engineered wood flooring advice sought


  #1  
Old 10-01-04, 05:48 AM
gretchen dean
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engineered wood flooring advice sought

hi. anyone know where i can find 5" or so wide, prefinished, light or white-stained engineered "white ash" plank flooring?

and a source for an unfinished wood threshold to go from my tiled foyer, down about 3/4", to engineered flooring i plan to put in the greatroom? the threshold would be sitting on a 2" wide strip of exposed backerboard (where i'll be taking out the cultured marble threshold presently there) and then transitioning over to sit on top of the first board in the wood flooring.

also, anyone had experience with - or have convictions about - solid vs. engineered flooring in areas that might get wet? i have four sliding patio doors in the area i plan wood flooring for and, in the past, there has been leaking. i'm putting silicone where the leaks seem to have been and will test with a hose but in case the silicone pulls away in the future, which - solid 3/4" or 3 ply (or 5?) engineered will hold up better? does engineered delaminate when it gets a little wet? or is the glue between the three layers - say ash on top of perpendicular spruce on top of parallel softwood of some sort - less likely to pull away from the wood than the wood is to disintegrate?

thanks for any input. i'm afraid engineered products haven't been in use long enough to know if they live up to their 15 or 25 year waranties. or have some of them?
 
  #2  
Old 10-01-04, 05:11 PM
florcraft
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Engineered wood is more stable than solid due to construction, but both can get ruined just as bad with wetness.

Kahrs hardwood is my fav....
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-04, 06:08 AM
gretchen dean
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when the frost bites ...

kahrs, hum-m-m. thanks for thinking to mention that - and the information on engineered's "dimensional stability". i checked out kahrs's website and see some beauties. have you worked with boen's products? they do have a 5" white ash plank (which is my first choice size/species, presently) and kahr doesn't do ash.

speaking of white ash, i found a photo of you (?) hard at home-improving your 'gloo: http://arneberg.com/home/igloo/html/icebox3.html. if engineered works in that, it'll be fine in my little, north carolina 'sandbox'.
 
  #4  
Old 10-02-04, 02:35 PM
florcraft
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I know not of Boen's products.
An engineered wood is like a plywood, so dimensionally it is very stable.
When you make an engineered wood, you can use a lathe or slice cut it. Kahrs slice cuts their wood, so the grain is defined better. Plus their u.v. cured acrylic eurethane is tough and enhances the grain even more.

good luck


by the way, that was igloo # 24 a couple blocks down....
 
  #5  
Old 10-05-04, 07:30 AM
H
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"white-stained engineered "white ash" plank flooring?"

Are you sure you want white? Shows every flaw known to man
 
  #6  
Old 10-05-04, 03:27 PM
A
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I knew a contractor that did a job for someone where he bleached the wood to get it as white as possible. A few weeks later the customer called him back to redo it with stain at great expense. The owner just could not keep it clean no matter how hard they tried!

Also, why are your sliding glass doors "leaking". Are they underwater? If rain is being blown against them then I would consider some type of awning because eventually it will affect the wood.
 
  #7  
Old 10-06-04, 04:52 AM
gretchen dean
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giving up on pickled ash

ken, thanks for your input. boen makes an "ash polar" (-stained, white ash-) engineered, floor. my potential installer's boss dropped a good sized sample by the other day; another flooring contractor came over that afternoon, pointed at the sample and said, "you don't want that! it'll show everything." what i didn't "get" was he meant "every flaw known to man." especially, perhaps, every flaw of the installer. and, then, wear patterns and dents, etc. incurred in the course of use by the homeowners. i thought he meant dirt, as in the common phrase, "white shows everything!" - applied, usually, to clothes ... or, (my) cars.

i'd already sort of decided against the "ash polar", partly because it only comes in strip (-not in plank-) but primarily because the high, heartwood/sapwod contrast of natural ash is immensely muted by the white stain. i guess the stain - understandably - lightens the heartwood more than the sapwood, thus lessening the contrast between the two. i'd like some sort of wood-lightened treatment that would make just the sapwood of the ash more white (-less yellow). i may go with boen's "ash nature" (-"nature", here, refers to a grade lower than "ash select" - not available in plank - equivalent, i guess, to a nofma's, "common#1 and better".

i may instead decide on an excellent (-if my assessment of, and samples are indicative-) product from sheoga - a 3/4" solid, fas (- or, principally-) grade, 5-1/4" natural ash plank.
 
  #8  
Old 10-06-04, 05:20 AM
gretchen dean
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"wood and water ..."

thank you alex for replying to the post. i suspect white wood is more challenging to keep clean than white ceramic. i lived with white ceramic i'd had installed in my last place for seven years and i was so content with it. but then i live a quiet, single life with no pets - and am farsighted so i don't see the dirt much. i put ceramic - white, again - in this home and i love it but, as i gave up on white cars, maybe 1248 square feet of white flooring here would prove a bit too much of a cleaning chore. anyway, i've decided i don't like the look of the white-stained ash and i can't help but assume an on-site lye or bleach treatment would mute the sapwood/heartwood contrast i love about ash, as much as in the prefinished, engineered sample i have.

the flooring contractor who came the other day said sliding patio doors are notorious for leaking. they leak in the corners where the aluminum sill/butts against the vertical, steel frames. there are no gutters on these townhomes - for some good reason i was told but have forgotten, maybe because we're in the nc sandhills. rain bounces off the deck (which wraps around all four patio doors) and up against the doors - and siding.

i'm awaiting the original, installation instructions - and a trouble-shooting guide - from peachtree, showing exactly where, and how frequently, to - silicone-seal the doors. i'll do that and then intensively hose down the doors, and if there is no leaking, i'll feel it's o.k. to put in a wood floor - or, at least, an engineered wood floor.
 
  #9  
Old 10-06-04, 07:36 AM
gretchen dean
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engineered wood quality

to the resident at igloo #3 (florcraft), re: "... you can use a lathe or slice cut it. Kahr's slice cuts their wood, so the grain is defined better. Plus their u.v. cured acrylic eurethane is tough and enhances the grain even more."

i was wrong: kahr's does have ash though not an ash plank. their site is grand and their technical information, wonderfully detailed [http://www.kahrs.com/feat.html]. there's no dealer near me - or none listed on the site.

i came across this on the columbia forest products site, "ANSI/HPVA defines veneer as "a thin sheet of wood, rotary cut, sliced, or sawed from a log, bolt or flitch." a mirage - boa-franc's engineered flooring - brochure discusses their "dry sawn" [www.miragefloors.com/en/ pdf/en_mirage-engineered-brochure.pdf] face. and lauzon also has a "dry sawn" face [http://www.lauzonltd.com/products/authentic.html]. i gather the wood in the rotary-cut method is cut wet.

it's interesting, the numerous variations on the engineered flooring theme (-"high-end" plywood, it is described as on one site). some have hardwood throughout, others; hard top and bottom, coniferous core; others hard face, coniferous core and bottom. i need to research why, or whether, one's preferable to another. i'd think the thickness of the face - and the whole board would be more important. then the quality of the wood, glue, milling, etc.
 
 

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