Making my floor evenly uneven? HELP!

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-04-03, 12:03 AM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Making my floor evenly uneven? HELP!

Tricky to explain without a picture, but I'll try...

So, I'm installing a Manington laminate floor, and aproach a corner of the room, where one piece of plywood meets another...

Up until that point the floor was very slightly inclining to where the two pieces meet, and the piece it meets is perfectly level.

This has caused a "see-saw" effect on the board that crosses this sudden transition in gradients, making the piece that crossed over onto the level section of floor left hanging in mid air and obviously very bouncy as a result, and almost impossible to lock into the next row.

What's the best way to level this out, and make, what is a perfectly flat section of floor, match the slightly uneven remainder of floor?

It would seem to be a strange thing for me to level the whole floor perfectly just because of this one small section, which seems to measure roughly 12 inches wide, when the rest seems (lets hope so) to be evenly inclining with no other sudden changes.

There seems to be so many products for creating a perfectly level floor, but nothing that will help me keep the floor consistently uneven.

If I bridged the space on the far side of the level piece of board, so the laminate plank crosses it and sits on top of it, would the bridging effect cause the laminate to break, or would it perhaps be up to this short distance of bridging?

I heard metion of sand for certain aplications. would this be of any use to me?

Thanks in advance! I'm kind of stuck.

Rob Lawrence.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-04-03, 03:23 AM
Locy's Hardwood
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
If i am understanding you correctly you have two sheets of plywood that come to gether and one is higher than the other causeing a hump when the wide laminate is layed across the seam. If this is the case you can use a belt sander to knock down the higher spot. Azfred might be able to help you better we will see what he says

Phil
 
  #3  
Old 05-04-03, 04:49 AM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yes I think you've pictured it right...

Would belt sanding really work to leave such a small gradient decrease?
After all the far side still wouldn't be quite as high as required, even if the transition between the two pieces of plywood was taken away would it?

The other thing that puts me off about it, is the fact that theres so many old nails burried around the wood.
I nail punched them all down below the surface, but I'm not sure how much sanding it would accept.

Rob.
 
  #4  
Old 05-04-03, 04:56 AM
Locy's Hardwood
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
What you are trying to acheive is a slight slope. If you remove the excess wood to acheive this you should be fine. As far as the nails set them and sand a little then check to see if they need to be set again. Once you get the subfloor to where you need it you can add a couple of screws if you feel the nails won't hold the sub down.

Philly
 
  #5  
Old 05-04-03, 07:11 AM
AzFred
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Please don't confuse "level" with "flat! The sub floor must be FLAT. A belt sander works great. If a low "spot" is a problem, self leveling concret (SLC) will work.
 
  #6  
Old 05-04-03, 09:04 AM
floorman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
it sounds like what you have is a crown in one of the joists the easy fix is to take a belt sander to it and knock it down.If you want to get carried away with it you can cut out that pecice of ply and plane it down but the belt sander is the way to go
 
  #7  
Old 05-04-03, 01:35 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Well the problem is that, although sanding the initial bump transition from an incline to a flat surface would be gone, the far side of the flat piece of ply that the laminate would be crossing would still not be quite high enough for the plank to lay securely at the far side.

The rest of the floor IS a small incline, but it's enough that when this meets a flat surface, the far side will be lower than it would have been had the flat piece carried on the incline...no amount of sanding can make the edge higher so the plank can sit right.

Is their an easy way to fill this slope?

Rob.
 
  #8  
Old 05-04-03, 03:12 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
how about a non self leveling compound?

After giving it some thought...I think what I really need is some kind of compound that isn't self leveling...So I could lay a line of it onto the far edge of the flat ply and run a straight edge from the incline ply, thus giving me that perfect line I need to lay the planks onto.

Does any product like this exist?

Badically something with the consistency of spackle that would be strong enough to use underneath a floor.

Any thoughts?

Rob
 
  #9  
Old 05-04-03, 08:11 PM
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Canton Ohio
Posts: 1,397
Ardex feather finish will conform to your needs. If I understand, you want to make the slope of the uneven board continue over the flat board. This should work
 
  #10  
Old 05-04-03, 09:29 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
YES!
That's exactly what I mean...

Thanks Daniel. I'll pick some up tomorrow if I can find it.

Rob.
 
  #11  
Old 05-04-03, 11:24 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Oh, one more thing, Daniel...Is this product (or any equivilent) available at any large retailers?

I've had a look around online and can't see much mention of it.

Even the companies web site doesn't list resellers.

I'm in Southern CA

Thanks!

Rob.
 
  #12  
Old 05-05-03, 01:31 PM
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Canton Ohio
Posts: 1,397
you might be able to pick it up at Home Depot or Lowe's
 
  #13  
Old 05-05-03, 04:54 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
No luck at either...

I called the company and got some local merchants who vend their stuff...

Managed to find one that both sells to the public and stocks the compound in question...Just off now to buy some in fact.

Thanks again.

Rob.
 
  #14  
Old 05-06-03, 06:12 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,074
Not saying this is proper but while installing carpet in a home I saw a laminate installer use roofing felt. It looked like a map of mountains that shows elevation. The irregular circles, that get smaller and smaller.
 
  #15  
Old 05-06-03, 10:10 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I'm still having problems finding the compound, but what I intend to do when I get some is...

I've put a 4 foot long straight edge over the seam where the uneven floor meets the short section of flat ply...

I then slid under small pieces of hardboard to where it could move no furhter under the straight edge without suporting it...I then marked them with pencil to where they came to rest, and finaly glued them in place to the ply subfloor.

After this piece I took two piece depths of hardboard (where they would fit - Not all areas of the floor needed a second piece) and did the same...pushed them along and under the straight edge until they came to a natural stop, and glued them in place.

This has left me with something that gives a rather interesting little design of squares of wood where the floor slopes and straightens out.

The intention I had is to use these as a nice accurate guide when I get my flooring compound.
I can just dump it down and scrape my straight edge along my little guide squares of wood and hopefully this will leave a nice even floor.

If the squares swell when I put the compound down, I can just sand them flat.

Sounds like a similar idea to the roofing felt one.

Short of pulling up the end of the entire subfloor and raising the joists, I don't think I had many other options here.

Rob.
 
  #16  
Old 05-20-03, 08:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 68
Originally posted by Ortem
I'm still having problems finding the compound, but what I intend to do when I get some is...

I've put a 4 foot long straight edge over the seam where the uneven floor meets the short section of flat ply...

I then slid under small pieces of hardboard to where it could move no furhter under the straight edge without suporting it...I then marked them with pencil to where they came to rest, and finaly glued them in place to the ply subfloor.

After this piece I took two piece depths of hardboard (where they would fit - Not all areas of the floor needed a second piece) and did the same...pushed them along and under the straight edge until they came to a natural stop, and glued them in place.

This has left me with something that gives a rather interesting little design of squares of wood where the floor slopes and straightens out.

The intention I had is to use these as a nice accurate guide when I get my flooring compound.
I can just dump it down and scrape my straight edge along my little guide squares of wood and hopefully this will leave a nice even floor.

If the squares swell when I put the compound down, I can just sand them flat.

Sounds like a similar idea to the roofing felt one.

Short of pulling up the end of the entire subfloor and raising the joists, I don't think I had many other options here.

Rob.
I had a similar problem with my subfloor. I ended up renting a floor sander to take down the high spot, and then used Ardex feather edge to smooth out everything.

You can find a distributer of Ardex buy calling them. Go to their website to get their phone number.

http://www.ardex.com/intro.htm
 
  #17  
Old 05-20-03, 10:16 AM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yeah, I finaly got it worked out

My problem was that it wasn't even really a hump. It was a smooth slight incline follow by a perfectly level bit, meaning the boards on the far side of the level bit had perhaps a quarter of an inch of bounce to them...

I ended up doing as I said above, so the floor ended up nicely unlevel, but evenly so.

The feather finish is a superb product.

If this happens again in the next room adjacent, I've got a belt sander on it's way to me...

Should at least make sanding the ardex down a little easier.
(I only have a finishing sander ATM)

Rob.
 
  #18  
Old 05-20-03, 11:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 68
Re: Yeah, I finaly got it worked out

Originally posted by Ortem
My problem was that it wasn't even really a hump. It was a smooth slight incline follow by a perfectly level bit, meaning the boards on the far side of the level bit had perhaps a quarter of an inch of bounce to them...

I ended up doing as I said above, so the floor ended up nicely unlevel, but evenly so.

The feather finish is a superb product.

If this happens again in the next room adjacent, I've got a belt sander on it's way to me...

Should at least make sanding the ardex down a little easier.
(I only have a finishing sander ATM)

Rob.
I didn't have to sand the Ardex. I just was careful to spread it smoothly with a straight trowel.
 
  #19  
Old 05-20-03, 11:55 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 68
Another trick is to use long boards in the area. They do bend quite a bit.
 
  #20  
Old 05-20-03, 03:17 PM
Ortem
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Originally posted by dougmint
Another trick is to use long boards in the area. They do bend quite a bit.
The OTHER problem I had in this area was that the boards all ended at a massive sliding cabinet door, so any tiny amount of bounce or gap couldn't even be compensated for when the new baseboard goes in.

And Also the level and amount of ardex featherfinish the spaces needed varied enormously right across the entire width of the floor (a full quarter of an inch on the right hand side, compared to almost half in the middle) , so I was left, eventually using a piece of laminate to judge how much more was needed in some places, and less in others.

This coupled with my obvious inexperience...it just took forever.

I have noticed on scraps of laminate though that they do seem to conform to the shape they're lying on after a little while.

I imagine an amount of settling is going to happen either way.

Rob.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes