laminate floor installation - KITCHEN


  #1  
Old 02-16-04, 05:53 AM
PSU329
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laminate floor installation - KITCHEN

I am going to install Pergo Select glueless laminate floors in my kitchen. I plan on using a dolly to move the fridge and place the laminate to the wall there,

My question is installing the flooring around the cabinets and the island in the center of my kitchen; I plan on butting the flooring up to the cabinets (with the appropriate spacing to allow the floor to float), apply the baseboards to hold down the ends of the flooring and then use silacone caulking to ensure a waterproof seal between the bottom of the baseboards and the flooring, is there anything else that I should be concerned about?

Thanks in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 02-17-04, 02:30 PM
florcraft
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Using the right cleaner, that's it.
 
  #3  
Old 02-17-04, 02:47 PM
asennad
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Ikea makes an excellent laminate flooring that is much cheaper than Pergo.
 
  #4  
Old 02-17-04, 03:18 PM
AzFred
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Pergo MAKES laminate flooring, Ikea does NOT. The cheaper glue together floors are cheaper for a reason.
 
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Old 02-17-04, 04:22 PM
florcraft
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Azfred right again!
 
  #6  
Old 02-17-04, 07:36 PM
asennad
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Originally posted by AzFred
Pergo MAKES laminate flooring, Ikea does NOT. The cheaper glue together floors are cheaper for a reason.
So who makes the flooring that Ikea sells? And it's not glue together it's a snap like Pergo. They changed it over a year ago.
 
  #7  
Old 02-17-04, 09:15 PM
AzFred
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A "snap" like Pergo or a "clic" like Pergo? There is a significat difference and Pergo offers both although the better one is a "private label" product and sold by only one retailer.

IKEA buys from a low bidder and you're correct, they changed vendors again and again, and once more and, get the idea?
 
  #8  
Old 02-17-04, 10:28 PM
asennad
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I can only go my own experience but I have found the Ikea product quite acceptable. I used the glue together kind the only type available at the time - and did the work myself having to rent a Pergo installation kit. I would not recommend any glue together type. APITA.

Shortly after I laid my flooring they discounted the remaining stock. I got a refund for the difference so paid something like $0.80 sq foot. The floor has held up much better than I ever expected.

Ikea then changed to the interlocking type, and I have some samples of it, which holds together well, and looks good. However I would probably use carpenters glue to install it anyway.

That being said I consider all laminate flooring as inexpensive flooring and do not consider it a product I would use for a lifetime installation. As I can get unstained hardwood for $3 a square foot why would I want to spend anymore more than $1.19 for laminate?

I have kept an eye on laminate since I installed my floor and have seen the Home Depot, Lowes and Pergo variety. I do not think the higher price the other flooring sells for to be justified.
 
  #9  
Old 02-18-04, 01:45 AM
T
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Laminate installation

You need to do some research to learn who the major laminate manufacturers are. Retailers of major manufacturers will have displays of good, better, and best qualitities offered. As you move up in quality and warranty, prices tend to increase. Purchasing floor covering products from a retailer whose major specialty is not floor covering and getting sucked in by price points withput adequate research of the flooring product tends not to be the way to go. Back up, take a deep breath, and do your research. IKEA is not a manufacturer or wholesaler of flooring producrts. My guess is that they tend to offer watever they can at the best price to maintain relatiionshps between their supplier, their retail store, and customers.

Each individual laminate manufacturer offers its own installation instructions. It is extremely important that you follow these regarding acclimation (adjustment to temp and humidity in the home, layout), etc. Following instructions is important when it comes to meeting warranty guidelines. If in doubt re: installation and warranties, please contact dealer direct.
 
  #10  
Old 02-18-04, 05:57 AM
AzFred
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Give very careful consideration to the application of glue to a glueless floor joint. Some are machined so close that there is no space left for a glue line. The Uniclic design is one such joint. The hydraulic pressure of assembly can damage the plank and the glue can force moisture intrusion into the substrate. The glue won't adhere very well if the plank has been treated with a wax coating either as most of the better brands are. The wax is visible as a darker color on the machined edge usually.

Proper glue for most wood and wood products used for flooring is a PVA type II in North America or in Europe a D-3. Most carpenters wood glue is not type II and dosen't afford the same qualities of moisture and heat resistance. There I go again, pointing out that there is a difference in quality and yes the carpenters wood glue is generally somewhat less expensive.
 
 

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