Best tools for laminate installation?


  #1  
Old 06-06-03, 11:27 AM
EWL
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Best tools for laminate installation?

I am planning to install laminate flooring soon but haven't got many tools beyond a drill and the very basics. With all the father's day sales on power tools, I am wondering what you would recommend as the "must haves" for this kind of job, and that hopefully would also be useful for other things later on?

I had already figured to rent a power jamb saw to do door mouldings, but otherwise should I go for a table saw? and/or a mitre saw? circular saw? jigsaw?

Appreciate any advice!
 
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Old 06-06-03, 05:42 PM
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A miter saw with a fine tooth blade is the one for flooring. However, depending on the floor panel width you might want a sliding miter or use a small table saw. Sort of depends.
For narrow stock the miter saw is good.

fred
 
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Old 06-06-03, 05:45 PM
AzFred
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Are we justifing tools for long term use? If so, a table saw is best for ripping the long side of planks. Reason to explain the table saw to your wife: To have a professional look to the finished floor the start side of the room and the finish side of the room should have planks of a similar width. This requires ripping each plank in the first and last row, usually.

For all of the "length" cuts and for angle cuts a chop saw or miter saw or a sliding miter saw is best. The sliding miter saw is the most expensive and investment will be a consideration here. Most pros use the sliding miter saw, explaination for the little lady: Most cuts will be end cuts (maybe miter cuts as well) and the saw will be great for making picture frames later. Moldings cut at a 45 are neater and the joints more difficult to see.

Finally, a fine tooth carbide blade, 40 or 60 tooth, will make the neatest cuts. A 60 tooth is best and you may wnat 2 because the wear of the blade will be rapid and a second blade will allow for continuing the installation while your first blade is out to the re-sharpening shop for renewal.

Tool On!!!!
 
  #4  
Old 06-09-03, 05:44 AM
EWL
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Thanks for the replies-- you hit it right on the head, AzFred!

Any recommendations for brands/models if I am looking for a decent table saw and mitre saw that will do the job well but not break the bank? (i.e., for someone on a budget who *hopes* to use these for other projects in the future, but realistically *might* not!) Would a "portable" bench-style table work? I've seen some advertised for pretty low prices...
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-03, 04:23 AM
Locy's Hardwood
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I have two craftsman miter saws 1 sliding one fixed. Both good machines. As far as the table saw i have a ryobi ( now retired and a delta both very effective and cost effective. Use dewalt or freud blades they work the best and are easily sharpened for longer life. Try to stay away from B&D, Skil, Benchtop etc. the cheapies. The price looks great but they lack in performance. In other words you don't want a yugo, and you don't want a cadilac. You want the family midsized. He he he

Phil
 
 

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