Installing laminate floors over concrete

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Old 01-11-05, 08:14 PM
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Question Installing laminate floors over concrete

I have a slab on grade floor with an existing vinyl tile installed on it.
I would like to install a floating laminate wood floor on top of this.

I have been planning to lay down a vapour barrier, then 3/4" plywood, felt, then the wood laminate. Is this the best and/or correct method? I don't have the luxury of adding sleepers under the plywood first.

The floor right now is extremely cold in the winter so I'd like to make the floor warmer.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-12-05, 09:18 AM
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That will work just fine. I have used both osb and plywood and had good results with both. Both are priced high right now so I would just pick the less expensive. I have even used 1/2" and it works just fine too. There is also a product called DRIcore that is good but a little expensive but it combines a vapor barrior and the wood together. I think it is www.dricore.com It is very easy to install since it is in smaller pieces.
Have fun.
Bryan
 
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Old 01-12-05, 07:32 PM
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I too am about to embark on a first time laminate flooring DIY install - this is in a condo in a high-rise building that is almost 100 years old - the floors for whatever reason are not exactly level...

My brother in law suggested we put some kind of a board down before we install the padding and flooring - does this sound familiar to anyone? Any sites that you can point me to with info about this?

Any input is appreciated!

Thx,
The Wink
 
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Old 01-12-05, 08:21 PM
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"wood laminate"

Are you talking about a laminate plank with a picture of wood inprinted on it?
Or are you talking about a cross-ply engineered hardwood?

With either, I wouldn't recommend a plywood subfloor over concrete. You may be asking for more trouble.

How are you going to secure the plywood? What kind of moisture barrier are you thinking about using?
 
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Old 01-12-05, 08:26 PM
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Thanks for the reply - yes, laminate planks w/ picture of wood.

Moisture barrier is the other hurdle to figure out... what is appropriate?

On the board issue, we hadn't decided if it is necessary or not yet -- I'm doing several rooms but only one has an issue with the sloping floor -- I don't like the idea of raising the flooring up in that room higher and to have it be uneven with the other rooms and hallway leading into it.
 
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Old 01-13-05, 09:38 AM
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Perry, yes the "wood laminate" I referred to is the inexpensive laminate floors, it's actually a 1/2" thick laminate. I was going to put down a plastic poly down first, then use a hilti gun to secure the plywood. On top of the plywood would be building paper, on top of all this would be the typical foam that goes under the laminate floor and finally the floor itself.
 
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Old 01-13-05, 06:24 PM
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What is the purpose of the plastic poly, if your going to puncture it all over with a Hilti?

Why not float the tile with ARDEX SD-F, and then lay your poly, making sure to seal the seams, or tears. Then your foam cushion underlayment(or you could use the 3-n-1 cushion barriers in one)

Then install your planks, making sure you undercut all doorjambs.
 
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Old 01-17-05, 04:24 PM
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I ended up using the DRIcore product. It is a bit more expensive at $1.55 a square foot, but when you add up the cost of plywood (at $1 a square foot) plus the rental of a hilti gun, etc, it works out to be about the same. It was very easy to install and the temperature difference was noticeable right away. Next step is getting a decent foam underlayment and some laminte....
 
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Old 01-17-05, 08:18 PM
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I still don't understand why you needed the plywood subfloor?

Why spend the extra expense and add the extraheight to the floor, when it wasn't really needed?
 
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Old 01-18-05, 10:56 AM
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The main purpose of the plywood subfloor was to create an insulated area above the conc slab. My main concern over the installation was the fact that the floor was incredibly cold, and since I live in a damp environment (Vancouver, BC) the floor was unbearable to walk or stand on for a long period of time.

Most of my neighbours have installed tile, cork, and laminate right on the slab, why I'm not sure, but their floors are still very cold. The raised plywood subfloor creates a nice air space above the slab and has increased the temperature of the floor nicely. After looking at lots of options, and I did investigate the options that everyone mentioned (thanks for that!), I discovered that the best option for my installation was the raised subfloor.

Now my wife wants to do hardwood in another area of the house, also slab on grade. That will lead to another posting I'm sure.
 
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