Laminate in unheated cottage in cold Canada

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  #1  
Old 10-22-04, 12:26 PM
Cottage Girl
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Red face Laminate in unheated cottage in cold Canada

I'm getting mixed messages from flooring companies. Can anyone tell me if they've installed laminate flooring in a cottage that is not used in the winter months. Our cottage will be unheated and it can get really cold in Canada during the winter months. Any suggestions ? Thanks so much
 
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Old 10-22-04, 12:36 PM
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Laminate in unheated cottage

The proper performance of any floor covering requires that temperature and humidity be maintained year round at normal occupancy levels. That is about 70 degrees and 35-55% humidity. This is because extreme fluctuations of temperature and humidity cause floor coverings to expand and contract. Frost proof quarry tile can handle freezing temperatures and might be a good option for an unheated cottage in winter. It should be installed over concrete underlayment with wood subfloor or directly to concrete subfloor.
 
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Old 10-22-04, 06:11 PM
florcraft
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Check out Armstrong's laminates for life. Read the details and call if you have to for warranty info.
It is the only manufacturer who accepts it's use in unheated houses in Alaska.
 
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Old 10-23-04, 07:23 AM
Cottage Girl
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still confused

A trip to HOme Depot last night just added to the confusion. We were told by the flooring manager that laminate would be fine, but hardwood is a definite NO. I phoned "Pergo Warranty info" and they said provided it was aclimatized before installation (at 60 degrees), it should work. Mannington says use it only in comfort controlled situations. Ideally, if someone out there has actually put laminiate in a non-winterized dwelling, I would love to know your result. [/
 

Last edited by Cottage Girl; 10-23-04 at 07:24 AM. Reason: color change
  #5  
Old 10-23-04, 09:09 AM
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Laminate installation

Armstrong's Laminate for Life was a product line that was exclusive to Carpet One stores. I believe it has been discontinued.

According to the National Association of Laminate Flooring Manufacturers: Laminates need to be installed in climatically stable environments, avoiding extreme temperature swings and excessive humidity.

http://www.nalfa.com/FAQlaminate.htm
 
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Old 10-25-04, 04:00 AM
Cottage Girl
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thank you

Thanks for the information. We've decided to put off floor covering installation until the Springtime so we'll have lots of time to do more research. Perhaps a new product will hit the market this winter and solve all our problems. (If cost were not a factor, I'd love to put down wide pine planks but haven't won the lottery yet!)
 
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Old 10-25-04, 02:12 PM
florcraft
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Originally Posted by twelvepole
Armstrong's Laminate for Life was a product line that was exclusive to Carpet One stores. I believe it has been discontinued.
Your right, they have changed their line a bit, but a recent discussion with my rep confirms that Armstrongs mid to higher end in their line is acceptable for unheated homes up here in Bush Alaska.
 
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Old 10-26-04, 06:13 PM
Cottage Girl
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Thumbs up

If it's good enough for Alaska, it's good enough for Eastern Canada !! Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-01-04, 06:25 PM
Cottage Girl
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now considering pine

After making a few "budgetary adjustments", I'm now considering a combination of pine floor and carpeting in new cottage. Any negative comment on using a soft wood such as pine ??
 
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Old 11-01-04, 07:39 PM
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Floor covering in unheated cottage

All floor coverings tend to require year round maintenance of temperture and humifity due to thermal expansion and contraction. Flooring tends to contract when cold and expand when warm. Extremes of temperature differential can be detrimental to floor covering. The only floor covering that tends no to respond to these variations is frost proof tile.
 
  #11  
Old 11-11-08, 12:17 AM
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Same situation

Hi -

This thread is four years old, but I'm hoping Cottage Girl can give me an update on the installation of flooring in her cottage. We are facing the same situation: we're building a summer "cottage" on Lake Ontario in northern New York. It can get well below zero at times and we're concerned about what it can do to flooring. I'd really prefer to stay away from carpet as much as possible since it is right on the lake and the carpet we had in the old place was badly in need of replacing before we tore the whole place down.

Does anyone have an update on this thread?

Thanks!
 
  #12  
Old 04-18-12, 10:52 AM
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I have a 1920's lakeside cabin in Northern Ontario. We do not have heat in the winter nor A/C in the summer so the place experiences all sorts of weather and temp extremes.

The majority of the cabin has a stained wood floor and it's fine. We have had to replace some spongy boards near a front door that had suffered water damage at some point (it is close to 100 after all) but aside from that there is nothing special that needs doing. We have area rugs (wool persians, kilims and a pony hide) that we leave down all year, moving occasionally to sweep and mop. No problems yet.

The bathroom has a one piece vinyl floor that we are replacing this year with cork for esthetic purposes only. No problems with the vinyl flooring whatsoever.

The place used to have linoleum in the bedrooms which was removed to show the original wood floors. There was no problems with the linoleum in the heat and cold either, it was just ugly.

We have no insulation under the floor (perhaps we will spray some in this fall) the cottage is up on piers with the underside open to the out of doors. It's been like this since 1920. Cold in the winter and hot in the humid heat of an Ontario Summer.

Hope that helps you out some with deciding on what to use in your own cabins. It's not such a big concern as everyone makes it out to be.

FYI to the person who was worried about the plumbing in an unheated place. Hardy 3 season cottagers drain the plumbing every season's end and replace water in toilet tanks and traps with antifreeze. You only make the mistake of doing it wrong once, ha.
 
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