How do I fix my Pergo floors

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  #1  
Old 09-28-05, 01:52 AM
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Question How do I fix my Pergo floors

Could anybody suggest how can I repair a gap in my Pergo floors? I removed a built-in bar wich left me with an L-shaped (the short side is 17" x 29" and the long is 10"x30") gap in the floor. It seems that the tongue & grove planks were glued together, they are floating on concrete subfloor, with the appropriate waterproof material in between (the floor was professionally installed). Is it possible, at all, to repair/fill in the gap? The planks should be staggered to avoid a long seam line, but since they are glued together it's impossible to pull them apart without damaging them. Any ideas? Thank you
 
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Old 09-28-05, 07:52 AM
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Sure they can be repaired. The hard part is going to be finding the replacement planks needed. How long ago was this flooring installed?
 
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Old 09-28-05, 11:08 AM
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Pergo floor dilemma

Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright
Sure they can be repaired. The hard part is going to be finding the replacement planks needed. How long ago was this flooring installed?
Luckilly, I do have the replacement planks. The flooring was installed in Dec. 1997. I went back to the store to ask for an installer - I was told it's too small of a job for them to bother. My million dollar question is: so, how do I repair it?
 
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Old 09-28-05, 04:43 PM
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Too small of a job for them to make money off their subcontracted installers, is what it is.

Ask the installer directly, and I bet he jumps on it. These guys are not employees of the store. they are their own contracting businesses, just subcontracting work from the retail flooring dealer, who treat the subcontract crews as if they were actually employeed by them. It's a bad situation to be a subcontract crew for a flooring dealer, where the dealer is bidding their labor at cut rate pricing. The subcontractors are not educated in how to run a legit business, and the dealers take full advantage of it.
 
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Old 09-28-05, 06:58 PM
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Thumbs down The Pergo repair horror

Originally Posted by Carpets Done Wright
Too small of a job for them to make money off their subcontracted installers, is what it is.

Ask the installer directly, and I bet he jumps on it. These guys are not employees of the store. they are their own contracting businesses, just subcontracting work from the retail flooring dealer, who treat the subcontract crews as if they were actually employeed by them. It's a bad situation to be a subcontract crew for a flooring dealer, where the dealer is bidding their labor at cut rate pricing. The subcontractors are not educated in how to run a legit business, and the dealers take full advantage of it.
Thanks for the sound advice, but it leads me nowhere. I have no idea who their subcontractors are (after almost 8 years), I was told they're out all day on job sites; the store didn't give me names, took my phone number, said will ask their handyman. It was a 10 days ago - he still didn't call me. Also said that it might not be worth repairing it, would be cheaper to install a whole new flooring! (my dining room is about 400 sq. ft.) What's your opinion about that?!
 
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Old 09-28-05, 09:14 PM
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They make their money on sales and the labor of someone else to install it.

There has to be someone listed in your phonebook under flooring or hardwoods that is listed as an installation specialist or repair and correction specialist. There is here, and i'm not the only one listed.

No job is too small. I bid it to pay for my time.
 
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Old 10-01-05, 01:06 PM
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Still the Pargo floor dilemma

Yeah, Perry, thanks, but I thought it was a forum for doityourself-ers. Sorry, I can't hire you -- I live in sunny Los Angeles.
I guess, no one has encountered this problem, thus no DIY help on this.
 
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Old 10-03-05, 11:24 AM
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Cut the boards out, wiggle and pry out the glued in pieces left. Clean out the grooves with a skimmer(Magnum Tools) or router. Cut the bottom off the groove side of the replacement and part of the tounge to let you get that angle to install it. Dry fit the plank and you will need suction cups to get it back out to go ahead and glue it in. Weigh down the piece to keep all the edges flush.
 
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Old 10-06-05, 01:47 PM
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Lightbulb Thanks on Pergo dilemma

Thanks a million for help/advice!!!
Now we're getting somewhere!
By the way, all contractors suggest to replace the whole floor, rather than patching it.
Thanks again.
 
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Old 10-06-05, 01:52 PM
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They're just trying to make more $$$ off of you. There is no reason that it can't be patched as long as you have the supplies and the surface you are installing over is in good condition.
 
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Old 01-28-12, 12:59 PM
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This is good info. I have a slightly different question. I installed Pergo Presto Beech Blocked back in 2000. I too just recently did a similar remodel and removed a half wall. In antisipation of this remodel i went back to home depot and ordered some new planks to fill in the gap. My problem is the new planks and the old planks to not mate properly and the tongue and grooves used on the old floor and new floor are not the same anymore. Basiclly Pergo at some point in the last 10+ years re-engineered the tongue and groove design. So Now I have a shift in the surface of the floor where they will meet. Is there anyway to solve for this short of re-flooing the whole room?
 
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