Self Leveling Concrete...should I use...


  #1  
Old 12-02-03, 08:03 AM
blocky97
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Self Leveling Concrete...should I use...

Quick question, using Perrys string technique that i saw in one of his posts which is by far WAY BETTER then using a leveler. Much more accurate with the string method!

So i'm using it to measure the gap between the high and low spots... there are certain areas that are right at 1/8th. I only had time to do a little bit this morning...but my question is. If when i check the whole floor, and find that there are parts that are 3/16th higher then it should be. Should i level it?

My next question is, because I have never leveled a concrete floor, I feel that if i do the 'bad areas' i might screw it up and make it to high...so I would like to use a self Leveling compound...such as an Ardex product. If i put a self leveling compound on the floor, will it find the 'low spots' automatically and fill them in, and on the high spots...just kind of..'roll down' to the low spots? i.e. would it be advantageous to use a self leveling compound anyways...even if only certain areas are 1/8th?

Finally at what type of store (or what store)would I find Ardex self leveling compounds? I saw at Home Depot, they have some kind of self leveling compound...but from what I have seen I think I should just use Ardex, and I don't remember who was the manf. of the one at home depot...but i'm pretty sure it wasn't Ardex?

thanks
 
  #2  
Old 12-02-03, 02:26 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ca
Posts: 756
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Re: Self Leveling Concrete...should I use...

Originally posted by blocky97
Quick question, using Perrys string technique that i saw in one of his posts which is by far WAY BETTER then using a leveler. Much more accurate with the string method!

It is not more accurate it is simply a different way to do it. Also keep in mind that the flatness spec is over a limited distance.

So i'm using it to measure the gap between the high and low spots... there are certain areas that are right at 1/8th. I only had time to do a little bit this morning...but my question is. If when i check the whole floor, and find that there are parts that are 3/16th higher then it should be. Should i level it?

Since 3/16 is greater than 1/8, you are out of spec. I don't understand why you are asking this question.

My next question is, because I have never leveled a concrete floor, I feel that if i do the 'bad areas' i might screw it up and make it to high...so I would like to use a self Leveling compound...such as an Ardex product. If i put a self leveling compound on the floor, will it find the 'low spots' automatically and fill them in, and on the high spots...just kind of..'roll down' to the low spots? i.e. would it be advantageous to use a self leveling compound anyways...even if only certain areas are 1/8th?

I think you are going to get in trouble thinking this way. First of all there is a big difference between "level" and "flat". I'm not sure you understand the difference. When you understand this your question will be answered. Here's a hint - purchase a screed set and it will be very difficult to make it too high. Again, the flatness requirement is over a limited distance, not the whole slab.

Finally at what type of store (or what store)would I find Ardex self leveling compounds? I saw at Home Depot, they have some kind of self leveling compound...but from what I have seen I think I should just use Ardex, and I don't remember who was the manf. of the one at home depot...but i'm pretty sure it wasn't Ardex?

The one I used from home depot claims to be self leveling for 10 mins but it's highly dependent on how much water you add. What you probably need is a patching compound that is approved for use from 1" thick to a feathered edge. Also, the websites for these products usually give detailed info on the use and application of their products. Always follow manufacturer recommendations because there is no turning back on this. If you screw it up...

thanks
 
  #3  
Old 12-02-03, 04:33 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ca
Posts: 756
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
And also, if you are doing a glue down, the glue manufacturer usually specifies which leveling product to use (their own of course). If you can find it, it may be best to stick with their rec so they can't wiggle out of the warranty should something go wrong. On the other hand, has anyone ever collected on a warranty for a wood floor of any kind?

I know that Bostick specifies a patching mortar, not a self leveling product.
 
  #4  
Old 12-02-03, 04:42 PM
florcraft
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I have rarely had a warranty issue with anything in 7 years, but it does happen. Nothing with wood though, but give em an inch and they will get out of a claim, and rightly so, they want to make sure the very best materials are used, or what they think is best.
use the wrong adhesive, and guaranteed warranty is toast.
 
  #5  
Old 12-02-03, 04:53 PM
blocky97
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
As far as adhesive, for the warrenty I have to use Bostick's best. For patching, ...portland based cement material...

So for leveling then...i would probablly have to go with bostiks...I'll have to do a good inspection of my floor tonight to see exactly if i have any real trouble spots....
 
  #6  
Old 12-02-03, 05:05 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ca
Posts: 756
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
It's not really as hard as it seems but you do need a screed of some sort. Also, I had some difficulty getting a feather edge, the cement didn't really want to spread that thin but it was still well within spec. Also put your primer on a much larger area than you think you really need because the patch grows as you screed it.

I didn't mix up a whole bag - I weighed a quarter bag on a scale and pro-rated the amount of water accordingly. The stuff does not give you all that long of a working time. Finally you may want to cover areas that do not need patching or you may get a lot of drips. The drips are scraped off easily but it's better to prevent in the first place.
 
  #7  
Old 12-05-03, 10:49 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ca
Posts: 756
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Hey Blocky,

I think I realized why you were not too keen on the level method. I did not intend that you use the bubble to find low spots. I meant to use the level as a straightedge - it works better than a piece of metal since you don't have to hold it. I should have said straightedge.
 
  #8  
Old 12-05-03, 01:48 PM
blocky97
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Alex,

Yea i figured that I should use it as just a straight edge. My subfloor actaully is in pretty good shape!

But i'm thinking about having a professional take a look at it just to make sure
 
  #9  
Old 12-05-03, 03:35 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Ca
Posts: 756
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
If you can get a pro to look at great. I tried and one guy told me he never flattens the slab! He said, I'm a hardwood floor installer, I don't work with cement. I think a lot of these guys are relying on the fact that the floor will look great for a few years and by then the consumer has no real recourse anyway.

This is why with a little patience and some research you can do a better job than many "pros".
 
  #10  
Old 12-05-03, 07:32 PM
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 5,073
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
3/16" isn't bad if it is over a big span. Say 10 foot.

Self leveling is not the product to use for spot leveling.

Ardex SD-F, screeded off the high spots with a long straight edge.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: