips).
When you begin stitching, start 1/2-1" before the tear, pinch the seam sides together, and bar-tack (stitch done in place X3) the first stitch. Finish your repair the same way. Be sure to use a matching heavy thread (upholstery thread is best, but doubling regular thread should be okay too). If you really want to go crazy, run a bit of beeswax over the thread first. -It helps prevent fraying while stitching.
You can use a mattress stitch, a whip stitch, or if you are really, really obsessive -a hidden quilter's stitch (a bit more complicated but really cool results)!
I didn't see what kind of fabric you are sewing, but I find for the heavier stuff (e.g. leather, ultrasuede, fabrics with a coated backing) I like to use a tri-point upholstery needle. It is straight, it pierces well, and it doesn't snap off if you have to tug on it.
One more thing. If the fabric tore at the original seam, don't sew on that same seam. Take it in at least a 1/4 ", reinforce with the strips, and then stitch, tapering to the original seam line at the ends. If it was only the stitching that came loose, then you are good to go! Whew!
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-12, 08:31 AM
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Hello slave2home and welcome to the forum!
Sorry, but I have to disagree with some of what you say.
You do not want to start off a hand stitch with a bartack, rather make a couple of stitches with a small knot.
A needle with a three edge blade will be too big for a your cushion. You'll end up making holes that are much too big and will just end up tearing the fabric yet more.
You want to use poly thread, not upholstery thread, which you can double if you want.
Running beeswax on your thread will keep the thread from knotting, but does not keep fabric from fraying.
A mattress stitch is used in knitting, it doesn't apply here.
A whip stitch will not be strong enough.
I have no idea what a hidden quilter's stitch is. Please show us this stitch if there is such a thing. The ladder stitch is best for joining two edges of fabric.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-12, 11:52 PM
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Response to shadeladie

Hello,
I scanned down the thread and I did not see what type of fabric the cushion was made from. If it is from a lightweight cotton (or similar light, easy tearing fabric) you are correct, -the tri-point needle may make too big a hole. If it is very heavy fabric (like heavy denim, standard upholstery fabric with backing, etc), I beg to differ as the tri-point would make penetrating the fabric easier and make a more secure hole as the needle is designed to push threads apart, not cut them and weaken them. If it is vinyl, a tiny needle hole and reinforcing the back of the seam might work. Using a steam-a-seam product may work better if she can figure a way to get it ironed to the back of the new seam for reinforcement...

As for the mattress stitch, I know it to be used in embroidery, surgery, knitting, crocheting, upholstery, and mending. I am wondering if the definitions from our two areas differs greatly and the term may mean something completely different in yours. To me, a mattress stitch is a continuous stitch that adjoins two seams together, snugging them into a seam with a tensioned stitch that casts over the edges in a looping fashion. It is then secured by bartacking (doing the same stitch in place 3 times and knotting it).

The hidden quilter's stitch is nothing more than a hidden slipstitch. -The true hidden quilters stitch is done with a tiny quilting needle and tiny stitches under the edge of applique pieces, but the principle is the same with upholstery if you want the stitches to be nearly invisible. Maybe you have a different name for it? I have my doubts it would hold together fabric points that have a lot of stress -a mattress or ladder stitch would be stronger.
My apologies for not being able to post a picture as I am not sure how to do so.
 
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