changing hardwood flooring orientation

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  #1  
Old 10-01-00, 12:11 PM
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I am planning to install 3/4" hardwood (likely oak)
I am doing a livingroom, hallway, three bedrooms, and a stairway.
The actual labour is not a problem, nor are the basics of the job, however I would like to swing the orientation to 90 deg from the hall/lv rm once I enter the bedrooms, it this a problem for the 3/4" recommended expansion - specifically, if I do this, will hallway expansion spring the bedroom floor?

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  #2  
Old 10-01-00, 07:35 PM
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I doubt that this would be a problem. Almost all of the expansion of a wood floor is across the grain, not lengthwise. So the hallway will expand very little into a bedroom at the end of the hall. And the width of the hallway is small enough that expansion towards the bedrooms off the side of the hall will not be great either. As long as you leave an expansion gap on the far side of the bedrooms, I think you're okay. I invite other opinions.

P.S. Where do you live? What season do you intend to do the install? Perhaps you should install during the humid season, if you have one.
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-00, 12:09 PM
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I doubt expansion would be a problem, but you generally want to install hardwood flooring at 90 degrees to the joists.
 
  #4  
Old 10-04-00, 08:16 PM
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Usually hardwood is installed parallel with the long wall of a room, thereby perpendicular to the joists. When installing in adjacent rooms and halls that are perpendicular to the main room, you may want to turn the direction of the wood. Avoid laying the flooring in the short direction of a long hallway because it creates a ladder effect.
 
  #5  
Old 10-04-00, 09:25 PM
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If you have a structurely sound foudation and subfloor, that is at least 3/4" thick (the minimum recommendation by the NWFA for installation of 3/4" hardwood), the direction of the wood flooring has NO relation to the joists. If you live in an area where the bulding codes are lax or nonexistant then you may need to consider the layout of the joists, but for most homeowners this is a non-issue. I've been installing floors since jr. high here on the left coast and have seen very, very few wood subfloors that were not 3/4", 1-1/8" plywood, or 2"x6" car planks with joist/girder foundations. In all of these cases it's the subfloor that holds the nailing of the wood flooring, not the joists.

Scott Stephens www.stephensfloor.com
 
 

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