Pine plank flooring

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  #1  
Old 09-23-02, 07:11 PM
A
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Pine plank flooring

My sister wants to put in a pine plank floor (I warned her already about the wear and stability of pine but it's already pine planks upstairs). I checked around for T&G pine planks all I was able to find is reclaimed heartwood which is more expensive than most hardwoods.

I beginning to think that perhaps I should just buy some clear pine boards and put in the T&G myself. I'm concerned however that typical pine boards are not milled accurate enough (i.e. straightness).

Is it posssible to get pine planks with T&G that is not reclaimed?

I don't particularly care if my floors came from the side of an 17th century barn or the bottom of a lake.
 
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  #2  
Old 09-24-02, 01:07 PM
Locy's Hardwood
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Pine Planks

Yes it is possible to by them. They come in a variety of widths (up to 12 in wide) I recently installed 400 sqft at $2.99/sqft my cost.
Its was likn dried T & G Comes in select & better and #2 go to www.walkonwood.com they were my supplier for this job

Phil
 
  #3  
Old 09-27-02, 09:56 AM
Herve
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Both Home Depot and Lowes in my town carry T&G pine planks, but they're not in the flooring section. They're in with lumber. They are actually "reversible" 1x4 boards. On one side, they are milled into "wainscotting" (two 1 3/4" beaded grooves), but on the other they are smooth planks. Most of them are even knot-free. I have a neighbor who installed these and stained them to look like heart-pine. It's amazing. I'm about to do the same. At about $1.60 sq ft, you can't go wrong. They also come in 1x6.
 
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Old 09-27-02, 10:05 AM
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Thanks alot!
 
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Old 09-29-02, 05:59 AM
Locy's Hardwood
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Beware

Alex
Beware of this product it is not made for flooring and can be unstable when used as flooring. Choosing the proper product for the right installation is key. You may see the money you think you are saving double in the cost of replacement when the product fails. Just my opinion.
Philly
 
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Old 09-30-02, 12:45 PM
marcthornton
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Alex,

Philintoni said it best. This is not the bast choice of floors and i hope you will reconsider.

You want longevity, durabilty, and resistance in your flor.

It is just my opinion but i do not believe the type you are considering is beat.

Good luck !
 
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Old 09-30-02, 01:35 PM
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I trust you guys and I'll take your advice but isn't wood for flooring cut the same as wood used for other purposes?

Or are you concerned about the moisture content?

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 09-30-02, 03:43 PM
Locy's Hardwood
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Yes most wood is cut the same for construction as it is for flooring but the process and methods vary when purchasing flooring the flooring itself is cut and dried in a certain manor thus taking care of excess moisture and flaws found in common lumber. Milling is key. when a piece of wood is milled for a certain application ie t&g pine for walls and ceillings the amount of overwood is not addressed because of the v groove that takes care of over and underwood but when the same piece of lumber is milled for flooring the spects are very different a varience of 1/32 to 1/16 when dealing with a v groove you can deal with 1/8 to 1/4 of varience. Leading to a lot more sanding and dicking around with getting it to look right.
Philly
 
  #9  
Old 09-30-02, 04:23 PM
Herve
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Guys, I certainly don't want to steer anyone in the wrong direction with my suggestion on these pine planks, and I appreciate you taking the time to share your knowledge with the rest of us! Flooring is not my area of specialty.

However, I still don't understand the objection to using these boards as flooring.

In an earlier post, somone mentioned the expense of having to ultimately replace this pine.
In the latest post, the objection is not with having to replace it prematurely, but with the specs on the v-groove, and concerns installation.

All I can say is this: 1) Home Depot's "SKU" tag lists this pine as reversible flooring. 2) My neighbor has had this down for years and it looks great. 3) If moisture was a problem, these boards would warp and buckle on the walls & ceilings, too, but obviously they don't (they're used in bathrooms, etc).

For me (and others may disagree), the beauty of pine flooring is that it is not as perfect and uniform as other types of floors. Sometimes it has knots, slightly-ugly grain, it dents very easily, etc - but that's what pine is.

And, if you're trying to match older-pine floors, I can guarantee they weren't milled to within a 1/16" or 1/32" spec.

I plan on putting this down in the next couple of weeks, and who knows...? MAYBE installation will be a nightmare, and MAYBE I'll think it was a bad idea, but I doubt it.

Again, I'm not trying to be rude, I'm not trying to cause problems, but I think this lumber is worth a second glance.

Just my 2 cents....
Herve
 
  #10  
Old 09-30-02, 06:19 PM
hokiecoyote
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T&G

I put the Pine T&G on my ceiling and it turned out great. The only problem I see with using this as flooring would be the V grooves someone mentioned before. They were pretty consistent in size but large. It seems as though this would complicate the finishing process.

My only other comment has to do with nailing. If you plan on using a flooring nailer then the tongue has to be very precise. There's no way the pine I used could be fastened with a flooring nailer.

Your idea is great and what you've said makes perfect sense to me. I guess what it all boils down to is sweat equity. Anything is possible, it just takes time. Good luck!!
 
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Old 10-08-02, 09:10 AM
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HokieCoyote,

If you can't use a flooring nailer then did you tongue nail at all?

I can't imagine that face nails alone would hold up.

-Alex
 
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Old 10-08-02, 06:11 PM
hokiecoyote
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T&G Ceiling

We face nailed to the rafters through the v-ditch after each piece was put in place. In other words, we nailed through both the tongue and groove at the same time. Since we were using a notty pine the holes were not as noticeable.

As for the flooring nailer, I just tried nailing a scrap piece of the leftover pine T&G to the floor since I'm also installing wood flooring. As I suspected, the tongue of the T&G really throws off the flooring nailer. I don't see how you could use it.
 
  #13  
Old 10-09-02, 10:44 AM
alizona
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Alex,
I have logged in and submitted 12 posts and only 8 have been posted on the site. Twice I have submitted an answer to your question and neither were posted. I am not waiting for the third strike. I have installed several thousand feet of siding that I used as flooring. Their are several things you need to keep track of or you will have problems. If you want the information I'll email it to you. Send the email address to [email protected]. You can save the money and have a beautiful floor but you have to do your homework.

alizona
 
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