Can I Stain After I poly???


  #1  
Old 10-13-04, 09:06 PM
danhill123
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Can I Stain After I poly???

I recently pulled carpet up in one of my rooms. After pulling the carpet I sanded the floor down and then added 2 coats of water based poly thinking the floor would darken several shades to match my other floors. The sanded/polyed floor is still natural color and my other floors are a golden pecan color...

I am not looking to match my other floors just give them a little color that is close to my other floors, do I need to sand the entire floor down again before I try to add some stain.

I have heard that it is difficult to get an even stain on a floor, any suggestions of steps of application and/or what is the best way to apply?

Thanking you in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 10-15-04, 05:45 PM
BobsRemodeling
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When using a water-based floor finish, the end color is always lighter when it dries. I am assuming your floors are oak. An oil based poly could have been used in which would have gave you a more desired color match to your exsisting floors color. I would reccomend resanding if you need to match the other flooring color, tinting or staining on top of a finish is not reccomended.
If you do decide to resand, you can do a test spot with the oil based poly and compare colors to see if you need to stain or not to match the other floor color.

Bob
 
  #3  
Old 10-16-04, 01:39 PM
T
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Staining wood floors

Stain is applied to raw wood. It is wiped on and off. Polyurethane seals wood to protect it. Stain can not penetrate polyurethane finish. To change the color of wood will require your sanding down to raw wood, staining, then finishing.
 
  #4  
Old 10-29-04, 12:17 AM
MNGopher29
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I have to disagree with some of the information listed here. The stain is actually the sealer that seals the wood. The Poly, whether it is water or oil-based is the protective layer. As far as your wood color, both are right in that you would have to sand your surface in order to change the color at this point. Once you have done that and have gotten back down to wood grain, sealing it within 24 hours is crucial so that the grain doesn't rise and you would need to sand again. Once you find the color that you desire, keep this in mind, water-based polys will leave the floor its natural color. Oil-based polys will yellow the look of the floor once it has dried.
 
 

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