Sanding/Re-Finishing an old floor

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  #1  
Old 01-13-05, 12:48 PM
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Question Sanding/Re-Finishing an old wood floor

Hi,

we bought an older house recently with my wife and now "we" want to rip off the carpet and re-finish the old wood floor that there is. I am not sure how bad of a condition the floor can be that it is still possible to safe it. The wood seems to have some glue/mat from the previous carpet on it and it looks pretty bad, but the wood itself seems to be in good condition underneath.

Any advice is appreciated...

Thanks in advance,

Juha
 

Last edited by Tribes; 01-13-05 at 04:43 PM.
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  #2  
Old 01-13-05, 06:26 PM
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Blood, sweat & tears, with a little cursing involved, and you'll be fine.


Get after it with the sander.
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-05, 07:19 PM
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I am all for DIY but before you go at it try getting a few bids on a sand and recoat. I have gone to fix a lot of floors because people didn't quite know what they were doing and didn't do a good job. I have also seen a lot of floors were a good job was done. Make sure you know what is involved before you try it yourself. I don't want to discourage DIY but you might find it isn't too expensive to have it done professionally. Good luck. If you want to go at it yourself let us know and we can walk you through it.
Have fun
Bryan
 
  #4  
Old 01-14-05, 05:23 AM
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Thanks for the advices.

I think I will have to go for it by my-self. I do not have the money to go for professionals and I am pretty confident about the hole thing. I have been reading different sites and trying to get a hang how to approach this.

Is a drum sander the right tool to go with? I think I will go rent it today in couple of hours, so we will see how it goes...
 
  #5  
Old 01-14-05, 06:35 AM
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You might want to hold off on renting it. As with any major project the more prep work you do the better the outcome.

Some things that should be done that haven't mentioned...
Remove basboards
Take up all the old carpet and tack strips.
Fix any squeeks or loose boards
Sink any nails that will be hit by the sander
Fill holes and nailheads
Try to get off as much glue as possible. (keeps the sandpaper from getting gummed up)

When you rent the sander you'll also need to rent a sanding edger to get into where the drum sander can't get.

I'm sure there is other stuff that people will add.
 
  #6  
Old 01-14-05, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Tribes

Is a drum sander the right tool to go with? I think I will go rent it today in couple of hours, so we will see how it goes...




This is going to be a good thread.


Really
 
  #7  
Old 01-14-05, 11:07 AM
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Thanks for the advice Merlin...

I was going to do all the preparations before I will go rent the sander
However, there are at least 1 million staples (maybe a little bit less, but you get the picture) in the floor that I am ripping of as we speak...so the renting has to wait for couple more hours or so, who knows???

I think I am lucky enough that there are not any squeeky boards so I do not have to spend time on that.

Hmmm...I have still a little bit of padding (hopefully it is even close to the right word) to rip of so I will see how the floor looks like...I am not sure what to use for the fill the holes if there is going to be some and what you would suggest to use for removing the glue?

Thanks for the input and keep on giving me some more I think I need it
 
  #8  
Old 01-14-05, 02:58 PM
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There are a number of ways to remove the glue. The one I've seen the mose and probably the better idea is to use a heat gun to get the glue tacky and the srcape it off with a putty knife being careful not to scorch and gouge the wood.

I know there are other people that will post helpful advice thie evening.
 
  #9  
Old 01-14-05, 07:38 PM
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If anyone is interested in looking on some of the pictures that I have taken from the project, be my guest...

http://community.webshots.com/user/pahkaju

Hmmm...I hope that it is allowed to post sites?? If not I am sorry...
 
  #10  
Old 01-14-05, 08:14 PM
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That glue will laugh at a heat gun as you smear it.

Looks like cutback adhesive, although it could be really grungy latex.
 
  #11  
Old 01-15-05, 01:07 PM
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That glue on there doesn't look too good. You will just have to sand it off. The heat gun won't touch it and a scraper will just do too much damage. Be sure to buy extra belts because you will need them. Merlin gave you a good list and you will need/need to do everything he mentioned. You will need a filler for all those staple holes and nail holes. You want a "trowelable wood filler" the place you rent the sander from should have the filler you need. You will want to trowel it over the entire floor before sanding, except where the glue is. That area you will want to hit with the sander first. Don't forget the edger, you'll need it.
You may not be able to get the area with glue to look the same as the other part of the floor. If the finish was in good shape before the glue was applied you shouldn't have too much problem. The glues have a tendancy to discolor the wood and it doesn't come out. Good luck and have fun. Sanding is one of my favorite parts, I love to make some thing old look new. You'll find it too be very rewarding.
Bryan
 
  #12  
Old 01-15-05, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by duneslider
You will just have to sand it off.








Uhh, black cutback adhesive.

Do you really want the dust from that, floating throughout the house.

You better have an outside dust collector, and a good one at that.
 
  #13  
Old 01-16-05, 06:53 PM
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Thanks for the inputs...due to some school stuff the sanding had to wait for couple more days, but at least I have had enough time for the preparations. Getting rid of that black studd was not that difficult, it took lots of time and some patience and now it is pretty much gone. The floor underneath seems to be in a quite good condition

Now I am fighting on getting those old nails off the floor, there are lots of in the connection part where the floor changes from better to worse and the are quite old/rusty. I am still trying to get the right tool for getting rid of those nails...
 
  #14  
Old 01-18-05, 01:20 AM
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I have removed staples and nails from hardwood floors with my Channel Grips. You might want to invest in a pair of knee pads.

For refinishing instructions for hardwood floors go to the National Oak Flooring Manufacturer's website at www.nofma.org
 
  #15  
Old 01-21-05, 12:34 PM
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Help needed again...

Now I have finished the part of the floor which was in worse condition. I have sanded the other side, the one that had a finish on couple times and it seems that it is not going anywhere...Is the Orbital sander really this slow (I have been sanding the floor for almost full 24 hours without sleep)??
 
  #16  
Old 01-21-05, 02:08 PM
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Does your sanding disc/pad/screen have any grit left on it?
 
  #17  
Old 01-21-05, 06:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Tribes
Is the Orbital sander really this slow (I have been sanding the floor for almost full 24 hours without sleep)??


LOL!!!



That is why professionals that depend on production to make a living, laugh at those DIY sanders.

Break out the Hummel, and be done with it.


I had a lady sand her 400 sq.ft. floor for 2 weeks straight, only to call me, and I sent my guys in, and they cut the floor, in 4 hours and had it ready for the first sealer coat of finish. It cost her way less then the rental on the bogus sander, she had rented for 2 weeks.
 
  #18  
Old 01-22-05, 08:00 AM
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I did try 20grit paper and it did not do anything for the old finish...should I use wood stripper for it before I rent something again or are there any other options?
 
  #19  
Old 01-22-05, 04:51 PM
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If you never plan on refinishing it, then the stripper will work.

If you plan on applying a finish, the stripper will cause all kinds of problems for the new finish. But if you feel lucky, go for it.


Go buy or rent a big commercial belt sander just made for wood floors. You will need an edge sander(edger) to get the places the big machine won't reach. Then pray you get a machine that hasn't been abused!!!

Your going to need a very good vacuum, because dust and particles are not pretty in the finish.
 
  #20  
Old 02-11-05, 01:01 PM
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Finally...with lots of sweat and couple sleepless nights (weeks) later my floors are ready for the staining

Thanks for all the input and advice from you all

I have also updated some more pictures and will be posting more as the staining process is going on.

Thanks,

Juha
 
  #21  
Old 02-12-05, 06:07 AM
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Forgot to ask if you had that old black adhesive tested?

You do realise that by sanding that black adhesive residue, you have contaminated your home entire with asbestos dust!!! I hope you had one hell of a dust collector going while you were sanding.

Coughing up blood clots in about 20 years should be about right.
 
  #22  
Old 02-12-05, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright




Uhh, black cutback adhesive.

Do you really want the dust from that, floating throughout the house.

You better have an outside dust collector, and a good one at that.

Remember this post of mine? Scroll up, you'll see it.
Black cutback adhesive is known to be laced with asbestos.
The glue it self is not hazardous, it is the fine particles that kill you... eventually from scar tissue in the lungs.
 
  #23  
Old 02-13-05, 11:48 AM
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He's right about asbestos potential..

Carpets Done Wright is right about asbestos potential... We've been going through issues in our house and have been told by many asbestos people that adhesives such as "cut-back" adhesive often contain asbestos. If you've already sanded it I reccomend that you take the $500.00 you could have paid someone to do the sanding job and spend it (maybe more $$) on TEM asbestos air sampling. That is, if you value your families health.

Sorry for more possible bad news.
 
  #24  
Old 02-14-05, 07:51 AM
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Thanks for the input.

The black stuff did not contain asbestos and I assume it was from the previous pad between the wood and carpet. It was put on in the early 1990s and I quess they did not use asbestos anymore at that time?

Now the finish is starting to look nice and I have now 2 coats of finish on it. However, there are couple places that have some wrinkles (not sure if that is the right word), should I hand sand them with extra fine sand paper before the final? third coat of finish?
 
  #25  
Old 02-15-05, 06:24 AM
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Your right, I must have missed the pictures or forgot what they looked like.

Picture 2, the close up...
I see latex masic, over what looks like rubberback carpet residue, or
they sanded the cutback on a cupped floor, then spread their mastic.

If it were full spread cutback without being sanded previously, it would be all black. The way it looks, it shows that the floor is, or was cupped before they installed it.
 
  #26  
Old 02-19-05, 07:03 PM
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Thanks for this thread!!!
I was planning on refinishing my kitchen floor that had rubber tiles glued on it from the 50s. It had the same adhesive in your pictures. I read the forum to get some tips on prep work, and then go rent the sander. I saw the post on the black adhesive and stopped. I am almost 100 percent sure that it contains asbestoes. Changed my mind, Pergo is going down. Thanks for the thread and the pictures from the web page.
Buzz
 
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